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Tsunami Buoy in "EVENT MODE" off New Jersey - Sudden 180' Water Depth Change

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posted on Apr, 26 2016 @ 09:04 PM
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The submarine theory would account for the trough, but not the crest. Strange indeed!




posted on Apr, 27 2016 @ 06:25 PM
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originally posted by: tigertatzen

originally posted by: openminded2011
a reply to: qiwi676

There is only one problem I see with the tsunami scenario. Correct me if I am wrong, but when tsunamis are in the deep water, they are only a couple of inches to a foot in height. They only raise up when they get close to shore. The only thing that would make this kind of depth change is a meteor strike or a huge uplift of the sea floor. So its either a malfunction or some unknown phenomena.


What could cause the sea floor to rise up without triggering alarms on any seismographic instruments?


That was kind of my point.



posted on Apr, 29 2016 @ 12:13 AM
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RSOE EDIS

This is contradictory. In the RSOE Event Detail NASA says it could be a meteor the size of a softball coming in at 14,000 mph.


The website superstation95.com reported the mysterious event over the weekend, and said that NASA advised that a meteor splashdown in the ocean near the buoy could have caused the event. The site also speculates that a nearby submarine could have dragged the buoy down and caused the anomaly. "It is possible that a small meteor, perhaps the size of a softball, made it to the ocean and, upon impact at 14,000 MPH, would cause quite a localized wave. There is no way to verify this possibility."


Yet here Firehouse.com , in the article Meteorite Didn't Cause Md. Brush Fire it states the Maryland fire/crater couldn't have been caused by a meteor because meteors lose their cosmic speed and just fall with the force of gravity.


"The reality is, nearly all meteorites explode high up in the atmosphere ... When they reach the ground, they have lost all cosmic velocity and are traveling with only the force of gravity pulling them down. The meteorites are not on fire and are not hot to the touch. They hit the earth at the same speed a golf ball would hit. And most of the time, they are about that size or smaller.


So who's the physics major? Why would NASA say it could have come in at 14,000 MPH?



posted on Apr, 29 2016 @ 12:50 AM
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a reply to: noah1111

Most meteorites fall to the earth around the speed all objects fall at on earth... Unless their design is satisfactory to create resistance like a feather for example...
Some fall to the ground a little faster at several hundred kilometers per second...

Most meteorites enter the earth's atmosphere at tremendous speeds ranging from 10/70 kilometers/sec but they are prone to resistance from the earth's atmosphere because of their speed and their weight being insufficient to counter said resistance... so slow to the speeds mentioned as common...

However some large meteorites that have sufficient size and or weight are not impeded by the resistance of earth's atmosphere and hit hard and fast... they hit the earth at near the speed of their entry...And because they travel so fast through the atmosphere large enough meteorites that retain their speed of entry at impact... do not see a massive burn up and size loss...
So NASA saying that is most likely covering something up...
That is unless that softball size meteorite was super heavy comprised of materials capable of withstanding a lot of heat... Which if it was that small and that heavy it would almost definitely be...And thanks to the information the OP is based on they know pretty much right where to find it...
edit on 29-4-2016 by 5StarOracle because: Word



posted on Apr, 29 2016 @ 05:21 PM
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originally posted by: Psychonautics
Isn't 180ft depth displacement a bit much for a sub? I mean, how exactly would that happen in the open ocean?

I'm gonna guess malfunction.


The submarine snags on the anchor line of the buoy, dragging it down until it the buoy goes underneath the submarine and pops back up to the surface.



posted on Apr, 29 2016 @ 05:22 PM
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a reply to: stormcell




The submarine snags on the anchor line of the buoy, dragging it down until it the buoy goes underneath the submarine and pops back up to the surface.

The depth sensor is not on the bouy.



posted on Apr, 30 2016 @ 12:31 PM
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originally posted by: qiwi676
So I have never made a thread before and usually like to just lurk. Here is my first one!

www.superstation95.com...

I did a search and didn't find this article anywhere so go ahead and remove it if it is a double post. Apparently something off the New Jersey coastline triggered a tsunami buoy. Whatever it was, it caused a 180 foot water depth change in a matter of seconds.

So far the current explanation is a very small meteor that made it through the atmosphere. Very curious to learn what it was for sure. A volcano maybe? Something underneath that corroded and finally collapsed? What are your thoughts ATS?

-qiwi


This can only mean one thing.......
















posted on Apr, 30 2016 @ 08:26 PM
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This happened regularly with a buoy near Christmas Island in the Timor Sea.

In fact it went into event mode so often, that they eventually REMOVED the buoy from the readings.

The interesting part was that they had supposedly 'fixed' the issue at one stage, but they kept on getting the readings. Till eventually they just removed it all together.

There is also one up near Japan (somewhere near Yonaguni if I'm not mistaken) that does this occasionally.

Sinkholes could be a explanation. That's what the famous 'bloop' noise is they recorded in the ocean that they couldn't work out.

The 'bloop' was a underwater cavern getting filled with water. Very simple. Don't know why it was so hard for them to work out.

- SB



posted on May, 1 2016 @ 08:46 PM
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a reply to: 5StarOracle

I'm willing to bet the Russians have a sub or two in the area. The Russian Navy has recently begun sending more of its subs out on patrol, more now than at any time since the end of the Cold War.



posted on May, 2 2016 @ 04:14 AM
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Delete if this has been posted here before but you may find the first 3 minutes interesting



posted on May, 3 2016 @ 02:40 PM
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originally posted by: openminded2011

originally posted by: tigertatzen

originally posted by: openminded2011
a reply to: qiwi676

There is only one problem I see with the tsunami scenario. Correct me if I am wrong, but when tsunamis are in the deep water, they are only a couple of inches to a foot in height. They only raise up when they get close to shore. The only thing that would make this kind of depth change is a meteor strike or a huge uplift of the sea floor. So its either a malfunction or some unknown phenomena.


What could cause the sea floor to rise up without triggering alarms on any seismographic instruments?


That was kind of my point.


I suppose I'm just echoing what other people are asking in a way...but it was a serious question. If there is anything that could make such a huge difference in the height of the sea floor that might possibly fail to alert seismograph. I was hoping someone might have an idea.



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