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Rape Culture

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posted on Apr, 17 2016 @ 12:17 PM
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originally posted by: RedCairo
I mean people are giving you a genuine chance to participate in a 'meaningful' way which you say you want. But in 15 pages of thread you've had almost no conversation that doesn't fit one of the descriptions above.


I open up about a personal experience. I even offer personal background information like parental divorce, and first hand experience with multiple custody battles. I ask one question, and in return all I get is the equivalent of, "I WANT MORE, MORE, MORE!".

I tried.

It's a bit scary to think that someone who supports the idea of a Rape Culture can't even offer an opinion regarding what fits their definition of rape. To me that would seem to be a fundamental term to attempt to define before supporting the labeling a culture with it.
edit on 4/17/16 by redmage because: (no reason given)




posted on Apr, 17 2016 @ 07:03 PM
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originally posted by: InTheLight

originally posted by: TheBadCabbie

originally posted by: InTheLight

originally posted by: SlapMonkey
a reply to: rockintitz

I think what many people fail to understand is that those who rape people have a mental problem that isn't fixed by logical discussion.

Those who continue to treat rapists as if logical discussion will fix the problem are literally part of the problem, because they often choose to berate those who suggest constructive ideas (concealed carry and training for women, self-defense classes, et.) that empower potential victims are the wrong solution.

Both mindsets baffle my sense of understanding.



It could be a mental problem or a programming (culture) issue, but I do agree with you that the berating of those trying to find solutions and open up dialogue about this is wrong. However, if packing a gun and self-defence skills is a person's only solution, then so be it, but it is wrong to put the responsibility there and not deal with (or even acknowledge) the underlying problem.

What is/are the underlying problem(s), in your opinion?


It is complex and I am still trying to figure it out, moreso if women's supposed sexual freedom actually produces a push-back from those that have a warped need to control and gain power over others, and use the violence of rape to satisfy that need. What then is the underlying cause of that need? A result of violence begats violence via bullying from being bullied? Mob mentality? A mental illness or psychosis?

What do think it is, or where it comes from?

www.theguardian.com...

Primarily, true psychosis and extreme sociopathy, in my opinion. Psychosis being a complete lack of emapthy and guilt. Sociopathy being a tendency to deviate from social norms, extreme where sexual assault is a part of it.

With an extreme sociopath, I suppose she or he might make the assault about power and not sex, as the horrible opinion piece that you linked suggests. I think more likely motivators would be lack of a healthy outlet for one's sexual energies, combined with an inability to effectively cope with that deficiency. Plenty of women and men are sexually frustrated. It is the people who can't cope with that frustration that should concern us I think. Most people successfully repress or find a better way to cope with that frustration.

With an extreme sociopath there could be any number of justifications that the attacker has developed to justify her or his behavior, a power trip being only one. I really think sex crimes are more about sex than power though. Maybe it's occasionally all about some power trip thing but these are sex crimes: sex is very much a part of them. I have a hard time, then, agreeing with the idea that sex crimes aren't even really about sex at all.



posted on Apr, 17 2016 @ 07:37 PM
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originally posted by: RedCairo

At this point most men I know have no idea what to do around women because no matter what they do, probably someone is going to get all offended about it. And most men I know aren't even complaining about whatever it is women want, they just want SOME kind of consistent rules so it doesn't seem like the whole of the social world is stacked against them and they're damned either way. This can not only affect their mating but career and more, so it's not really the small issue it might seem.

It's like a "dysfunctional family" behavior has been taken to the public at this point and we have an entire culture of men walking on eggshells, and gradually learning to seek permission/validation from women around them even subtly for levels of "being" that are just ridiculous and should be independent -- most aren't even aware of how this permeates their life. It's bad enough for 'men', it's even worse for boys growing up in it, especially with the stunning % of single moms (as I am btw). Books like "No More Mr. Nice Guy" and "The Way of Men" are good reading for men on these topics (I once got those for my best friend, who is a man, for Valentine's Day, and he he liked them as well as most the reviewers did on Amazon).

So they're already always on the edge of being 'wrong' according to some woman no matter how hard they try socially, and then the media regularly cycle-explodes with insisting that all men are inherently rapists -- so now they're all wrong period, they don't have to do anything at all.

At this point I think any human nature, but especially the more-commonly-aggressive nature of dominantly-testosterone driven biologicals, is going to get snarky, defensive, sarcastic and satirical, and lose a lot of the kinder, gentler nature they might normally have, or have had, prior to modern feminism making them feel either insecure or paranoid or both.

This is not about rape. Your point that the assumptions about all men and rape are inherently sexist are right though, I think.

RC

Been there, done that. It is no fun, I can tell you. I've thought up and discarded a few lengthy rants in formulating my reply to you, but I'll just briefly say that I have been put in this position more times than I care to recount. It has affected my ability to relate to the fairer sex a great deal, and never in a positive way.

I am an example of this kind of mistreatment at the hands of the fairer sex. Being ignorant of the social dynamics behind this, I used to beat myself up about this kind of stuff thinking there was something wrong with me. I think in retrospect I had mostly just chosen the wrong women to approach, not knowing that they had been (mis)indoctrinated in this fashion.

Having gained a greater awareness of these issues in more recent years, I mostly tend to feel sorry for women who act out in this manner. So fearful. So controlled by their skewed worldview. It's sad.

A little contemptuous as well, to be honest. If they want to try and treat me like I'm some kind of predator simply because I politely expressed an interest in them, I am perfectly content to walk away as quickly as I walked up. They can visit their abuse on some other unsuspecting male victim. This man will have no part in it, except of course to be attacked from afar for refusing to play by their messed up rules.

edit on 17-4-2016 by TheBadCabbie because: edit



posted on Apr, 18 2016 @ 04:23 AM
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Last night I was thinking about this philosophically while doing some tedious work.

I suspect the underlying problem of rape's occurrence and the political disaster conversation has become is due to the inability our culture has in dealing with our species role as part of the animal kingdom. We seem to think we are some magical exception to biology's rules.

(Excluding from this discussion men for whom malnourishment, childhood experiences, or interests (low testosterone, pathologies, or non-female interests) are at work, and speaking only regarding relatively healthy hetero males and the same on the women's side; and speaking only of male-female connections.)

*

Observing my daughter, I concluded by the time she was 9-10 months old that humans were born hunters and thieves. When she couldn't even walk she could hold herself on stuff and she could run, and she went through elaborate sneaking, waiting, distraction games with me on our outside porch to get me to not notice that she was sneaking around to the bush filled with bright red insanely hot peppers, and then would steal one and run like hell as I'd be yelling. I'd nearly kill myself trying to catch her in my panic but she would literally swallow the damn thing whole and it didn't bother her at all.

If one watches the 'tendencies' of women and men, of course you see patterns, there are very obvious. If men want to kill someone they usually do it promptly and directly. Women will usually give it time and do it indirectly (or via a man). There's a ton of differences between the genders that show up in everything, from shopping to child-rearing to business to social stuff.

Most of these differences, although many have cultural overlays or skews, are because biologically there are some fundamental differences, and this in at least small part because hormones drive a great deal of behavior.

*

I lose count of how many men have told me this: men want to have sex with women. All women. Yes even inappropriate women. The drive is intense. Full stop. That's the animal part of the biology. Anybody pretending this isn't fundamentally true is trying to make men into something they're not. Biology doesn't give a damn whether it's culturally or socially appropriate. But:

There's also a cognitive part of the biology of humans. And that part has:
* morals, which keeps them from their mother, sister, daughter and niece (we hope);
* ethics, which keeps them from business or military underlings, friends or anybody with a positive relationship who is temporarily vulnerable (which they recognize they should be protecting not taking advantage of);
* legal and cultural taboos, which cover some of of those things and other things (including race, age);
* social relationships, both intimate and general, which rules out sister-in-laws and the neighbor's wife or friend's little sister or close female friends (well... usually);
* personal preferences, such as distaste about obesity or preference for blondes or desire for older or younger women; also, spiritual stuff goes here, as many are either celibate or their behavior is simply constrained based on those beliefs; and personal experience, which may make their mother or daughter sexually repellent to them for example;
* and lastly, wary survival skills, which evaluates how screwed they'll be (now or later) if they just take what they want in a given situation.

Aside from all that it has some psychological settings based likely on childhood or general experience (from romance to combat, some experiences can be "marking"), of the sort where in summary, men don't want women to cry, or don't care, or actually kinda do want them to cry, and that one's a big pointer to a likely problem, both the last two options.

We are innately hunters and thieves. All of us. We just operate differently. If food/water is covered, sex is at the top of the focus list for men. Especially young men but really all of them that are healthy and not filtered-out.

So here's man, there's a variety of options all of which his body wants, all the filters are applied, what's left.

The problem is each of those filters is a category of its own, and a man's place on it is on a spectrum, and that may even change, sometimes shifting with 'circumstance.' The circ may make a man think it's more ok, or it might make him think it's more likely there won't be a negative outcome, or it may merely compare to how his biology is reacting at that moment to needing sex and whether any of those filters (including consequence) seem more important to him at that moment.

When I was younger and faking it was a norm, I wouldn't have understood. When my hormones shifted and especially when I discovered the G-spot (holy cats, why was I so old by then), being in the middle or even just well developed into a sexual experience even solo, was so powerful, I suddenly got a massive empathy for men I hadn't had before. At the point where I hit the runway for coming-soon takeoff, nothing exists in my universe except that. Everything else is buried in a haze of colored blurry noise that feels totally unimportant comparatively. Anything interrupting had better be literally a threat to my life or I'd ignore it.

Just a tiny bit it reminds me of the histamine experience -- like if you have serious inflammation under the skin, you can be standing in the shower and if you run the spray of hot water on it, the body begs for more, and wants it hotter. I've had some health issues that had a lot of this in one area and I could literally be screaming in pain from burning myself, while shouting in ecstasy begging for more, while shaking violently from the trauma, and still forcing the sort of "itching/scratching" response of the scalding water like unable to stop. (I theorize this is behind some of the kinkier sex in the world but I wouldn't know lol.) Sometimes the body is so driven it's not just that a person might hurt another, even what they consider mildly (such as a woman they were nearly at sex with or already at sex with who suddenly says no) -- they might even hurt themselves, even severely.

This is biology. Yes, we measure a person's civilization by their ability to make the 'cognitive' side of their humanity 'dominate' the biological side of their humanity. But that is a balance and a contrast. HOW strong the biology is and how weak the filters are will vary with age, circumstance, and the bio drive right then.

Some people's filters are screwed and they will be criminals, or premeditated rapists, or child molesters, no matter what. This is a fairly small percentage of the population, but I attribute this to being criminal, and I actually don't include outright assault-theft-rape-murder-premeditation-criminals when I am talking about men in general (I wouldn't include them when talking about women in general either). We all know this bottom of the bell curve exists. No point to theorizing 'why' with them.

Some people's filters are still developing (particularly for young men), and tend to fluctuate a lot with the situation, often as the status of various filters compete with each other and compete with how intense the biological drive is right that moment.

All men want sex but not all men are rapists. One is biological. The other is behaviorial which includes cognition. A spectrum. Not just saint or criminal.

RC



posted on Apr, 18 2016 @ 05:01 AM
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(continued)

But the modern perception is that either:

a) all men should be saints or they are criminals (nothing in between) and

b) the assumption that if all men want sex with pretty much all women, that they are hence inherently rapists.

I would say they (AND women) are inherently hunters and thieves biologically and we do our best to instill family and cultural and social cognitive elements to override that at least "within the tribe."

Of course we haven't got a tribe anymore so there is no bad guy and there is no exemption group, both of which have played a profoundly important and always-present role in human culture (hence biology's dev/adapt) since the dawn of recorded time.

We are not only in culture shock for 5000 other reasons, but because of that one.

The creation of these new academic and social media cults (which Designer-Victim Feminism behaves like) which isolate a common-enemy (now it's men) and then gradually attempt to win/wrest individuals from the population into joining them as the new family is worrisome. Cults generally have a certain criteria of presentation to people that says "Look, you identify with this, we're your people!" and re-classifying a great deal of basic human experience between the genders into something assaulting is a good way of getting women to feel that the people they know are enemies or likely will be, so turn to the protection of the group.

Tons of young college women (we'll call her Sara) don't report 'rape' because it wasn't rape, or because between two divergent human perspectives or bad circumstance it kinda just fell into that "sh*t happens" category. But then women around them start harping on it. They're taken to people who are 'leaders' (in making women feel like victims) for counseling and help (we'll call her Marge). And a few days or weeks or months later of peer-cult influence they decide:

You're right. It doesn't matter if it was a combination of factors at work in that situation and I'm sorry it happened but I like Jake. I didn't want to obliterate his life, sports and future career, $70,000 of school loans, years of that life, family reputation, community reputation, school reputation, the nightmare of the prosecution for both of us, years of enslavement and rape and assault and possibly his murder at the hands of prison -- no, no. What is MOST IMPORTANT, now I understand thanks to Marge and everyone around me, is that this event was horrible and Jake is my enemy (because really all men inherently are) and he must be punished! I must carry this through not only for me but on behalf of ALL women who don't have evidence or closure.

When this blurs into a "culture" assignment, it became "larger than life." It was no longer about Jake and Sara. It was about Jake vs. Oh My God The Good Of The Entire Culture And All Women.

An entire culture of problem and thousands of women without closure are surely more important than any one man. It then becomes an "ideal." Ideals, being emotional at base, override all forms of logic.

Including those that think the constitution and due process exist precisely to minimize this mass hysteria ruling.

But there's still a big grey area of social existence between 'daily life' and 'the legal system.' How to keep any woman from falling into the claws of the cult, which may help her to retroactively either decide a rape happened at all, or decide a sex experience is worth considering at legal not just social levels, is a mystery. I feel sorry for young men in particular.

*

True to the effect of emotionally manipulative bullies that the Designer Victim Feminists (DVF's) behave as, men will be so busy arguing that they are not all rapists, or that rape really ought to involve genitals somewhere in the definition, that they really will have no space or necessary 'thoughtful consideration and subtlety' to argue about:

The element of human behavior on a spectrum; of not all intercourse situations without 'official' permission being 'equal' in 'criminalization.'

Regardless of how people play with definitions (and especially when they make them all-inclusive), making the consequence for every situation be so extreme creates a Gestapo situation, it's social terrorism.

RC
edit on 18-4-2016 by RedCairo because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 18 2016 @ 05:15 AM
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a reply to: RedCairo

I think another important biological issue, especially when it comes to perceived problems and how to cope, is the common difference in approach to a given issue.

Men have an innate desire to fix things. If we see, or hear of a problem, then we want to get to the root and solve it. Make progress. Do something. Women often have an entirely different approach. The majority of my friends have always been female, and it often amazed me that merely talking about something is often all it takes for a woman to "feel better". As a man, I'm hard pressed to think of an instance where "getting it off my chest" made me feel significantly "better", and I think that this biological difference in approach to issues has a lot to do with much of the communication breakdown that occurs between the sexes.

Add in a problem like rape (especially when plastering it upon an entire culture), constant blurring of the lines regarding the definition ("eye rape", "birth rape", etc.), and human communicative approach differences; it makes headway towards an agreed solution extremely difficult.

edit on 4/18/16 by redmage because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 18 2016 @ 05:21 AM
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a reply to: redmage

That reminds me of one of the funniest video shorts exactly on this!

youtu.be...


.

edit on 18-4-2016 by RedCairo because: putting in vid identifier (not a #) for youtube icon didn't work at all


edit on 18-4-2016 by RedCairo because: spacing



posted on Apr, 18 2016 @ 05:34 AM
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originally posted by: RedCairo
a reply to: redmage

That reminds me of one of the funniest video shorts exactly on this!

youtu.be...


It's a miracle! For once, a good cry made me feel better!

*tears of laughter*



posted on Apr, 18 2016 @ 11:46 AM
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a reply to: RedCairo

Could the Rape Culture hypothesis be a case of "talking about it" gone awry?

Tossing around the term to describe glances, birth process, and other instances certainly puts it "out there" in people's faces, and no doubt opens up dialogue on the subject, but at what point does this very-present dialogue (and hyperbole) turn to desensitization? I think Chelsdh expressed what many are currently feeling which leads me to think that supporters of the Rape Culture hypothesis may have hit that wall on the issue.

Then we have the MSM. There's nothing the MSM loves more than to let you know what to be afraid of next; so the notion of a Rape Culture is right up their alley. It's the ultimate scare tactic because it's such a despicable crime. I think the media fed hysteria has quite possibly reached the point of doing more harm than good for the cause of awareness, when it comes to rape, by lending credence to the currently supported mindset of, "Everything is sexist. Everything is racist. Everything is homophobic, and it's up to you to point it all out.". Believers and followers of this mindset seem to have extended it to, "Everything is rape" as well (by labeling an entire culture), and it's clearly already having the effect of diminishing and trivializing the meaning and impact of the term for many.



edit on 4/18/16 by redmage because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 18 2016 @ 11:58 AM
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originally posted by: InTheLight
a reply to: redmage

I cannot make an informed opinion without your input, by defining and explaining why you think it was rape and not betrayal.


Do you suggest asking every woman that claims to be raped this?

"Are you sure youre not just feeling 'betrayed' instead?"

You came off as incredibly condescending and patronizing, which makes you look hypocritical.



posted on Apr, 18 2016 @ 12:07 PM
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originally posted by: InTheLight



Using the word rape to describe activities other than actual rape lessens the impact that such violation should have on us, and strays dangerously close to normalizing it.

Rape is a crossing of another’s sexual boundaries without their permission—or with their coerced permission. It is a sexualized trespassing and violation of their being. Its tools are various combinations of physical force, threat, coercion, abuse of authority, manipulation, and a capacity to shut off empathy and override conscience. Rape features aggression and lust in a darkly compelling embrace, being allowed to possess and run one, in contexts ranging from the mundane to the evil.


www.truth-out.org...


The link she posted as an answer to your question says it all.

"Rape is a crossing of another’s sexual boundaries without their permission"

So, HAD you known she was married you would not have had intercourse. Why? Sounds like you had a sexual boundary that includes not sleeping with someone else's partner.

You were raped according to the quote posted. She gave her answer.

I have the same sexual boundary, not because shes "married" as such being connected to another person via documents and a handshake.

The real problem with it for me IMHO is I am very uncomfortable for me to be with someone who has been with another within the same day or so.

Call me a germophobe, I would consider it rape well within the definition posted above. Its disgusting to think of and I would be mortified and sick if I knew about it.


edit on 4182016 by Butterfinger because: spelling



posted on Apr, 18 2016 @ 01:19 PM
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a reply to: redmage




Could the Rape Culture hypothesis be a case of "talking about it" gone awry?


I think you hit the nail on the head there!!!! Talking about things can be very cathartic, especially for women. And I think for some people it can give a "high". I know that I went through a very traumatic experience (having nothing to do with any kind of rape, unless you can say my emotions were raped) and it felt SO good to talk it over with someone. I eventually had to make myself stop because nothing new was coming out of my mouth, and it wasn't helping me to heal any longer. However, I think you are correct and that some people want to "talk it out" into oblivion, and can't, or won't stop.



posted on Apr, 18 2016 @ 01:20 PM
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originally posted by: Butterfinger
The link she posted as an answer to your question says it all.


I intentionally avoided making such assumptions, and made great effort to give her every opportunity to engage in meaningful dialogue by giving her multiple opportunities to voice her own thoughts and opinions regarding the situation.


originally posted by: Butterfinger
So, HAD you known she was married you would not have had intercourse. Why? Sounds like you had a sexual boundary that includes not sleeping with someone else's partner.


Yes, I believe that if someone is willing to cheat with you, then you shouldn't be surprised when they cheat on you. That's not the type of person I'm interested in being with.



posted on Apr, 18 2016 @ 05:53 PM
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originally posted by: TheBadCabbie

Been there, done that. It is no fun, I can tell you. I've thought up and discarded a few lengthy rants in formulating my reply to you, but I'll just briefly say that I have been put in this position more times than I care to recount. It has affected my ability to relate to the fairer sex a great deal, and never in a positive way.


I suppose this is not exactly true. Learning to shrug off women's unwarranted antagonistic behavior has been a positive experience. I no longer think there might be something wrong with me when I get this type of reaction, because I realize that these women are just victims of their social programming and the pervasive culture of feminism gone wrong.
edit on 18-4-2016 by TheBadCabbie because: edit



posted on Apr, 20 2016 @ 10:57 AM
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a reply to: rockintitz

I am choosing to reply to the original post rather than read through the comments and potentially get fired up on another topic.

We do not promote rape. When has anyone seen said "Yeah I would rape her" openly and not been condemned for it? We have a multitude of rights for women and men who have been raped. That's right. MEN. Men can be taken advantage of too... in fact, I suspect that there are JUST as many men. Why? Because it is somehow considered "unmanly" to be taken advantage of. I have had a multitude of guys waking up with strange women on top of them after going to bed alone. Some call it "partying too hard" because she is a woman but if the situation had been reversed, that guy would be thrown in prison so fast it isn't even funny.

If someone is going to cry about rape culture, they better be including men in that category as well. Men are just as much victims as women are.

Furthermore, I believe that if someone is accusing someone else of rape and those allegations are found to be false, I believe that the accuser should serve the same sentence that the accused would have served. In cases of people spending years in prison before it comes out that the accusations are a lie, the sentence should be doubled for the accuser.

Rape is a serious conversation about serious problem for some people. If we aren't willing to look at it from both sides (men and women, accuser and accused) how do we expect to advance as a society? I could go on for days, but I will stop here.



posted on Apr, 20 2016 @ 01:37 PM
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a reply to: SomeDumbBroad
Men play a big part in the number of nonreported rapes.

In our culture of blame the victim, the number of nonreported rapes continue to rise. The trivializing of rape, and the marginalizing of victims, is not new. Actually, it is historical.


Furthermore, I believe that if someone is accusing someone else of rape and those allegations are found to be false, I believe that the accuser should serve the same sentence that the accused would have served. In cases of people spending years in prison before it comes out that the accusations are a lie, the sentence should be doubled for the accuser. 


This is a sure fire way to make sure no one that is a victim of rape, will ever report it.

I have seen cases where a victim's case was thrown out, not because they weren't raped, but because of some procedural, or evidence handling screw up.

It just isn't as easy or simple as it may seem.

Is a person that is being held as a sex slave, that agrees to have sex, under fear of lost of life or limb, or fear of lost of life or limb of a family member, or loved one, not a rape victim?

Is a child that agrees to have sex, or even initiates sex, out of fear of life, limb, or abandonment, not a victim of rape?

It just isn't always as cut and dry as some try to make it.

Throwing the baby out with the bath water is a lousy solution. In my opinion.


edit on 20-4-2016 by NightSkyeB4Dawn because: Word fix.



posted on Apr, 21 2016 @ 05:57 AM
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a reply to: rockintitz

To the original post agreed, with everything there. We don't live in a rape culture. Rape is not socially acceptable here in the US, at least in all of the areas I've ever lived. I think it's pretty much nationwide. Most guys and girls would never take another against their will. That kind of stuff happens, I'm sure. There are gangs and cults up to that kind of stuff here and there I'd guess. Regular people though, rank and file America, non extreme sociopath or psychopath, no way. Crimes of passion and drunken misunderstandings gone to hell, sure. A culture that condones, advocates, recommends, endorses, or defends rape? No. We don't have that here.

There are places in the world where this type of disgusting behavior is more socially acceptable. This is not one of them.

We've got a lot of nervous guys I think, like some of the other posters said. Not really sure what to make of some womens' odd and standoffish behavior. I think it relates to the whole rape joke thing in an interesting way that I recently noticed. I brought up the au news gender thread in a bar the other night to a couple guys I was talking with. The way they took the conversation and turned it into a rape joke was interesting. I mentioned about how the boys' song on their night out had morphed into a "rape chant" ala social media, and they were like "I know it's like you can't even do a rape chant anymore it's bullship". Almost like it was an unconscious defense mechanism. Like they were secretly thinking "oh okay well you're going to confront me with this story that might even remotely imply I could be a rapist I'm just going to go the whole nine yards and tell a rape joke. There, now you can go ahead and think whatever horrible things about me that you want." They didn't actually discuss the issue with me at all. I think I even tried to casually rebroach it, which elicited a sort of zen type of dismissal. These guys weren't rapists, at least I would be very surprised to learn that they were. Seemed like regular guys. It looked to me like they reacted that way because it made them nervous, and that it was a defense mechanism. No sane man I know wants to be thought of as a rapist, making that a pretty natural fear among men.

I think the real rape culture in America is in the drug culture, and it's not so much the drugs themselves in my opinion as it is their prohibition. Illegal drug users are highly unlikely to involve the law in most cases. Predators know this. The gateway to human trafficking there is really again more about the drug prohibition than the drugs themselves. End prohibition and you remove the criminal element's necessary association with drug use. You also remove a drug user's primary incentive to avoid law enforcement.

It's sad to me that our pop culture seems caught up in this pastime of gender warfare as it is today, when the issues of organized sex crimes are real and the real obvious social problems are not more directly addressed. I also think that this social trend is just unhealthy for us as a society in my opinion. The more the genders are put at odds with each other, the more common that folk developing wrongheaded approaches to realationships and sex will be. I think we'll get over it, but yuck! We have an unhealthy and confusing approach to sex and relationships in many circles in this country, and it does us no good as a society.
edit on 21-4-2016 by TheBadCabbie because: (no reason given)

edit on 21-4-2016 by TheBadCabbie because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 21 2016 @ 06:15 AM
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a reply to: rockintitz

Come to think of it, I have my own little brand of defensive flirting that I apply when a female starts to lay the whole creepy guy rap thing on me(one that's actually witty enough to not involve rape jokes).



posted on Apr, 21 2016 @ 09:23 AM
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originally posted by: RedCairo
That reminds me of one of the funniest video shorts exactly on this!
youtu.be...


And since "talking about it" and it becoming a whole separate subject just based on that came up, one of the other funniest-but-truest-things-ever is Dave Barry's classic article on how men and women communicate:

truthbook.com...

I know some would say this is a stereotype -- every generalization is of course -- but AS a woman I still had to admit it was hilariously spot on for many experiences I've had or observed.

RC




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