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Whould you get in this if I told you it goes to the moon?

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posted on Apr, 5 2016 @ 10:21 AM
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Totally only rambling here my reply is not even about appollo11 just the experience aspect of it all so feel free to skip this seriously.. I took a glimpse of the OP before I left to shops got stuck in the traffic and for nothing in the world could I stop thinking about this so I might as well comment..

Ever since I can remember I have this image in my head : me looking at the moon and earth in full from space I loved the idea because I felt like nothing could touch me.. and I still mean it I would contemplate a bank loan to go (you only live once) yet the fear of the what ifs.. To me it seriously doesn't matter what type of spaceship it is (Apollo 11 or whatever) I would be completely terrified of the experience itself (like when I started to learn to drive I was scared of the driving itself it didn't matter what car I would be sitting in naturally the technology always advances) I believe it has to do more with the astronaut training. This is the spacecraft I read upon in February like I said, it is long life dream of mine. Lynx ($95000 a ticket)

www.space-affairs.com...

Though regardless.. they could give me all the documents of how incredibly advanced this aircraft is and provide me with all the experience and flight hours the pilot has done I would be out of my mind to just go for it. Ideally if they somehow let you simulate the flight before the takeoff itself. I mean i believe having that option would be worth while both for the company and the customers that will come along the ride.. I mean you have this incredibly advanced aircraft obviously the objective for the developers would be for people to enjoy this experience to its widest potential.. Just processing this all in my head thinking about the founders obviously they are all well aware the crafts quality, years of research and development then went into it, all the hours of man power, technological advancement and science this craft represent.. I would be so tempted to try this it would be super cool if they let me "try it" first.. I would need to feel completely comfortable with the pilot too and the aircraft itself, it wouldn't help if they simply told me how it works. Ideally (like the example with the driving) the pilot would have to be willing to sit back so I can get completely comfortable and not feel silly I would feel super curious about how everything (all the way from the takeoff to the landing) feels, best would be if the pilot let me completely test drive the craft myself only then all the adrenaline would pour so I am not afraid to just go for it.. I love love driving so this would be like a zillion times more exhilarating experience (moon here I come)

Anyhow About Lynx


XCOR Aerospace of Mojave, Calif., It is already selling $95,000 tickets on a space plane called the Lynx. "You're sitting in the cockpit," says XCOR chief operating officer Andrew Nelson, a two-passenger maximum into selling points. "It's going to be a real astronaut experience." Unlike capsules and other space planes, Lynx will fire its custom-made kerosene and liquid-oxygen rocket engines to take off horizontally from a runway, as a plane does, and then climb steeply on its way to space.
HOW IT WORKS
Takeoff: The space plane speeds along a runway under the power of four rocket engines.
Ascent: The Lynx reaches Mach 2.9 as it speeds straight upward.
Apogee: The engines cut out about 3 minutes after takeoff. The craft follows a parabolic trajectory in suborbital space.
Reentry: Thermal insulation on the nose and leading edges of the wings protect the craft from the heat of reentry.
Landing: The space plane sheds speed by circling in a downward corkscrew. The wing area is sized for landing at moderate speeds, near 110 knots—a little slower than that of an airliner during a landing.
Fly Again: Lynx's creators say the space plane will be able to make four flights a day.


lol I just found an article that says exactly what I was rambling on about (its even mandatory) nvm I wrote this for 1.5 h I may as well post this sorry



It is a scientific platform
The Lynx will carry out scientific programs on almost every flight. So while you are enjoying a life-changing experience, you may also contribute to scientific research with great potential to benefit mankind.

Mission tactics course (mandatory)
Desdemona SimulatorDesdemona Simulator

The Desdemona simulator is a state-of-the-art simulator and unique in its kind. Built by the Austrian company AMST and TNO, it is located in Soesterberg, the Netherlands.

Desdemona is the first simulator that is both full-motion and capable of generating all possible G-forces up to 3.3G. In the cockpit, an advanced high-resolution video simulation gives the astronaut a view of almost 180 degrees wide. No simulator anywhere in the world can generate the high performance simulation you will experience in Desdemona.




posted on Apr, 5 2016 @ 10:26 AM
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a reply to: butcherguy




Here is the velocity needed to escape the Moon's gravity: 5323.9 mph

Lets remember the LM didn't even need escape velocity.
Only orbital velocity.
The Apollo Service module did the rest.

Clearly the OP hasn't bothered to read the most basic Apollo mission profiles.
Sometimes it's best to leave these people alone.



posted on Apr, 5 2016 @ 10:42 AM
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a reply to: ProfessorPatternfish

What I take from your post is: Would you have the balls? And it is clear that you personally would not. Don't worry though, neither would I to be honest.

Not so fun-fact. There were only 5 Space Shuttle Orbiters built, 2 of them were destroyed in accidents. Now getting into one of THEM took such balls I am surprised those people could actually walk, both the men AND the women!

SO then, at the end of the day, we have established a lack of balls and not much else really.




posted on Apr, 5 2016 @ 10:42 AM
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originally posted by: samkent
a reply to: butcherguy




Here is the velocity needed to escape the Moon's gravity: 5323.9 mph

Lets remember the LM didn't even need escape velocity.
Only orbital velocity.
The Apollo Service module did the rest.

Clearly the OP hasn't bothered to read the most basic Apollo mission profiles.
Sometimes it's best to leave these people alone.

Correct. That would only require 3,355 mph.
Thank you.



posted on Apr, 5 2016 @ 10:48 AM
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originally posted by: Jonjonj
a reply to: ProfessorPatternfish

What I take from your post is: Would you have the balls? And it is clear that you personally would not. Don't worry though, neither would I to be honest.

Not so fun-fact. There were only 5 Space Shuttle Orbiters built, 2 of them were destroyed in accidents. Now getting into one of THEM took such balls I am surprised those people could actually walk, both the men AND the women!

SO then, at the end of the day, we have established a lack of balls and not much else really.



Wow you seem to know me so well?

What else do you know about me that I don't?

I am honestly interested.


FYI. If someone. NASA offered me the chance to go into space.

I would rip there arm off and say thanks lets go.



posted on Apr, 5 2016 @ 10:49 AM
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a reply to: Soylent Green Is People

Im not suggesting one blindly accepts anything, but waters wet, the skys blue, the Apollo program happened and Man as you know has indeed walked on the surface of the Moon.

I suggest everyone question everything, the world would be a better place it they did. But once in possession of the facts there is no point in diminishing the achievement by entertaining silly hyperbole aka the Moon hoax conspiracy.



posted on Apr, 5 2016 @ 10:53 AM
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originally posted by: ProfessorPatternfish

originally posted by: Jonjonj
a reply to: ProfessorPatternfish

What I take from your post is: Would you have the balls? And it is clear that you personally would not. Don't worry though, neither would I to be honest.

Not so fun-fact. There were only 5 Space Shuttle Orbiters built, 2 of them were destroyed in accidents. Now getting into one of THEM took such balls I am surprised those people could actually walk, both the men AND the women!

SO then, at the end of the day, we have established a lack of balls and not much else really.



Wow you seem to know me so well?

What else do you know about me that I don't?

I am honestly interested.


FYI. If someone. NASA offered me the chance to go into space.

I would rip there arm off and say thanks lets go.


Oh..so you DO trust the engineers to do their job then? Good



posted on Apr, 5 2016 @ 11:02 AM
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originally posted by: ProfessorPatternfish

originally posted by: Jonjonj
a reply to: ProfessorPatternfish

What I take from your post is: Would you have the balls? And it is clear that you personally would not. Don't worry though, neither would I to be honest.

Not so fun-fact. There were only 5 Space Shuttle Orbiters built, 2 of them were destroyed in accidents. Now getting into one of THEM took such balls I am surprised those people could actually walk, both the men AND the women!

SO then, at the end of the day, we have established a lack of balls and not much else really.



Wow you seem to know me so well?

What else do you know about me that I don't?

I am honestly interested.


FYI. If someone. NASA offered me the chance to go into space.

I would rip there arm off and say thanks lets go.


Are you sure? Because your OP says this...



I am curios, in this day and age. With what we know about space exploration. Would anyone really get in this Apollo 11 Lander if was told it goes to the moon? I wouldn't. I would laugh and say; "It looks like it is made of card, left over Christmas wrapping paper and egg cartons".


Good job at least space engineers test for consistency, you clearly don't.




posted on Apr, 5 2016 @ 11:09 AM
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W*ould you get in this if I told you it goes to the moon?


I've always noted its flimsy appearance but, considering it had to be designed, tested and built in a matter of less than 10 years?

I mean, seriously, if it was a fake to pretend we went to the moon, Hollywood could have... and likely would have offered up something akin to the little service vehicles from 2001: A Space Odyssey.

Nope. This LEM was tossed together and sent to space... and it worked.




posted on Apr, 5 2016 @ 11:19 AM
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I haven't read the whole thread yet but,,,If someone convinced me it would work? all I could say is , where do I put the keys?a reply to: ProfessorPatternfish



posted on Apr, 5 2016 @ 11:23 AM
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originally posted by: Jonjonj

originally posted by: ProfessorPatternfish

originally posted by: Jonjonj
a reply to: ProfessorPatternfish

What I take from your post is: Would you have the balls? And it is clear that you personally would not. Don't worry though, neither would I to be honest.

Not so fun-fact. There were only 5 Space Shuttle Orbiters built, 2 of them were destroyed in accidents. Now getting into one of THEM took such balls I am surprised those people could actually walk, both the men AND the women!

SO then, at the end of the day, we have established a lack of balls and not much else really.



Wow you seem to know me so well?

What else do you know about me that I don't?

I am honestly interested.


FYI. If someone. NASA offered me the chance to go into space.

I would rip there arm off and say thanks lets go.


Are you sure? Because your OP says this...



I am curios, in this day and age. With what we know about space exploration. Would anyone really get in this Apollo 11 Lander if was told it goes to the moon? I wouldn't. I would laugh and say; "It looks like it is made of card, left over Christmas wrapping paper and egg cartons".


Good job at least space engineers test for consistency, you clearly don't.




I just wouldn't get in an egg box to go to the moon.

Ill jump in the space shuttle.

Ill even ask if I can have a go on the controls too.



posted on Apr, 5 2016 @ 11:38 AM
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originally posted by: ProfessorPatternfish

originally posted by: Jonjonj

originally posted by: ProfessorPatternfish

originally posted by: Jonjonj
a reply to: ProfessorPatternfish

What I take from your post is: Would you have the balls? And it is clear that you personally would not. Don't worry though, neither would I to be honest.

Not so fun-fact. There were only 5 Space Shuttle Orbiters built, 2 of them were destroyed in accidents. Now getting into one of THEM took such balls I am surprised those people could actually walk, both the men AND the women!

SO then, at the end of the day, we have established a lack of balls and not much else really.



Wow you seem to know me so well?

What else do you know about me that I don't?

I am honestly interested.


FYI. If someone. NASA offered me the chance to go into space.

I would rip there arm off and say thanks lets go.


Are you sure? Because your OP says this...



I am curios, in this day and age. With what we know about space exploration. Would anyone really get in this Apollo 11 Lander if was told it goes to the moon? I wouldn't. I would laugh and say; "It looks like it is made of card, left over Christmas wrapping paper and egg cartons".


Good job at least space engineers test for consistency, you clearly don't.




I just wouldn't get in an egg box to go to the moon.

Ill jump in the space shuttle.

Ill even ask if I can have a go on the controls too.

You still haven't explained why you feel that exposed reflective foil insulation on The LM makes it any less space-worthy just because that insulation is exposed.

Besides it not "looking right" to you, what real technical issues do you have with it?

I mean, I've already showed you that the crew cabin is a simple cylindrical pressure vessel, and the rest of the stuff is built around that, so the place that actually holds the astronauts is not an "egg carton", but rather a structurally-sound cabin.


edit on 4/5/2016 by Soylent Green Is People because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 5 2016 @ 11:43 AM
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Today now, damn right elbowing others out of the queue. Back in the 1960's not on your Nelly!



posted on Apr, 5 2016 @ 11:49 AM
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originally posted by: Soylent Green Is People

originally posted by: StallionDuck

I've seen flat bottom aluminum hull boats more seamless than this.

A boat hull would have more external forces acting against it (water drag as it moved through the water, air drag at it moved through the air) than the LM would encounter.

The LM had virtually no drag forces acting on it in the vacuum of space and the near-vacuum of the Moon, so a taped seam does not need to be perfectly smooth.



I guess that's a really good point. Though what about G-forces?



posted on Apr, 5 2016 @ 11:50 AM
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originally posted by: Soylent Green Is People

originally posted by: ProfessorPatternfish

originally posted by: Jonjonj

originally posted by: ProfessorPatternfish

originally posted by: Jonjonj
a reply to: ProfessorPatternfish

What I take from your post is: Would you have the balls? And it is clear that you personally would not. Don't worry though, neither would I to be honest.

Not so fun-fact. There were only 5 Space Shuttle Orbiters built, 2 of them were destroyed in accidents. Now getting into one of THEM took such balls I am surprised those people could actually walk, both the men AND the women!

SO then, at the end of the day, we have established a lack of balls and not much else really.



Wow you seem to know me so well?

What else do you know about me that I don't?

I am honestly interested.


FYI. If someone. NASA offered me the chance to go into space.

I would rip there arm off and say thanks lets go.


Are you sure? Because your OP says this...



I am curios, in this day and age. With what we know about space exploration. Would anyone really get in this Apollo 11 Lander if was told it goes to the moon? I wouldn't. I would laugh and say; "It looks like it is made of card, left over Christmas wrapping paper and egg cartons".


Good job at least space engineers test for consistency, you clearly don't.




I just wouldn't get in an egg box to go to the moon.

Ill jump in the space shuttle.

Ill even ask if I can have a go on the controls too.

You still haven't explained why you feel that exposed reflective foil insulation on The LM makes it any less space-worthy just because that insulation is exposed.

Besides it not "looking right" to you, what real technical issues do you have with it?

I mean, I've already showed you that the crew cabin is a simple cylindrical pressure vessel, and the rest of the stuff is built around that, so the place that actually holds the astronauts is not an "egg carton", but rather a structurally-sound cabin.



In the UK there was a children's television show called Blue Peter. Every week they would make some useful 'Thing' out of egg boxes and odds and ends.

Because of the time the show was on for. The presenter would pull a fished version of what they was showing one to make and say:

"Here is one I made earlier"

That is exactly what I think when I look at this egg box.

Here is one they made earlier form card on wrapping paper.



posted on Apr, 5 2016 @ 12:02 PM
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If I recall correctly one of the Russians first designs for a lunar lander was an open cockpit.
You would have to wear your space suit from de orbit through landing and back up to rendezvous.

When in space it's function over form every time.
Check out the Russian LK lander.
But remember surface time was expected to be a few hours. 3 maybe ?
So there were no long term thermal issues to worry about.



posted on Apr, 5 2016 @ 12:08 PM
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originally posted by: StallionDuck

originally posted by: Soylent Green Is People

originally posted by: StallionDuck

I've seen flat bottom aluminum hull boats more seamless than this.

A boat hull would have more external forces acting against it (water drag as it moved through the water, air drag at it moved through the air) than the LM would encounter.

The LM had virtually no drag forces acting on it in the vacuum of space and the near-vacuum of the Moon, so a taped seam does not need to be perfectly smooth.



I guess that's a really good point. Though what about G-forces?


Whatever the G-Forces are, the humans inside would need to survive, too. So the G-forces due to acceleration would be kept to a minimum.

The most g-forces they would have felt while operating the LM would have been during the ascent stage liftoff from the moon after they walked on the moon. I can't find the info now, but I think I read it was 3 Gs.

Of course, the craft itself would also need to be strong enough to not have parts shaken loose during the launch from earth and survive those initial launch G-Forces (when the LM was stowed away inside the Saturn V rocket). Those G forces were about 4 Gs (see link here).

However, that just means things need to be attached securely. It still wouldn't matter if the taped seams were not perfect, or if foil insulation was exposed on the outside of the LM, or if pieces of metal shrouding stuck out. The LM never experienced any atmospheric drag, so there would be no forces on it as it was just coasting through space (which is most of the time).

The only times forces would be acting on it would be during the times of acceleration, deceleration, and the force of the landing. But those forces could not be too too great, because the humans inside also needed to survive those forces.

edit on 4/5/2016 by Soylent Green Is People because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 5 2016 @ 12:12 PM
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originally posted by: ProfessorPatternfish
In the UK there was a children's television show called Blue Peter. Every week they would make some useful 'Thing' out of egg boxes and odds and ends.

Because of the time the show was on for. The presenter would pull a fished version of what they was showing one to make and say:

"Here is one I made earlier"

That is exactly what I think when I look at this egg box.

Here is one they made earlier form card on wrapping paper.

Well, that could be because you are not looking at the Lunar Module the same way an engineer would look at it.

An engineer would look past the "visual noise" of the foil and metal coverings and look at the business end of the LM to see what truly makes it tick. You seem to be getting lost in the noise.



posted on Apr, 5 2016 @ 12:20 PM
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a reply to: ProfessorPatternfish

Beyond the odd numbers of post removed for one reason or another, the short answer is the materials were selected for a variety of reasons, weight, the foil helps to protect against radiation, ohh and it was a one time use vehicle, in other words it did not have to be tonka tough so yes I would take that ride.

To all the folks that keep thinking we never went, really??? I have seen regolith samples with my own eyes. Yes we went, yes it was half way suicidal but we did it anyway and for whatever reason it worked. Sometimes we survive stupid ideas, Ben flying a kite in a lightning storm... not common sense, but hey now we have all these cool gizmos that run on... wait for it... Electricity!!!

Grow up and remove the tin foil hat once in a while, it is ok to be a critical thinker, but everything must have it's limits. Ok?
edit on 5-4-2016 by sycomix because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 5 2016 @ 12:30 PM
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I've always kind of throught that.

Then again, look at the ISS. The station looks like a bunch of high school kids slapped a bunch of left over parts from a junk yard. The space station is the most ghetto looking thing I've seen NASA do.

Good thing that's not what our "best" space project is ..


Functionality over form. That's the name of the game. We're used to sci-fi showing us sleek, elegant and eye-pleasing space ships. Well, that's not exactly how it works.

In the real world, how something looks doesn't matter. Keeping you alive?

That does matter.
edit on 5-4-2016 by MystikMushroom because: (no reason given)



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