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Scientist Invents Clothes Fabric That Cleans Itself on Its Own

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posted on Mar, 26 2016 @ 10:00 AM
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What if you beefed this stuff up and made it a spray-on? Then I could dispose of...umm...large "stains of organic origin", say about 18 stone worth, by simply spritzing "Corpse-b-gone" on it and leaving them in the sun for a bit.

Not that I have to often, mind you. But I could see it as useful to have about the house.




posted on Mar, 26 2016 @ 10:04 AM
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a reply to: Bedlam

spray it on a rug that you could roll said stain up into with a few glowsticks. Voila! Stain-B-Gone!

We need Billy Mays to market our new "Stain Disposal Rugs" for us.



posted on Mar, 26 2016 @ 10:09 AM
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a reply to: bigfatfurrytexan

And you could have a lot of variations, like "Chav-a-way!" that lets you get rid of the odd Bucky swigger.

Or "Neck-no-more" to dispose of random rednecks who have one too many cars in the yard.

Something one could add to a swimming pool to dissolve neighbors who let themselves in for a dip while you're gone would be nice too.



posted on Mar, 26 2016 @ 10:42 AM
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a reply to: nonspecific

You mean like these?

Mack Weldon - Silver Boxer Briefs


Combining Pima cotton with Silver XT2, a performance fabric with antimicrobial and anti-odor properties, these boxer briefs were made to keep you cool, dry, and fresh all day long. Imported. 84% Pima Cotton / 10% XT2 / 6% Lycra



posted on Mar, 26 2016 @ 10:45 AM
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a reply to: Bedlam


Something one could add to a swimming pool to dissolve neighbors who let themselves in for a dip while you're gone would be nice too.


Nothing a couple cases of super shock wouldn't fix.



posted on Mar, 26 2016 @ 10:46 AM
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a reply to: swanne

Okay, I'm in.

Now they just have to make it indestructible so my son can't chew through it when he has anxiety attacks and I'll be golden!!




Okay - a bit off topic, but you know the "mysterious metal" that witnesses handled from the Roswell Event? I'm betting that was nano tech as well...a thin metal that would "flow" back into its original shape no matter how you crunched it up...seriously...nanotech...



posted on Mar, 26 2016 @ 01:57 PM
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a reply to: Sublimecraft

I'd like shoes made of that stuff (the "stuff" being the self-cleaning textile, not the skid marks).

Just imagine, shoes that self-clean...



posted on Mar, 26 2016 @ 02:23 PM
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a reply to: Bedlam

Spray cans of the stuff would be fantastic for real uses. No more dog poo. Put the stuff on kitty litter granules. cover the inside of septic tanks with it.

Degreasing. self cleaning ovens. self cleaning instrumentation.



posted on Mar, 26 2016 @ 05:19 PM
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Fact catching up with fiction...






posted on Mar, 26 2016 @ 06:41 PM
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a reply to: swanne These materials speed the oxidation of organic molecules. Fibers are organic. Maybe this should be titled self cleaning and disintegrating fabric.



posted on Mar, 27 2016 @ 03:23 AM
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a reply to: pteridine

I was wondering this.
If the substance breaks down organic molecules would it not also disassemble the garment
it was coated on if said garment was of organic origin such as cotton.
also what would its effects be on the skin of the wearer ? dont think if would be good marketing
to have your models dissolve in front of the camera!
edit on 27/3/16 by ShayneJUK because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 27 2016 @ 03:57 PM
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I have something that gets my clothes clean after I dirty them...
...It's called a wife.
(runs and hides from wife)



posted on Mar, 28 2016 @ 08:24 AM
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originally posted by: ShayneJUK

If the substance breaks down organic molecules would it not also disassemble the garment


If this is true, I guess they'll be using it on clothes made of synthetic fibres.

But then, "organic matter" is a very broad term; I wonder if they have a more narrow definition in mind, one which would exclude cotton.



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