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L.A. officials seeded clouds during El Niño storm in hopes of more rain

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posted on Mar, 11 2016 @ 06:07 AM
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Clouds over Los Angeles County were seeded with silver iodide to increase the amount of rainfall during Monday's storm, marking the first cloud seeding done by the Department of Public Works since 2002.

Los Angeles County has used cloud seeding to boost water supplies since the 1950s, backing off in times of heavy rain or when wildfire devastation creates an outsized risk of flooding or debris flows.

FULL COVERAGE: El


www.latimes.com...


This has been shown around the internet as proof of chemtrails. Just to eliminate any ignorance that may sprout up due to this article, I think it would be good to note that cloud seeding has nothing to do with contrails. It has nothing to do with white lines in the air behind planes at 30,000 feet. It can't be seen from the ground unless it's being done from ground based rockets.
www.weathermodification.com...

cloud seeding isn't secret, and has been done for over 60 years.

Thanks and have a super day!




posted on Mar, 11 2016 @ 07:17 AM
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a reply to: network dude

I find this very interesting, its news to me. The article says machines are set up to shoot the substance into the clouds; where are they shooting and how high?




posted on Mar, 11 2016 @ 07:19 AM
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a reply to: ReadLeader

they usually use silver iodide, or dry ice. they seed the cloud/storm at the top, and try to get the storm that was likely to produce rain already, to make just a bit more and dump it a bit quicker. they can use small planes that use flares, or they can shoot rockets into the cloud from the ground.

It's used to create rain, suppress hail, and make snow. that second link has a bit more info.



posted on Mar, 11 2016 @ 07:28 AM
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a reply to: network dude

How would that affect areas east of L.A.? Would dumping more rain in L.A./Cali cause less rain to dump in Arizona, for example?

I ask because quite often we will have forecasts for rain, and get nothing or very little... we're in a drought too!!!



posted on Mar, 11 2016 @ 07:42 AM
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15% more rainfall....i don't know why, but im a bit suspicious about that figure. That seems fairly high.



posted on Mar, 11 2016 @ 07:44 AM
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originally posted by: Boadicea
a reply to: network dude

How would that affect areas east of L.A.? Would dumping more rain in L.A./Cali cause less rain to dump in Arizona, for example?

I ask because quite often we will have forecasts for rain, and get nothing or very little... we're in a drought too!!!


This is where the whole things gets a little strange. Although cloud seeding is done, the ability for it to rain is kind of questionable. It may have rained without seeding, or the seeding may have made it rain more and earlier than expected. There isn't a real way to verify what works and what nature would have done on her own. So some argue that cloud seeding doesn't really work, while others swear by it.

But using logic and assuming cloud seeding works as advertised, then yes, it's very possible CA stole some rain that was destined for AZ.



posted on Mar, 11 2016 @ 07:44 AM
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I'm a little fuzzy on this, but usually the cycle shifts so one year wetter, next yr drier? I went to look it up and it's predicting a swing to wetter this next winter?

weather.com...

Not like you can count on predictions being accurate. LOL!



posted on Mar, 11 2016 @ 07:45 AM
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originally posted by: 3danimator2014
15% more rainfall....i don't know why, but im a bit suspicious about that figure. That seems fairly high.


Yea, based on what variable? they have been in a severe drought for almost 4 years.



posted on Mar, 11 2016 @ 07:48 AM
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a reply to: network dude

Well drats! I guess that means I can't just blame poor weather forecasters now...

Thanks for the answer -- much appreciated



posted on Mar, 11 2016 @ 07:49 AM
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a reply to: Caver78

I see more of a 3-4 year cycle in this. Out East (eastern NC) we had about 4 years of really dry summers and winters, then the last 2 years about been normal, if not a bit high for rainfall, and before the drought, we had a good run of rainfall. It would be interesting to see the drought/wet years, graphed out for a better idea of what actually happens. memory fades and is a bad thing to use as proof of anything. (at least mine is)



posted on Mar, 11 2016 @ 07:57 AM
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originally posted by: network dude

originally posted by: 3danimator2014
15% more rainfall....i don't know why, but im a bit suspicious about that figure. That seems fairly high.


Yea, based on what variable? they have been in a severe drought for almost 4 years.


I suspect that was the figure given to them by the cloud seeding company to use.



posted on Mar, 11 2016 @ 08:00 AM
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Thank you. I was ready to say I hope cloud seeding is not being called chem trails now.
Logic. Good to see. Again thanks.



posted on Mar, 11 2016 @ 08:10 AM
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a reply to: Sillyolme

Oh it is, but I really wanted to make sure it didn't happen here. this is the last stronghold for ignorance denied. If this castle falls, humanity is doomed.



posted on Mar, 11 2016 @ 08:17 AM
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originally posted by: network dude
a reply to: Sillyolme

Oh it is, but I really wanted to make sure it didn't happen here. this is the last stronghold for ignorance denied. If this castle falls, humanity is doomed.


And yet...no one knows of our valiant struggle to maintain this stronghold. Unknown heroes we are.



posted on Mar, 11 2016 @ 08:19 AM
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a reply to: network dude

Except for that one storm just south of you that KO'd SC!

In my fuzzy memory it sticks out that this winter was warmer and drier, so next winter will maybe be normal or another butt-buster like last yr with extra snow and multiple ice storms.

Call me crazy but aren't they cloud seeding a little late into this yr's storms? They maybe should have started this in December?



posted on Mar, 11 2016 @ 08:34 AM
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a reply to: Caver78

I don't know how the decisions are made. And to be honest, I'm not sure Im 100% believer in if cloud seeding really works. But this kind of takes the wind out of the sails of the idiots who claim "they" engineered the drought. (why would they make it dry, then seed for rain?) But again, what do I know.



posted on Mar, 11 2016 @ 10:20 AM
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a reply to: network dude

ROFL!
My attitude has been if HAARP actually worked the way some of the folks "think" it does, IE modifies weather and causes drought and storms then like a lot of Govt projects it's a dismal failure!

They apparently couldn't hit the broad side of a barn.


DC has remained untouched altho the SC storms were kinda close, missed totally with Sandy, Katrina was a PR nightmare, and the list goes on!

Really? you bombed a few spare miles of Buffalo last year in like 6 ft of snow? Poor Buffalo?? They get creamed anyway, why add salt to that wound?

For the sake of argument, HAARP is a spectacular failure if THAT'S how it was supposed to work!!
Don't get me started on Cern...if they'd of opened that black hole we sure as heck won't be around to discuss it. In fact we wouldn't have time to grab our socks.



posted on Mar, 11 2016 @ 10:30 AM
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a reply to: network dude

This seems like the modern equivalent to damning up a water source upstream from others so that you can have more water, regardless as to how it affects people downstream.

Moisture in the atmosphere put there by the oceans generally has a finite lifespan once it hits land, and if coastal areas "seed" the clouds to create more moisture so that it falls on them instead of taking that humidity/moisture further inland, the inland areas are going to suffer negative consequences concerning their water supply.

That's just me possibly overthinking what's going on here, but I just get really effin' tired of these massive urban areas that allow themselves to get too large and demanding for what natural resources that are locally available, and they end up taking from others because they think that they're too important/big to fail. Maybe I'm just in a feisty mood, but this type of activity is immoral, IMO.

We need to quit dicking around with nature and just adapt to it. You don't have enough rain in your area, find another place to live or limit your use of that resource if you must live there in order to keep up appearances of your status as a human.

ETA: This, of course, is based on IF this is really happening. I'm not totally convinced, but I do think that it's possible.
edit on 11-3-2016 by SlapMonkey because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 11 2016 @ 10:36 AM
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originally posted by: SlapMonkey
a reply to: network dude

This seems like the modern equivalent to damning up a water source upstream from others so that you can have more water, regardless as to how it affects people downstream.

Moisture in the atmosphere put there by the oceans generally has a finite lifespan once it hits land, and if coastal areas "seed" the clouds to create more moisture so that it falls on them instead of taking that humidity/moisture further inland, the inland areas are going to suffer negative consequences concerning their water supply.

That's just me possibly overthinking what's going on here, but I just get really effin' tired of these massive urban areas that allow themselves to get too large and demanding for what natural resources that are locally available, and they end up taking from others because they think that they're too important/big to fail. Maybe I'm just in a feisty mood, but this type of activity is immoral, IMO.

We need to quit dicking around with nature and just adapt to it. You don't have enough rain in your area, find another place to live or limit your use of that resource if you must live there in order to keep up appearances of your status as a human.

ETA: This, of course, is based on IF this is really happening. I'm not totally convinced, but I do think that it's possible.


It's real and does happen, in fact, it happens all over the globe for different reasons, but it isn't really managed well and could screw some out of the rain they were supposed to get. (depending on the validity of seeding)

Being part of the chemtrail debate for years, cloud seeding knowledge is very necessary as it's often lumped in with the subject out of ignorance.

www.weathermodificationinc.com...
edit on 11-3-2016 by network dude because: bad spler



posted on Mar, 11 2016 @ 11:23 AM
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a reply to: network dude

If clouding seeding were effective, wouldn't it alleviate any and all drought? Even some of it? I say FAIL. Drought history throughout the US even in the last 15 years proves we can't control the rain. On the flip side, all the flooding, just look at the last 15 years for an easy search, we can't control it either.

The cloud seeders 'think' they can control rain but they have absolutely no proof they can, have or will. But hey, I'd rather my tax dollars support that effort rather than new crystal ware for the White House or vacations for the POTUS.




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