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Whoa! The Julian Calendar is always ahead of the Gregorian Calendar?

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posted on Feb, 27 2016 @ 11:13 PM
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How fascinating that the Mayan had a solar year of 365 days or a vague solar year but still saw the tropical year in their calculations.

Instead of adding one day every 4 years (leap year), they subtracted 13 days every 52 years or 18980 days.

5/19/2068 minus 18980 days

6/1/2016 minus 18980 days

6/14/1964 minus 18980 days

6/27/1912 minus 18980 days

07/9/1860 minus 18980 days

7/22/1808

and so on..




posted on Feb, 27 2016 @ 11:19 PM
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originally posted by: neutrinostargate
How fascinating that the Mayan had a solar year of 365 days or a vague solar year but still saw the tropical year in their calculations.

Instead of adding one day every 4 years (leap year), they subtracted 13 days every 52 years or 18980 days.

5/19/2068 minus 18980 days

6/1/2016 minus 18980 days

6/14/1964 minus 18980 days

6/27/1912 minus 18980 days

07/9/1860 minus 18980 days

7/22/1808

and so on..


And what is even more fascinating about this is that this is when the calendar round cycle happens! 2016 is the year for it to occur.

This is when the Tzolkin and the Haab calendars sync. It can't happen until another 52 years later. And the calendar round has to do with the Sun Pleiades alignment!

I noticed something very interesting with June 1st, 2016. It is the Tzolkin and the Haab syncing up over 13 days! Never can this be done for any other years or any other combination of days of the Tzolkin with the Haab until 52 years later or before.

June 1st
1 Zots
1 Etznab

June 2nd
2 Zots
2 Cauac

June 3rd
3 Zots
3 Ahau

June 4th
4 Zotz
4 Imix

June 5th
5 Zots
5 Ik

June 6th
6 Zotz
6 Akbal

June 7th
7 Zotz
7 Kan

June 8th
8 Zotz
8 Chicchan

June 9th
9 Zotz
9 Cimi

June 10th
10 Zotz
10 Manik

June 11th
11 Zotz
11 Lamat

June 12th
12 Zotz
12 Muluc

June 13th
13 Zotz
13 Oc



posted on Feb, 27 2016 @ 11:45 PM
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Sept. 6th, 3114 BC (Julian) plus 1,872,000 days = Dec. 21st, 2012 (Gregorian) or Dec. 8th, 2012 (Julian)

Julian Day 2456282.5
Total Days 1,872,000
= 584,283 GMT correlation

Sept. 6th, 3114 BC (Julian) plus 1,872,000 days plus 1258 days = June 1st, 2016 (Gregorian) or May 19th, 2016 (Julian)

Julian Day 2457540.5
Total Days 1,873,258
= 584,283 GMT correlation



posted on Feb, 27 2016 @ 11:57 PM
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originally posted by: neutrinostargate
Sept. 6th, 3114 BC (Julian) plus 1,872,000 days = Dec. 21st, 2012 (Gregorian) or Dec. 8th, 2012 (Julian)

Julian Day 2456282.5
Total Days 1,872,000
= 584,283 GMT correlation

Sept. 6th, 3114 BC (Julian) plus 1,872,000 days plus 1258 days = June 1st, 2016 (Gregorian) or May 19th, 2016 (Julian)

Julian Day 2457540.5
Total Days 1,873,258
= 584,283 GMT correlation


How freaking crazy is that!? When the 13 baktun cycle ends it appears on June 1st, 2016 (Gregorian) or May 20th, 2016 (Julian), the last of the 52 year calendar round cycle ends on that same exact day too!


edit on 27-2-2016 by neutrinostargate because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 28 2016 @ 01:13 PM
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Even though the Mayans used a vague solar year of 365 days, they also understood there were was a leap year.

Like we have leap day about every 4 years and add one extra day, 366 days, the Mayans actually subtracted 13 days every 52 years.

1 leap day every 4 years = 13 total every 52 years.

5128.767 years from the beginning of the 13 baktun cycle until now divide it by 4 = 1282 leap days total plus the first leap year at the beginning of the 13 baktun and this year for the leap year = 1284 leap days total

Then we must add 1284 days to the Mayan Long Count.

August 11th, 3114 BC (Gregorian) plus 1,872,000 days plus 1284 leap days = June 1st, 2016 (Gregorian)!


edit on 28-2-2016 by neutrinostargate because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 28 2016 @ 01:24 PM
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This was stated,

"Whereas, our Gregorian calendar first implemented by Pope Gregory XIII in 1582 A.D. figures the solar year at 365.2425 days (a correction of the Julian calendar figure of 365.25 days), the ancient Maya had calculated their Haab calendar's solar year to be more accurate at 365.2422 days. The great irony here being, it was the combined powers of the Roman Catholic Church authority and the Spanish monarchy who had waged a war of cultural genocide against the natives of Mesoamerica for being the suspect of inferiority; when in fact, many of their mindsets and understandings were centuries ahead of the 16th Century Europeans. Likewise, while our modern world continues to use the calculations of Papal Rome, as of January 1, 2000, our best trained astronomers recently recorded the mean tropical year at 365.2421897 days, which has now put us on par with what the ancient Mayans had already known.

Like all solar calendars of every advanced civilization that has come to develop one, there are certain basic similarities; such as, a need to keep track of the seasons for agriculture, and one perplexing problem which has always existed through the ages. Because the actual length of time it takes for our Sun to re-appear in its exact same positions as seen from Earth is slightly longer than 365 days, periodic adjustments are needed to keep an accumulation of the yearly calendar counts in alignment with the Earth's true revolutions around the Sun. The ancient Mayans approached this problem differently than what we do today. Instead of adding a leap year every 4 years, they subtracted 13 days every 52 years. The Haab calendar has an error of only 1 day in 6729 years, while our modern calendar has an error of just 1 day in 3236 years."

mayan-calendar.org...

It says above the Mayans thought the tropical solar year to be at 365.2422 which would be more accurate to Gregorian solar year at 365.2425.

It also states above that the Haab calendar has an error of only 1 day in 6729 years, while our modern Gregorian calendar has an error of 1 day in 3236 years.

I figured it out more correctly though and the number of years are off a little bit. More to come!

edit on 28-2-2016 by neutrinostargate because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 28 2016 @ 01:50 PM
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The mean tropical solar year is 365.242190

It says it here:

en.wikipedia.org...

365.25 Julian minus 365.242190 mean tropical year = .00781 x 128 years = 1 So every 128 years the Julian drifts from the mean tropical year by 1 day.

It says it here,

"The Julian calendar gains against the mean tropical year at the rate of one day in 128 years. For the Gregorian the figure is one day in 3,226 years."

en.wikipedia.org...

The Gregorian 365.2425 minus mean tropical year 365.242190 = .00031 x 3226 years = 1 So every 3226 years the Gregorian drifts from the mean tropical year by 1 day.

Now for the Mayan!



posted on Feb, 28 2016 @ 04:20 PM
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The article says above that the Mayan Haab is 1 day off 6729 years compared to the tropical solar year.

How did they figure that out?




"Did the Mayas Think a Year Was 365 Days? Although there were only 365 days in the Haab year, the Mayas were aware that a year is slightly longer than 365 days, and in fact, many of the month-names are associated with the seasons; Yaxkin, for example, means "new or strong sun" and, at the beginning of the Long Count, 1 Yaxkin was the day after the winter solstice, when the sun starts to shine for a longer period of time and higher in the sky. When the Long Count was put into motion, it was started at 7.13.0.0.0, and 0 Yaxkin corresponded with Midwinter Day, as it did at 13.0.0.0.0 back in 3114 B.C.E. The available evidence indicates that the Mayas estimated that a 365-day year precessed through all the seasons twice in 7.13.0.0.0 or 1,101,600 days.

We can therefore derive a value for the Mayan estimate of the year by dividing 1,101,600 by 365, subtracting 2, and taking that number and dividing 1,101,600 by the result, which gives us an answer of 365.242036 days, which is slightly more accurate than the 365.2425 days of the Gregorian calendar."


www.webexhibits.org...

Thus, 365.242190 mean tropical year - 365.242036 Mayan tropical year = .000154

.000154 x 6493 years = 1 to be more exact (not 6729 years)

So every 6493 years the Mayan tropical year number drifts by 1 day compared to the mean tropical year.

Thus, the Mayan calendar is much more accurate then the Gregorian.



posted on Feb, 28 2016 @ 04:22 PM
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It says it here too about the Mayan tropical year:

www.timeanddate.com...
edit on 28-2-2016 by neutrinostargate because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 28 2016 @ 09:15 PM
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I just noticed something very interesting with the Mayan calendar. Anyone still interested?



posted on Feb, 28 2016 @ 11:47 PM
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a reply to: neutrinostargate

I think I have already told you that your calculations about May-June 2016 is wrong.

The most famous date 21/12/2012 didn't come out of the blue. I showed you that 21/12/2012 date is based on the so called family of JMT correlations. Also, I showed you that the calculations for JMT theory was done using Julian Day Number count.
Julian Day Number count already took into account leap-years in a great detail, therefore your calculation is redundant.

You can argue about validity of all JMT like theories, in this case please don't use 21/12/2012 date. Show your original theory.
Or prove that JND count made some major errors.

JND count of all days was proposed almost 500 years ago by the guys that also developed our modern Gregorian Calendar.
I can believe that there may be some errors, but highly doubt that in the order of 1500 some days.



posted on Feb, 28 2016 @ 11:56 PM
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originally posted by: kitzik
a reply to: neutrinostargate

I think I have already told you that your calculations about May-June 2016 is wrong.

The most famous date 21/12/2012 didn't come out of the blue. I showed you that 21/12/2012 date is based on the so called family of JMT correlations. Also, I showed you that the calculations for JMT theory was done using Julian Day Number count.
Julian Day Number count already took into account leap-years in a great detail, therefore your calculation is redundant.

You can argue about validity of all JMT like theories, in this case please don't use 21/12/2012 date. Show your original theory.
Or prove that JND count made some major errors.

JND count of all days was proposed almost 500 years ago by the guys that also developed our modern Gregorian Calendar.
I can believe that there may be some errors, but highly doubt that in the order of 1500 some days.


So what is your point? Sure GMT correlation is 584283 on Dec. 21st, 2012. It so happens to be 584283 on June 1st, 2016 by adding in the leap year days. '

You haven't showed my June 1st, 2016 date is wrong.

This is basic, very basic logic. The Gregorian counted leap years. The Mayans don't. Instead of adding 1 day approx every 4 years, they subtracted 13 days over 52 years. They didn't care that the seasons drifted with their New Year date. Do you not understand that? Apparently you don't understand that logic.

5128 years total for the 13 baktun/4 years for 1 leap year gets you 1284 days.

Add in 1284 days from August 11th, 3114 BC and you get to June 1st, 2016.

It doesn't take a genius to see that.

The Mayan calendar is much more accurate then the Gregorian, so you are still adamant that the Mayans should follow the Gregorian calendar method to arrive at the 12/21/12? LOL



posted on Feb, 29 2016 @ 12:01 AM
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a reply to: neutrinostargate




The Mayan calendar is much more accurate then the Gregorian, so you are still adamant that the Mayans should follow the Gregorian calendar method to arrive at the 12/21/12? LOL


I never said that Mayan calendar followed Gregorian or Julian calendar. All Im saying that it is so obvious that all serious researchers ALREADY took leap years into account.



posted on Feb, 29 2016 @ 12:07 AM
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Use this:

www.fourmilab.ch...

Want to know when the Mayan solar New Year was? It is April 1st this year. It is called 0 Pop. The first day of the first month of their calendar.

Want to know when the Mayan solar New Year was back in 2012 or 4 years ago? It was April 2nd. It moved 1 day.

52 years ago or 1964, the New Year solar date for the Mayans was on April 14th.

Instead of adding a leap year, they were actually subtracting 13 days every 52 years.




"Like all solar calendars of every advanced civilization that has come to develop one, there are certain basic similarities; such as, a need to keep track of the seasons for agriculture, and one perplexing problem which has always existed through the ages. Because the actual length of time it takes for our Sun to re-appear in its exact same positions as seen from Earth is slightly longer than 365 days, periodic adjustments are needed to keep an accumulation of the yearly calendar counts in alignment with the Earth's true revolutions around the Sun. The ancient Mayans approached this problem differently than what we do today. Instead of adding a leap year every 4 years, they subtracted 13 days every 52 years. "


mayan-calendar.org...

You can also figure it out this way. 5128.767 years/52 years = 98.63 calendar round cycles x 13 days subtracted = 1282 days or 3 1/2 years roughly.

You see the 3 1/2 year difference from this:

1,872,000 days/365.2425 Gregorian solar year = 5125.36 years

1,872,000 days/365 Mayan Haab solar year = 5128.767 years



posted on Feb, 29 2016 @ 12:09 AM
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originally posted by: kitzik
a reply to: neutrinostargate




The Mayan calendar is much more accurate then the Gregorian, so you are still adamant that the Mayans should follow the Gregorian calendar method to arrive at the 12/21/12? LOL


I never said that Mayan calendar followed Gregorian or Julian calendar. All Im saying that it is so obvious that all serious researchers ALREADY took leap years into account.


Well apparently NOW the Mayan calendar follows the Gregorian because we implemented that Gregorian solar year into the equation, when we should be using the Mayan Haab year.

Don't you get the Mayans didn't care about leap years? So they didn't freaking care or the date of 12/21/12 shouldn't even matter.



posted on Feb, 29 2016 @ 12:11 AM
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a reply to: neutrinostargate

You are drifting away.

Forget about 2012 date and show me your original research how you anchor "real" Mayan calendar with our common calendar.



posted on Feb, 29 2016 @ 12:17 AM
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The Mayans used a vague year of 365 days but were also aware of the tropical solar year. I have shown that their tropical year estimate was even more accurate then the Gregorian solar year.

Again, instead of adding 1 day every approx 4 years, they subtracted it.




" Mayas' Missing Leap Year The ancient Maya, famed for their elaborate and accurate calendar systems, observed two calendar years, but neither seemed to have bothered with a leap year.

"As far as we know, the people of Mesoamerica, the Maya included, didn't care about leap years," said Anthony Aveni, an expert in ancient Mesoamerican astronomy at Colgate University. The Maya solar year of 365 days was central to the agricultural cycle, while their ritual year of 260 days was critical for determining auspicious dates. These calendars were carefully designed to synchronize in 52-year cycles, but no effort was made to prevent "drifting" dates.

"They didn't care if they didn't have a white Christmas, or if their Fourth of July wasn't in the summer, to put it in our terms," Aveni explained. The Maya instead placed priority on marking the passage of time through additional calendar systems such as the Long Count, which unfolds on a cycle more than 5,000 years long.

"Our philosophy about leap year is a complicated scheme to make the seasons jibe with the calendar," Aveni said. "


news.nationalgeographic.com...

I have shown that their solar year (New Year) date of 0 Pop drifted 1 day every 4 years. So over time April 1st, 2016 (New Years Day) for them would be New Years day Nov. 1st .


edit on 29-2-2016 by neutrinostargate because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 29 2016 @ 12:18 AM
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originally posted by: kitzik
a reply to: neutrinostargate

You are drifting away.

Forget about 2012 date and show me your original research how you anchor "real" Mayan calendar with our common calendar.


WTF? I have already shown it. What are you so confused by? Why are you so confused by simple logic?



posted on Feb, 29 2016 @ 12:25 AM
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originally posted by: kitzik
a reply to: neutrinostargate

You are drifting away.

Forget about 2012 date and show me your original research how you anchor "real" Mayan calendar with our common calendar.


Did you read that LA Times article that just came out?

graphics.latimes.com...

Today's date of Feb. 28th, 2016 is July 14th, 2017 if you start removing leap year days beginning 46 BC. Or the assumption, what would it be on our calendar if we didn't have leap years or leap days.

They got to that date of July 14th, 2017 by doing this:

46 BC plus 2016 = 2062 total years/4.123 Gregorian leap year or 1 day every 4.123 years = 500 plus 1 leap day at the beginning date, plus 1 leap day 2016 for this year = 502 days total.

Feb. 28th, 2016 plus 502 days = July 14th, 2017

This same rule of logic applies to figuring out the correct end of the Mayan 13 baktun cycle, BECAUSE THEY DON'T INCLUDE LEAP YEARS or LEAP DAYS!

How hard is that for you to understand?
edit on 29-2-2016 by neutrinostargate because: (no reason given)

edit on 29-2-2016 by neutrinostargate because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 29 2016 @ 12:30 AM
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a reply to: neutrinostargate

No, you didn't show me anything except many factoids about different calendars Mayans were using.

Show me on which date in our modern Gregorian calendar started Mayan long count. Explain me how you arrived to this particular date without using GMT theory. As you may know there are other alternative theories as well, so Im waiting for your explanation.



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