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Did Ancient Egypt Suffer from Climate Change?

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posted on Feb, 2 2016 @ 01:15 AM
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originally posted by: BeefNoMeat

OP, If you haven't heard of John Anthony West and his His college Dr. Robert Schoch. Well, prepare to have your mind blown... West's research has litterally changed the established Egyptological perspective for good. It's taken over 20 years but traditional scholars of Egyptology are submitting more and more to the theories and premise's in his research.


No, they aren't.



Randall Carson and writer, Graham Hancock (Finger Prints of the Gods, and recently, Magicians of the Gods [2015]), have borrowed from Dr. Stoch's research and make a compelling case of a cataclysmic orbiter impact (most likely a comet) over North America bringing on the lower dryas, subsequently given further credence to Dr. Stoch's theory of a wet Sahara resulting in water erosion of the Sphinx some circa 11,000 BCE.



The geologic and paleontological evidence doesn't match up.




posted on Feb, 2 2016 @ 09:11 AM
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Climate change?
Probably not.
But lets consider how old Egyptian cultures and civilization actually are.

It's believed people started living there almost 8-9000 years ago. first sort of major settlements were around 3-3500 years ago, and the start of the grand structures and civilization was around 3 - 2500 years ago, all BCE.
That's pretty damn old! It's not documented in hundreds of years, but thousands.

A major devastating climate change due to natural processes was bound to happen at least once, and if that had no effect then the migration of the Nile towards the east certainly did. There is evidence strewed all along the Nile suggesting that most structures and features were actually built a lot closer to a waters edge than where they sit now, for example there are large levees on one side of the Giza pyramids (not directly attached but close nearby), and evidence of channels for running water. Now the Nile is roughly 5 miles away from the pyramids, this would have a huge impact on any settlement or structure made 4500 years ago.



posted on Feb, 3 2016 @ 02:27 PM
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originally posted by: Byrd

originally posted by: BeefNoMeat

OP, If you haven't heard of John Anthony West and his His college Dr. Robert Schoch. Well, prepare to have your mind blown... West's research has litterally changed the established Egyptological perspective for good. It's taken over 20 years but traditional scholars of Egyptology are submitting more and more to the theories and premise's in his research.


No, they aren't.



Randall Carson and writer, Graham Hancock (Finger Prints of the Gods, and recently, Magicians of the Gods [2015]), have borrowed from Dr. Stoch's research and make a compelling case of a cataclysmic orbiter impact (most likely a comet) over North America bringing on the lower dryas, subsequently given further credence to Dr. Stoch's theory of a wet Sahara resulting in water erosion of the Sphinx some circa 11,000 BCE.



The geologic and paleontological evidence doesn't match up.


Bummer, I did enjoy the JRE interview.

Considering the time you've been a member, it stands to reason you'd have the "quote" feature nailed down - that first paragraph you responded to was not mine and what I respond with wasn't a ringing endorsement - and misattribution wouldn't be an issue. At any rate, it's going to take a boatload of new, certifiable evidence/information to change the accepted timeline of mankind's ascendency to civilization and high culture, overnight. I know you didn't get that "fsme" label for nothing, so mind throwing me a bone and briefly detailing what geological and paleontological evidence these two aren't correctly matching up?



posted on Feb, 4 2016 @ 07:51 AM
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Yes I believe some big event changed everything in Egypt, a few year ago I read a book by Dr. Lana Cantrell called the greatest story never told. In that Lana, talks of microbiological studies that point to the fact that the Nile all of a sudden became highly poisonous. In her mind boggling book she cross refers ancient text with micro biological studies. I cant say how valid it all is, but it kind of made sense for me that some big changes happened, then the ones that survived those big changes were lacking in the knowledge that existed beforehand.
www.bibliotecapleyades.net..." target="_blank" class="postlink" rel="nofollow">Lsns Cantrell




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