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Did Ancient Egypt Suffer from Climate Change?

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posted on Feb, 1 2016 @ 06:13 PM
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That is just the title of the article, and it points to natural climate change along with a host of reasons the era of the Old Kingdom (2649--2150 BC) may have fallen.

It shows parallels between civilization then and now, which are very similar. Special interests, a bad economy, and bad weather. New information found after the discovery of the tomb of Queen Khentkaus III.

source


"(It was) a crucial period when the Old Kingdom started to face major critical factors: The rise of democracy, the horrific impact of nepotism and the role played by interest groups," he says, adding that climate change also played a role in bringing an end to not only the Old Kingdom empire, but those in the Middle East and Western Europe at that time.




posted on Feb, 1 2016 @ 06:26 PM
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Yes they did- if the Pharaohs would have only raised taxes on the Egyptians and implemented carbon credits they'd still be around today.



posted on Feb, 1 2016 @ 06:30 PM
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originally posted by: reldra
That is just the title of the article, and it points to natural climate change along with a host of reasons the era of the Old Kingdom (2649--2150 BC) may have fallen.

It shows parallels between civilization then and now, which are very similar. Special interests, a bad economy, and bad weather. New information found after the discovery of the tomb of Queen Khentkaus III.

source


"(It was) a crucial period when the Old Kingdom started to face major critical factors: The rise of democracy, the horrific impact of nepotism and the role played by interest groups," he says, adding that climate change also played a role in bringing an end to not only the Old Kingdom empire, but those in the Middle East and Western Europe at that time.


I would say so .. there's lots of evidence that ancient Egypt was much more lush and greener than it is now .. clearly the climate changed... natural climate change does happen.. I'm just not ready to say that what we have now is natural climate change ( at least not entirely ) ... just throwing that out there..



posted on Feb, 1 2016 @ 06:39 PM
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No unless they had crazy, out-of-bounds, mindless Political Correctness running amok
in the land!

And, I am sure they were much smarted than the people of today claiming such B.S.

IMO



posted on Feb, 1 2016 @ 06:42 PM
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a reply to: reldra

Neat find, it does make sense that many factors caused the end of the ancient major civilizations.

I know the Nile itself has moved and that at one time waters flowed into where the pyramids were.




posted on Feb, 1 2016 @ 06:45 PM
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originally posted by: Sostratus
Yes they did- if the Pharaohs would have only raised taxes on the Egyptians and implemented carbon credits they'd still be around today.


Hmmm..,,must be/sarc. The carbon credits scheme has been dead as a real thing for sometime now.



posted on Feb, 1 2016 @ 06:46 PM
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originally posted by: miniatus

originally posted by: reldra
That is just the title of the article, and it points to natural climate change along with a host of reasons the era of the Old Kingdom (2649--2150 BC) may have fallen.

It shows parallels between civilization then and now, which are very similar. Special interests, a bad economy, and bad weather. New information found after the discovery of the tomb of Queen Khentkaus III.

source


"(It was) a crucial period when the Old Kingdom started to face major critical factors: The rise of democracy, the horrific impact of nepotism and the role played by interest groups," he says, adding that climate change also played a role in bringing an end to not only the Old Kingdom empire, but those in the Middle East and Western Europe at that time.


I would say so .. there's lots of evidence that ancient Egypt was much more lush and greener than it is now .. clearly the climate changed... natural climate change does happen.. I'm just not ready to say that what we have now is natural climate change ( at least not entirely ) ... just throwing that out there..

True. Now it is probably both.



posted on Feb, 1 2016 @ 06:47 PM
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originally posted by: anon72
No unless they had crazy, out-of-bounds, mindless Political Correctness running amok
in the land!

And, I am sure they were much smarted than the people of today claiming such B.S.

IMO


Not relevant to this.



posted on Feb, 1 2016 @ 06:48 PM
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originally posted by: hubrisinxs
a reply to: reldra

Neat find, it does make sense that many factors caused the end of the ancient major civilizations.

I know the Nile itself has moved and that at one time waters flowed into where the pyramids were.



I did not know it moved, but from the article I know it once flooded and helped crops a lot more.



posted on Feb, 1 2016 @ 06:57 PM
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a reply to: reldra

If you like Egyptian Archeology then here is a neat article calledThe Nile on the Move.

Neat pictures and good science to back the archeology. Not sure if the movement had much to do with the falling of the Egyptians at the end of the Old Kingdom (2649--2150 BC). With that being said, I do think that the article was right in that



Already, though, [Barta] notes some similarities between the world Khentkaus occupied and our own.


Our environment is in trouble... if we are not careful mother nature will clean things up for us and drop our population back down to like 2000 people.




posted on Feb, 1 2016 @ 06:58 PM
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a reply to: reldra

Those days it was raining cats and dogs, and since it was biblical times you can take that litteral



posted on Feb, 1 2016 @ 07:05 PM
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originally posted by: reldra

Hmmm..,,must be/sarc. The carbon credits scheme has been dead as a real thing for sometime now.


well not really

And sure ancient Egypt had climate change.

All natural.




posted on Feb, 1 2016 @ 07:13 PM
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originally posted by: xuenchen

originally posted by: reldra

Hmmm..,,must be/sarc. The carbon credits scheme has been dead as a real thing for sometime now.


well not really

And sure ancient Egypt had climate change.

All natural.



It is different from the original plan. Which was bad. I think it was Ketsuko that posted a video months ago, it is not the same scheme as that was.


edit on 1-2-2016 by reldra because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 1 2016 @ 07:14 PM
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originally posted by: hubrisinxs
a reply to: reldra

If you like Egyptian Archeology then here is a neat article calledThe Nile on the Move.

Neat pictures and good science to back the archeology. Not sure if the movement had much to do with the falling of the Egyptians at the end of the Old Kingdom (2649--2150 BC). With that being said, I do think that the article was right in that



Already, though, [Barta] notes some similarities between the world Khentkaus occupied and our own.


Our environment is in trouble... if we are not careful mother nature will clean things up for us and drop our population back down to like 2000 people.


I will look at that, ty



posted on Feb, 1 2016 @ 07:21 PM
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This is pretty interesting, I don't know much about this but I know the Nile does flood those lands, I've read that it has also moved some, but with that, was the Sphinx underwater really? I'm not sure if the climate change would be the fall of a civilization like that, but the treatment of the people may have caused that....thanks for the information.



posted on Feb, 1 2016 @ 07:46 PM
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a reply to: rowdyrich

The base of the Sphinx has been proven to show signs of water weathering, not flood erosion. This means weathering from rain.

OP, If you haven't heard of John Anthony West and his His college Dr. Robert Schoch. Well, prepare to have your mind blown... West's research has litterally changed the established Egyptological perspective for good. It's taken over 20 years but traditional scholars of Egyptology are submitting more and more to the theories and premise's in his research.

This is only part 1 of 8...



Also check out his book 'Serpent in the Sky'
edit on 1-2-2016 by rexsblues because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 2 2016 @ 12:27 AM
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a reply to: rexsblues

I will watch it. TY



posted on Feb, 2 2016 @ 12:40 AM
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originally posted by: rexsblues
a reply to: rowdyrich

The base of the Sphinx has been proven to show signs of water weathering, not flood erosion. This means weathering from rain.

OP, If you haven't heard of John Anthony West and his His college Dr. Robert Schoch. Well, prepare to have your mind blown... West's research has litterally changed the established Egyptological perspective for good. It's taken over 20 years but traditional scholars of Egyptology are submitting more and more to the theories and premise's in his research.

This is only part 1 of 8...



Also check out his book 'Serpent in the Sky'


Randall Carson and writer, Graham Hancock (Finger Prints of the Gods, and recently, Magicians of the Gods [2015]), have borrowed from Dr. Stoch's research and make a compelling case of a cataclysmic orbiter impact (most likely a comet) over North America bringing on the lower dryas, subsequently given further credence to Dr. Stoch's theory of a wet Sahara resulting in water erosion of the Sphinx some circa 11,000 BCE.



posted on Feb, 2 2016 @ 12:42 AM
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The climate has never stopped changing and we are still in an ice age so yes it will get Warner.



posted on Feb, 2 2016 @ 01:08 AM
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originally posted by: reldra
That is just the title of the article, and it points to natural climate change along with a host of reasons the era of the Old Kingdom (2649--2150 BC) may have fallen.

It shows parallels between civilization then and now, which are very similar. Special interests, a bad economy, and bad weather. New information found after the discovery of the tomb of Queen Khentkaus III.

source


Well, yes... but the article's badly written and the evidence is not well presented and it looks like a fairly fluffy piece.

Around 5,000 BC, the Sahara desert began to spread widely as the climate changed. People were driven into river valleys and towards lakes and the ocean because their only way of adapting to a changed climate was to move.

The fall of the Old Kingdom was due to the redistribution of power (from a sole king into a king with "sole companions" who ran the country as an elite bureaucracy). Pepi II had a long reign (almost 80 years) but one that was fraught by controversy - there were two attempts on his life during his reign. As the former "sole companions" gathered more and more power, contestants to the throne arose.

Pepi II outlived them all... and he outlived almost all of the children that he sired. His son (who was old when Pepi II died) took the throne and reigned for just over a year before his death.

It was the lack of heirs that caused chaos and the rise of the second Intermediate Period, where they struggled for rule between the north and the south. The droughts DID impact considerably... but there was more to it than that.




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