It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

chicago cops bust in door, show no warrant, and shoots family dog

page: 1
38
<<   2  3 >>

log in

join
share:
+17 more 
posted on Jan, 28 2016 @ 12:03 PM
link   
what is up with the chicago police department? once again, like the lacquan case, they stone wall in releasing any documents in this case. citing they can't due to an ongoing investigation. yet any and all supposed charges were dropped!

cops bust down door, they say they have a warrant and do not show it. man is home with his 2 autistic children family dog is naturally defending home turf. man is holding dog and wants to put him in another room. cops demand, at gun point, release the dog. man complies and cops then shoot dog in front of children!

www.huffingtonpost.com...

my last four years in the service, i was military police. up until the past couple of years, i usually was supportive and respected of police because of my association.
not any more!




posted on Jan, 28 2016 @ 12:08 PM
link   
Hmm. Perhaps this man should've formed sort of militia group with armed individuals, to take over some group of land that wasn't theirs - but I digress, for having your own animals in your own home is nothing more than target practice for some.

And, as always, the police are refusing to release/turn over records. Of course.

"If you've done nothing wrong, you have nothing to hide."

Unless you're a cop who has broken the law, then we'll hide that evidence for you.


+4 more 
posted on Jan, 28 2016 @ 12:15 PM
link   

originally posted by: blackthorne
cops demand, at gun point, release the dog. man complies and cops then shoot dog


Sick.

If you shoot an aggressive police dog on your property, you'll go to prison for twenty years. The cops that come into people homes and onto people's property and kill their pets will never be held to that kind of accountability. It doesn't matter why they were in the home, it was needless. Especially considering the man had control of the dog.


+1 more 
posted on Jan, 28 2016 @ 12:22 PM
link   
a reply to: blackthorne
Sad to say, but this seems like textbook police work, or what passes for it nowadays.

Years ago, a search warrant was a bigger deal, it wasn't a matter of shoving a paper under the nose of a half-drunk judge and telling him to sign it.
Years ago, cops didn't pull no knock home invasions.


+3 more 
posted on Jan, 28 2016 @ 12:31 PM
link   
a reply to: butcherguy

The Department of Education has a SWAT team, as well as 80+ other federal agencies.

I surely can't be the only one who sees this as absurd?

As another poster stated, if us mere peons harm/kill a police K-9 unit - that's a big no no.

Yet I can recall stories of LEO's leaving their K-9 units in hot cars and eventually succumbing to the heat, and that's all good, man! I can recall two stories from Indiana/Minnesota in which an LEO was caught on camera ABUSING their K-9 units, and again - it's all good!

Absolutely sickening.



posted on Jan, 28 2016 @ 12:44 PM
link   
that the charges were dropped on the resident and yet they say the investigation is ongoing? what the hell?

and what is up with police? they are SUPPOSED to be brave men and women. yet we constantly hear, "i was afraid for my life!"! it IS A DANGEROUS job! if you are so fearful, don't be a cop! what happened to police arriving and EVALUATING the situation? then finding the RIGHT way to handle the situation? that is REAL bravery! that little saying has sadly given carte blanche to police forces.



posted on Jan, 28 2016 @ 12:50 PM
link   
a reply to: blackthorne

As a person who spent 30 years in Chicago until moving away just recently, this sounds about right, sadly...



posted on Jan, 28 2016 @ 12:53 PM
link   
The police must have, as a prerequisite to becoming a servant of the state, the type of personality and ability to deal with adverse situations that it seems these officers do not have.

Why should the public have to deal with basically crazy people that possess the authority to ruin their lives, just because they can?

I don't live in the US but it really, really annoys me to see such callous behaviour by those who are entrusted to protect their peers. Make no bones about it, the police are supposed to be our peers.

Sickening really.



posted on Jan, 28 2016 @ 01:00 PM
link   
Heres what i dont get, in most civilised countrys animals have to be treated humanely, most owners like myself treat them as part of the family, as they are. pets are a great tool to teach children valuable life lessons in repect companionship etc.
what i dont understand is how someone can come into your home and kill what is basically a member of your family which depending on the type of relationship/role the dog has in the house, also if children are involved the emotional effects could be devestating.



posted on Jan, 28 2016 @ 01:01 PM
link   
a reply to: blackthorne

Well, at first, I was going to blame it on a possible lack of education, (our PD used to allow am associates degree) until an expert in Law Enforcement came and consulted us; basically in short, they moved the requirements to a 4 yr degree, PERIOD.


The consultant said that across the U.S. the civil liability is much, much less with an officer w/ a 4yr as opposed to a 2yr degree... weird...

But after reading the article a few more times, naw... their just sloppy and their training (or lack-thereof) and continuous training probably is non-existent
poor dog and kiddos.....



posted on Jan, 28 2016 @ 01:07 PM
link   

originally posted by: blackthorne
that the charges were dropped on the resident and yet they say the investigation is ongoing? what the hell?

and what is up with police? they are SUPPOSED to be brave men and women. yet we constantly hear, "i was afraid for my life!"! it IS A DANGEROUS job! if you are so fearful, don't be a cop! what happened to police arriving and EVALUATING the situation? then finding the RIGHT way to handle the situation? that is REAL bravery! that little saying has sadly given carte blanche to police forces.


STEROID TESTS!!! DRUG TESTS!!!! Random and run and directed by a citizen run group!

I have never in my 53 years on this planet seen so many roided up looking cops as I do today! Grant you body building is a thing today, but when I see how big some of these cops are? Come on!

EDIT: Let's not just point the finger at them either! Their current working environment/training and protection from prosecution by our state and federal government should take the brunt of the heat! Not those who they conveniently trained!

When a government official acts horrified over a police officers actions, they need look no further than in their own mirror if they are being honest about why and how this is happening with such frequency!
edit on 28-1-2016 by seeker1963 because: (no reason given)

edit on 28-1-2016 by seeker1963 because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 28 2016 @ 01:11 PM
link   
a reply to: blackthorne

They are not police, they are what is usually and wrongly referred to as Bastards, but for some reason it seems apt.



posted on Jan, 28 2016 @ 01:13 PM
link   
a reply to: blackthorne

First, don't let the bad stories in the media make you dislike or refuse to back all police all the time--I used to work closely with the MPs and CID (was JAG and worked in both Criminal Law and Trial Defense during my career), and I have seen a few bad apples in every unit, but most are good guys. Same with cops in places I have lived. My point is that you need to look at each case individually and determine the merits of the actions separately.

That said, LEOs don't have to show the warrant unless it is requested by the home owner, and I see no evidence that the owner requested to see it at the time.

Secondly, the issue about shooting the dog is hearsay on both sides at this point, as the stories conflict, apparently, so at this time with the evidence that this story provides, it's a moot point.

However, the denial to release the documents after the case was dismissed in court seems quite fishy to me, although a dismissal is not the same as an acquittal, so maybe the case is still open and they will try again for a conviction. But still, I think that the accused in any case should be allowed access to all police documents pertaining to their case, especially since we have a right to defend ourselves in a court of law. That stinks to high heaven and does imply intent to hide something on behalf of the police department, but hell, this is Chicago, and quite honestly, I expect nothing less.



posted on Jan, 28 2016 @ 01:15 PM
link   
a reply to: seeker1963

I say start with more thorough mental evaluations first, then worry about the roids--that'd fix most of the problems right there.



posted on Jan, 28 2016 @ 01:15 PM
link   
a reply to: seeker1963

But cops, especially unions, say that drug tests are "Unconsitutional," and a "violation of their privacy."

I'm all for individual freedom, but in my not so humble opinion - the ONE profession that should do mandatory and regular drug tests are LEO's.

I mean - people want others to pass a piss test to flip a patty, why would we NOT want a profession that gives out free work vehicles, and weapons to drug test their employees? It seems silly to me. I've stocked cereal boxes on grocery stores and had to pass a drug test to do that.

Anyways, it takes longer for one to become a plumber than a police officer. I have a very close childhood friend who has always dreamt of becoming a police officer, I'm nearly positive he wouldn't be able to recite off The Bill of Rights.

Also worth noting, LEO's that brag about bench-pressing other 400 lbs yet still resort to violence/aggression when being confronted by a "hostile," person, in this case - a 100 lb student who was body slammed by said officer.

How about being choked to death for selling un-taxed cigarettes?

That guy faced a more harsh penalty than the LEO who raped fourteen women! It's simply insane!



posted on Jan, 28 2016 @ 01:20 PM
link   
a reply to: RomeByFire


I'm all for individual freedom, but in my not so humble opinion - the ONE profession that should do mandatory and regular drug tests are LEO's.


Make that 2! Add the politicians and lawyers who are responsible for making and upholding the law! I look at the courthouse/judicial system as I would a Catholic church being run by a pedophile priest!



posted on Jan, 28 2016 @ 01:26 PM
link   
a reply to: SlapMonkey

agree, slap. i do thank police when i see them for doing a stressful job. it is just very discouraging to constantly hear stories like these. there are many good cops out there. buuuuut, then they should step up to the plate and root out the corruption in their own ranks. when all there is is silence, then they too are part of the problem. the bluewall/line needs to come down.



posted on Jan, 28 2016 @ 01:37 PM
link   
a reply to: blackthorne

True.

I've mentioned before on ATS that I have a close friend who moved from KY to CA and became a LEO in Modesto. He was just recognized by the city for saving someone's life. He is a great human being, and I really hope that being on that side of the blue line does not change that. I'd be lying if I didn't say that I will get more concerned the longer he is there--but I have no reason to believe that particular city has a corruption problem, so like I mentioned, I'll take it as it comes and hope for the best without resorting to assumptions.



posted on Jan, 28 2016 @ 01:46 PM
link   

originally posted by: blackthorne
a reply to: SlapMonkey

agree, slap. i do thank police when i see them for doing a stressful job. it is just very discouraging to constantly hear stories like these. there are many good cops out there. buuuuut, then they should step up to the plate and root out the corruption in their own ranks. when all there is is silence, then they too are part of the problem. the bluewall/line needs to come down.


The problem with saying that there are many good cops out there kind of ignores the main issue doesn't it? The main point here I think is that there are people in a position to help or to hinder in a social way.

Now given the fact that hindering society as a whole is frowned upon, and even punished in some cases (think about those who cause social unrest) shouldn't those whose responsibility it is to help society be those most qualified, whether by training or simple ability?

In effect, shouldn't the police force have, as their raison d'etre, to protect and NOT harm society?

It seems to me as if the police in many ways are more interested in doing what they CAN do, rather than doing what they SHOULD do.

Some have mentioned that the guilt does not only lie with the police, and I completely agree. After all, you can not expect a brain surgeon to torture a criminal and know what that entails as a job, but by the same token you should not expect a thug to be a policeman, with all that that entails.

Too many thugs becoming policemen it seems, and too little in the way of selection and training processes compound the issue.



posted on Jan, 28 2016 @ 02:00 PM
link   
a reply to: [post=20308610]Jonjonj[/post

well said. with the above example posted by readleader, many departments across the country actually not hire people who are above average in intelligence for police forces. would think that would be what one would want in a person who is entrusted for protecting the populace.

but then again, when it is all about how many arrests and convictions that matter as opposed to actual justice, sadly, this is what we get.



new topics

top topics



 
38
<<   2  3 >>

log in

join