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Frozen Animal Brought Back to Life After 30 Years

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posted on Jan, 22 2016 @ 01:40 AM
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a reply to: operayt

So, would they be space creatures or earth creatures?




posted on Jan, 22 2016 @ 01:43 AM
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a reply to: TrueBrit
I wonder if it's just one specific kind of algae that it feeds on. I've read about algae blooms that wipe out bodies of water because fertilizers or whatever have been dumped into them; blue green algae or red algae. If it feeds on just algae in general, I could they be dumped into the problem area and be used to clean it up or would it be a situation like in the song There Was an Old Woman Who Swallowed a Fly, where the problem just gets worse.



posted on Jan, 22 2016 @ 02:02 AM
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a reply to: Skid Mark

I do not know.

But it would be marvellously interesting to find out, don't you think?



posted on Jan, 22 2016 @ 02:11 AM
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a reply to: Wide-Eyes

Perhaps this?




posted on Jan, 22 2016 @ 02:25 AM
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a reply to: Skid Mark

The article states they eat moss, they suck juices from the plant. They will eat tiny animals called nematodes and rotifers that also live in moss. They will also eat other tardigrades.


ETA:

Uhhmmmm, okay...... they're EVERYWHERE. There are at least 1,000 known varieties. We most likely ingest them on a daily basis!


If you eat fresh lettuce, you've probably done the experiment already.

Tardigrades are pretty ubiquitous in nature and you can collect plenty of them from freshly cut lettuce, spinach and other garden greens, as demonstrated by the North Carolina Museum of Natural Sciences in Raleigh in a citizen science activity.

Just don't tell your vegetarian friends.

www.quora.com...
< br />


edit on 22-1-2016 by StoutBroux because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 22 2016 @ 02:35 AM
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originally posted by: Wide-Eyes
a reply to: DOCHOLIDAZE1

Ikr, it reminds me of something but I can't place it.


vacuum cleaner bag...half full ?



posted on Jan, 22 2016 @ 05:53 AM
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There's a frog that does the same thing, coats its cells in sugars and freezes solid for the winter. I remember it upset the god people when it was discovered!



posted on Jan, 22 2016 @ 06:30 AM
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originally posted by: StoutBroux

It makes me wonder what will be found and what might be released when scientists expose some the areas being researched in the deep frozen areas, that have been that way for thousands of years.

This article is about reviving a Tardigrade back to life After 30 Years. I thought you can revive a Tardigrade back to life after 100 years. It seems that this is just one replication of old experiments.


In 1948, the Italian zoologist Tina Franceschi claimed that tardigrades found in dried moss from museum samples over 120 years old could be reanimated. After rehydrating a tardigrade, she observed one of its front legs moving. This finding has never been replicated. But it does not seem impossible.

www.bbc.com...



posted on Jan, 22 2016 @ 07:18 AM
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originally posted by: Skid Mark
a reply to: Brotherman
Well the article says they eat algae. I wonder what else they eat. Dead matter? I'm not sure if they would poop enough to really fertilize anything. I'm not sure what benefit they would provide really.

I guess what I was driving at before is the thought these creatures are self sustained internally being they dont appear to have natural predators, they are global and don't destroy the environment around them. I dont know what this means if anything but i find it unique.



posted on Jan, 22 2016 @ 08:50 AM
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a reply to: StoutBroux

OMFG LOOK AT YOUR GIFF ANIMATED AVATAR!
Is that for real?

Holy moly.

^5.



posted on Jan, 22 2016 @ 08:52 AM
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Then it could not have been truly dead. It had to be in some kind of stasis. It's cute though. Looks like a stuffed animal.



posted on Jan, 22 2016 @ 10:37 AM
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well something eats them nematodes. and nematodes get eaten by a variety of animals



posted on Jan, 22 2016 @ 12:28 PM
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originally posted by: gmoneystunt

originally posted by: StoutBroux

It makes me wonder what will be found and what might be released when scientists expose some the areas being researched in the deep frozen areas, that have been that way for thousands of years.

This article is about reviving a Tardigrade back to life After 30 Years. I thought you can revive a Tardigrade back to life after 100 years. It seems that this is just one replication of old experiments.


In 1948, the Italian zoologist Tina Franceschi claimed that tardigrades found in dried moss from museum samples over 120 years old could be reanimated. After rehydrating a tardigrade, she observed one of its front legs moving. This finding has never been replicated. But it does not seem impossible.

www.bbc.com...



Well, the article I linked is the first one I've read regarding them. From what I've found out since starting this thread, you are most likely correct. Which, makes them even more fascinating. I've read they can survive two minutes in a microwave. What does that tell you? Thanks for the link btw, more info for me.

For such a significant creature, they don't seem to be as popular as they should be. Not by scientific standards as there have been several papers about them as I have discovered. But I think the general populous hasn't had a whole lot of exposure to them. People are just now noticing these animals that are everywhere but virtually unnoticed.

I think they're cool as heck. They even beat out 'Sea Monkeys' I so desperately wanted to own when I was a kid reading comic books and such back in the day.

I guess I'm all gung ho about them because I have just "discovered" them and the info about them have blown my little mind.



posted on Jan, 23 2016 @ 05:30 PM
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I think this is amazing simply in terms of what it could mean for potential life on other planets. If this biological organism can survive and thrive in the vaccum of space then this would theoretically mean that there could be potentially more evolved organisms that also can adapt and survive on planets (or space) with no atmosphere......... anyone?



posted on Jan, 23 2016 @ 05:45 PM
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It's a cryptobiosis and in its cryptobiotic state it can prolong its lifespan indefinitely.

I think a waterbear could be the key to long human space travel to other planets..

The new vanilla sky.?



posted on Jan, 23 2016 @ 06:32 PM
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a reply to: StoutBroux
I love your new avatar. Watching it swim over and over like that is cool. The "snout" popping in and out like that makes me laugh for some odd reason.



posted on Jan, 23 2016 @ 08:35 PM
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originally posted by: geezlouise
a reply to: StoutBroux

OMFG LOOK AT YOUR GIFF ANIMATED AVATAR!
Is that for real?

Holy moly.

^5.


I believe so. However, I copied it because it was fitting to my thread and all the new info I am learning.

Thanks



posted on Jan, 23 2016 @ 08:36 PM
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a reply to: StoutBroux




They even beat out 'Sea Monkeys' I so desperately wanted to own when I was a kid reading comic books and such back in the day.

At least you can see brine shrimp.

As a kid I raised them to feed my aquarium fish.


edit on 1/23/2016 by Phage because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 23 2016 @ 08:53 PM
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originally posted by: geezlouise
a reply to: StoutBroux

Is that for real?


I think a better question is, is that you in your avatar, a random pic you grabbed from the net, or a pic of your significant other..?

If it's you, hit me up on the DL....that's code for u2u.




posted on Jan, 23 2016 @ 08:59 PM
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originally posted by: StoutBroux

originally posted by: geezlouise
a reply to: StoutBroux

OMFG LOOK AT YOUR GIFF ANIMATED AVATAR!
Is that for real?

Holy moly.

^5.


I believe so. However, I copied it because it was fitting to my thread and all the new info I am learning.

Thanks


Stout you gotta watch Cosmos: A Spacetime Odyssey. Neil does a piece about them.




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