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Name that Boeing.

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posted on Dec, 10 2015 @ 07:34 PM
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Here is my submission
edit on 10-12-2015 by TripSquared314 because: nothing




posted on Dec, 10 2015 @ 07:39 PM
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originally posted by: Sammamishman
a reply to: F4guy

Bingo! For extra credit, what's the pod above the windscreen?


It looks like a FLIR head.



posted on Dec, 10 2015 @ 07:45 PM
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originally posted by: TripSquared314


Here is my submission


Boeing Pelican, but it never was produced.



posted on Dec, 10 2015 @ 07:47 PM
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originally posted by: Sammamishman
a reply to: Imagewerx

How about another. Zaph I know you know this one.



YC-14.



posted on Dec, 10 2015 @ 07:53 PM
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originally posted by: Imagewerx

originally posted by: F4guy

originally posted by: Imagewerx

originally posted by: Sammamishman
a reply to: Imagewerx

....or how about this one:



Is it the grotesque lovechild of a 707 and a Pilatus Turbo Porter?


No, it's a Boeing 720 being used as a testbed for a Pratt & Whitney Canada PT-6 turboprop.


So I was right about the engine from a Turbo Porter
.


Maybe, maybe not. The Turbo Porters I flew out of Thailand were powered by the Turbomeca Astazou engines. The PT-6 was used on various B models and not the As



posted on Dec, 10 2015 @ 07:53 PM
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a reply to: F4guy

It was the relocated radar from the nose.



posted on Dec, 10 2015 @ 09:18 PM
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a reply to: Zaphod58

C-17 was a descendant of the YC-15. They even pulled it from Pima Air museum,and restored it to flying condition. I don't remember what happened but it didn't end up working out well for the YC-15.



posted on Dec, 10 2015 @ 09:24 PM
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a reply to: Stngray

The -15 that went to Pima was restored to flight and used to support the C-17 program until it suffered significant damage during a flight. It's at Edwards.

Instead of moving the other to Pima, which was right by where it was stored, it was destroyed in place.



posted on Dec, 10 2015 @ 09:26 PM
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a reply to: Zaphod58
I remember taking a bus tour of DM and seeing the other one. Last time I was at Pima they still had the YC-14 sans engines.



posted on Dec, 10 2015 @ 10:00 PM
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posted on Dec, 10 2015 @ 10:05 PM
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a reply to: RadioRobert

YB-40



posted on Dec, 10 2015 @ 10:31 PM
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Name it?

O.K: I dub it the Boeing Boing! Boing!



posted on Dec, 10 2015 @ 10:57 PM
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a reply to: Imagewerx

So anyway, shortened history lesson as I can't get on my laptop right now to do it right.

The E-6 has two Trailing Wire Antennas. One is stowed in the aft fuselage, the other is that red piece under the vertical fin. In flight they extend several miles behind the aircraft. When they want to send a message to the sub the entire wire, plus the metal cone on the end becomes the antenna for the signal.

The EC-135 used to have one under the fuselage near the main landing gear. The E-4 utilizes them as well.
edit on 12/10/2015 by Zaphod58 because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 11 2015 @ 07:29 AM
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a reply to: Zaphod58

I wonder how many times those antennas broke off and took power out to small town America or ended up at the bottom of the ocean? I can imagine the drag on those things is immense.
edit on 11-12-2015 by Sammamishman because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 11 2015 @ 10:04 AM
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I can picture some poor linesman trying to figure out where an extra miles of wire came from.



posted on Dec, 11 2015 @ 10:40 AM
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a reply to: Sammamishman

We lost a few. They're a serious pain in the ass to replace. It trails out to over 6 miles behind the aircraft in flight.



posted on Dec, 11 2015 @ 10:52 AM
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a reply to: Zaphod58

Is their some sort of quick release / explosive bolts in place to deal with a snag or failure of some kind?



posted on Dec, 11 2015 @ 11:06 AM
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a reply to: Bfirez

There was a disconnect system near the spool. Which was why we had to change a few. Heh.



posted on Dec, 11 2015 @ 12:41 PM
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a reply to: Zaphod58

Any interesting stories as to how they got lost, or all they all boring "the damn thing just broke"?



posted on Dec, 11 2015 @ 12:56 PM
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originally posted by: Zaphod58
a reply to: Sammamishman

We lost a few. They're a serious pain in the ass to replace. It trails out to over 6 miles behind the aircraft in flight.


The problem with having to use such a low frequency and needing an almost comically long aerial.Thank god 'normal' communications on VHF and UHF only need aerials a meter or so long.



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