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Ben Carson is a Creationist

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posted on Nov, 1 2015 @ 06:06 PM
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a reply to: diggindirt




You know, I've never quizzed them on their religious beliefs. I just know that they are good neighbors and good citizens of the community. Their specific beliefs are of little consequence to me.


Then why did you say they are some of the most fundamental Christians if you never quizzed them on their beliefs?
Being good people does not make on a fundamental Christian...
www.alternet.org...

My point is not to paint them all bad like you are making it out to be, far from it. I know it is fun to create that red herring but hardly my objective.

And I bet with those people you work with there are plenty of people from other religions or atheist as well.




posted on Nov, 1 2015 @ 06:09 PM
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originally posted by: Prezbo369

originally posted by: diggindirt
It is the Christians like Mr. Obama---the ones who send drones to indiscriminately kill people that frighten me---not those who believe that immoral people will wind up in hell fire for their misdeeds.


Does this mean you prefer Christians like Mr Bush, that invade other countries and kill hundreds of thousands, even millions of people in a more particular fashion?



No, where would you get such an outlandish idea? As I understand it, Bush started the whole drone program. Why would I prefer him? I was in the streets marching against Bush the First's war.

It was a nice try to redirect the argument but it is futile. The fact is that Christians as a whole aren't out killing/maiming people because of their belief or lack of same. Yes, there are some groups in some areas who are perverting the religion----as has been done in the distant past---but they are few and far between. To compare fundamentalist Christians to ISIS is a show of ignorance and intolerance. To compare free speech, even political free speech, to violence is stretching and twisting so far that I can't imagine how a normal, healthy mind could achieve it.



posted on Nov, 1 2015 @ 06:11 PM
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a reply to: diggindirt




The fact is that Christians as a whole aren't out killing/maiming people because of their belief or lack of same. Yes, there are some groups in some areas who are perverting the religion----as has been done in the distant past---but they are few and far between. To compare fundamentalist Christians to ISIS is a show of ignorance and intolerance.


I don't think you understand what a fundamentalist is...
Fundamentalist is some one who takes the bible to its literal interpretation, as well as distoring what that says, which would very much so be similar to isis.
Fundies are fundies and they are dangerous.
Being a good person and being christian does not make you a fundamentalist...

Also hope you apply the same logic you laid out above to other muslims that have nothing to do with ISIS or other extremist.
edit on stSun, 01 Nov 2015 18:12:37 -0600America/Chicago1120153780 by Sremmos80 because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 1 2015 @ 07:06 PM
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originally posted by: Sremmos80
a reply to: diggindirt




You know, I've never quizzed them on their religious beliefs. I just know that they are good neighbors and good citizens of the community. Their specific beliefs are of little consequence to me.


Then why did you say they are some of the most fundamental Christians if you never quizzed them on their beliefs?
Being good people does not make on a fundamental Christian...
www.alternet.org...

My point is not to paint them all bad like you are making it out to be, far from it. I know it is fun to create that red herring but hardly my objective.

And I bet with those people you work with there are plenty of people from other religions or atheist as well.


I don't read minds, only the posts that you provide:


Fundamental Christians are not peaceful, sorry to tell you that.


I know these people are fundamentalists because of their lifestyle. I'm sorry you can't understand/accept that. You made an extreme statement:



Fundamental Christians are not peaceful, sorry to tell you that.


and provided a link for a group in Africa that is violent. I asked for a listing of US groups---not individuals who are bat-spit crazy---who are instigating violence/war on others, believers and non-believers. I'm still waiting for that list.

The evidence of the falsity of your statement is the mere fact that as a country we are not overwhelmed by religious violence/death. It was not me that created the red herring, it was your false statement about fundamental Christians.

Of course there are people from other religions and non-believers as well with whom I work on community projects. That's why I said, "mostly Christians" but pointed out that these Christians, (and many, many of them would be classified by you and others as "fundamentalists" because they belong to a particular sect) don't ask about religious affiliation, they just help the needy because they believe that we are all children of God/Creator.

It is said that ignorance breeds fear. I see a lot of irrational fear being expressed in this thread and every other thread in which religion is even mentioned. Perhaps the fearful should examine those fears and find the cause of their ignorance.



posted on Nov, 1 2015 @ 08:49 PM
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a reply to: Sremmos80
Nice try at derailment into Muslim discussion but you've have to take that up in a different thread.

It ain't me that is ignorant of fundamental Christian beliefs. I was raised in a church that is often heading the list of fundamentalist sects. They are listed that way because of their practices---no instrumental music in worship services, no women serving as public leaders, no church hierarchy, belief in a literal heaven and hell, etc.

Being from a religiously-diverse family, I visited literally dozens of different sects of Christianity in my youth. Most would be characterized today as fundamentalist, as in the literal translation of the Bible, a literal heaven/hell and condemnation of those who violate God's rules. The only time I ever felt any fear from people with different beliefs was when I was 5 years-old and went with my Grandmother to a revival. When the sermon was done a lady in the pew in front of us "got the Spirit" (as it was later explained to me) and began dancing about in the aisle and shouting in a strange language that I couldn't understand. I had never witnessed anything like that anywhere. I had, however, heard adults speak of epileptic "fits" and since her behavior seemed out-of-control to me, I assumed that was what was happening and promptly got myself under the pew so as to be out of the way of whoever would be along to help her. It was only when we were on the way home that my Grandmother explained to me about how some churches had different practices than others. That was the first time I'd ever heard of people willingly handling snakes in a religious setting. Yikes!

Here's a bit more of your ignorance:


Fundamentalist is some one who takes the bible to its literal interpretation, as well as distoring what that says, which would very much so be similar to isis.


Fundamentalists Christians do indeed take the Bible as literal, as in The Teachings of Christ. Some include the writing of his disciples as well. Their creeds say they are followers of Christ and members of his Church. The Old Testament is a telling of the history of the Jewish people and the old laws under which they were governed. The New Testament is just that---a radical, new law of governance for mankind. That's why you don't see Christians sacrificing animals to God or stoning whole families of people who break the rules.

So, yes, without quizzing the Amish or Mennonites I can ascertain that they are fundamentalist Christians because their doctrine is reflected in their lifestyle. I also know from my Religious Studies classes that they use the Bible as their single religious text and their communities are structured to adhere to New Testament teaching regarding communal living, and "being in this world but not of this world."

So to me it is irrational and illogical to fear a fundamentalist Christian because they believe in the message of Christ---a non-violent message.

Any individual can twist any writing or speech of any religious leader to their own desires---and do so frequently. Hanging an entire religion on the basis of a few crazy individuals is just plain ignorant and intolerant. That's like blaming me for what those few crazy people in Washington, DC do with the tax money I send them.



posted on Nov, 1 2015 @ 09:29 PM
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Put yourself in this situation:

You are in a room, locked in a cage. On a bench out of reach is the key to your cell, a can of gasoline, and a lighter. There are two men in adjoining rooms. One is a fundamentalist Christian, the other is a member of ISIS.

You have the ability to open one door to one other room. Which man will you allow to have access to the key, the gasoline, and the lighter?



posted on Nov, 1 2015 @ 10:00 PM
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a reply to: Teikiatsu

Probably the ISIS member, they know how to McGyver just about anything; coming from 3rd world countries and whatnot. He'd probably know how to make/use those things in all kinds of creative ways to get us out of there.


edit on 1-11-2015 by MystikMushroom because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 2 2015 @ 10:37 AM
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a reply to: Realtruth

You are seeing what you want to see here. I think Carson is saying it would be a conflict of interest and probably one that does not represent the majority of Americans. This would have been like FDR dying and having a Japanese president replace him during a war with Japan.



posted on Nov, 2 2015 @ 12:36 PM
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originally posted by: diggindirt

So, yes, without quizzing the Amish or Mennonites I can ascertain that they are fundamentalist Christians because their doctrine is reflected in their lifestyle. I also know from my Religious Studies classes that they use the Bible as their single religious text and their communities are structured to adhere to New Testament teaching regarding communal living,


You might be thinking of Hutterites.

You would be hard pressed to find any Mennonites living communally (Amish as well, for that matter.) They are very active in accumulating private property.



posted on Nov, 2 2015 @ 01:20 PM
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a reply to: DelMarvel
There are large communities of both groups living in western Kentucky. Not at all hard to find, just follow the buggies they use instead of motor vehicles. There are also large communities in Missouri near Kansas City.



posted on Nov, 2 2015 @ 01:24 PM
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originally posted by: diggindirt
a reply to: DelMarvel
There are large communities of both groups living in western Kentucky. Not at all hard to find, just follow the buggies they use instead of motor vehicles. There are also large communities in Missouri near Kansas City.


And they don't live communally.



posted on Nov, 2 2015 @ 03:09 PM
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a reply to: DelMarvel

I bow to your omniscient knowledge. Mine is obviously inferior.



posted on Nov, 4 2015 @ 08:05 AM
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I Ben Carson a skull and bones member? He went to Yale. Every president is either a bonesman or a puppet with a bonesman handler.



posted on Nov, 5 2015 @ 12:15 PM
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why s this site s odead? Maybe the great Ben Carson can lay some facts and wake you all up.

www.youtube.com...



posted on Nov, 5 2015 @ 12:23 PM
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originally posted by: Murgatroid

originally posted by: BuzzyWigs
this guy, with his 'meek' tone, is saying that he believes in that ancient, outdated, ridiculous belief.

Really, ATS?

REALLY?

It's beyond absurd.


Darwinism = ancient ✔

Darwinism = outdated ✔

Darwinism = a ridiculous belief ✔

Darwinism = absurd ✔

Really, ATS?

Evolutionism is nothing more than pagan mythology from ancient idol worshiping cultures...

Darwin basically plagiarized Anaximander who taught that humans evolved from fish.


Evolution and its related concepts did not originate from science. The concept of evolution emerged from the imaginations of men. Evolution is based in pagan mythology while later promoted among Greek philosophers like Anaximander and Democritus. Diodorus Siculus, a 1st c. BC historian, presented evolution in his “Universal History”, which was one of the beliefs of the ancient Egyptians. Diodorus recorded that the Egyptians believed that life originated in swamps and marshes eventually resulting in other life forms.

Pagan Origins of Evolution

"Gotta love how 'evolution theory' is historically demonstrated to be nothing but failed ancient mythology updated & repackaged with scientific lingo hijacked from Christian pioneers of science (Linnaeus, Ray, Mendel, Cuvier,etc), pushed by Freemasonic/Communist control of centralized gov't, universities, press, media & think-tanks backed by the satanic elite with their world Socialist revolution while 'Atheists' still cling to politically corrupt 'science' or point to imaginary 'evidence'." Source

"The theory of evolution came from the Hindu Brahmins. Pantheistic evolution was passed down by Pythagoras to the Greeks. Thales and his Ionic School branched out from Pantheistic Evolution to Naturalistic Evolution. Plato and Aristotle's evolutionary ideas were dispersed through the Alexandrian School in Egypt.

The ideas were followed through the Middle Ages (Aquinas), Renaissance and into Freemasonry, where they were preserved. Freemasonry and the Enlightenment had a re-birth of the philosophy of evolution. Lord Monboddo and Erasmus Darwin carried the philosophy forward. Charles Darwin, coaxed by Charles Lyell, developed the idea."

www.youtube.com...



wow I had no idea



posted on Nov, 5 2015 @ 12:32 PM
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Going along with his creationist viewpoint, it came out recently that Carson thinks Joseph built the Great Pyramids of Giza to store grain. Now this may have been 17 years ago, and I question timing of this story now...but seriously? Grain storage?


“My own personal theory is that Joseph built the pyramids to store grain,” Carson – who last week overtook Republican rival Donald Trump for the first time in a national poll – told graduates in his address.

“Now all the archeologists think that they were made for the pharaohs’ graves. But, you know, it would have to be something awfully big if you stop and think about it.

“And I don’t think it’d just disappear over the course of time to store that much grain.”

Asked on Wednesday if he still held these views, Carson told CBS News: “It’s still my belief, yes.”

The Guardian
(video at source)

The fact that when questioned he didn't say something like, "Well that was a long time ago..." or "It was just a theory.." or maybe a "No, I don't think that anymore" -- instead, he confirmed that he still believes the pyramids were created by Joseph to store grain. Let's not forget there is very little historical evidence that the Jewish people were slaves and built the pyramids in the first place.



posted on Nov, 5 2015 @ 12:36 PM
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originally posted by: NihilistSanta
a reply to: introvert

I agree several presidents and their wives believed in the supernatural . Things like ghost which have no scientific basis or proof. Hillary Clinton has said numerous things about the spirit of Eleanor Roosevelt in the White House.



Nancy Reagan and Lincoln



posted on Nov, 5 2015 @ 12:41 PM
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originally posted by: MystikMushroom
Going along with his creationist viewpoint, it came out recently that Carson thinks Joseph built the Great Pyramids of Giza to store grain. Now this may have been 17 years ago, and I question timing of this story now...but seriously? Grain storage?


“My own personal theory is that Joseph built the pyramids to store grain,” Carson – who last week overtook Republican rival Donald Trump for the first time in a national poll – told graduates in his address.

“Now all the archeologists think that they were made for the pharaohs’ graves. But, you know, it would have to be something awfully big if you stop and think about it.

“And I don’t think it’d just disappear over the course of time to store that much grain.”

Asked on Wednesday if he still held these views, Carson told CBS News: “It’s still my belief, yes.”

The Guardian
(video at source)

The fact that when questioned he didn't say something like, "Well that was a long time ago..." or "It was just a theory.." or maybe a "No, I don't think that anymore" -- instead, he confirmed that he still believes the pyramids were created by Joseph to store grain. Let's not forget there is very little historical evidence that the Jewish people were slaves and built the pyramids in the first place.
yes he should be given credit for not denying, not backtracking, sticking to his beliefs. Hey what if a guy believed aliens made the pyramids, does that mean I wouldn't vote for him no, I kind of believe that myself already! Hillary would just lie and say she never said that, even with the video proof.

It's just odd that, you know, no grain was found there, but plenty of mummies were, in the pyramids.



posted on Nov, 5 2015 @ 12:42 PM
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a reply to: masqua

And Obama carried all those good luck charms in his pocket, so if we nit pick about every quirky belief, someone in offices has, might as well have a King.

some of the pagans posting here wouldn't mind a pagan president.



posted on Nov, 5 2015 @ 12:49 PM
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originally posted by: Stormdancer777
a reply to: masqua

And Obama carried all those good luck charms in his pocket, so if we nit pick about every quirky belief, someone in offices has, might as well have a King.

some of the pagans posting here wouldn't mind a pagan president.

elves it'd make sense they'd support a pagan president no? wouldn't mind at least?



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