It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

What is marriage for?

page: 2
7
<< 1   >>

log in

join
share:

posted on Jul, 7 2015 @ 11:04 AM
link   
Check out MGTOW on youtube, men are walking away from marriage because it is harmful to men and children.




posted on Jul, 7 2015 @ 02:46 PM
link   
Let's see if these Questions (What was marriage set up for ? What is the purpose of marriage? Why was it established? And who established marriage in the first place? What is marriage for? ) can be answered in one of the oldest historical documents we have the Holy Bible. (I recognize that a mere man would not have preserved these verses in the Bible because it goes against his desires and flesh.)

One Person in the Above thread mentioned the Bible but then gave no reference to any Bible verses, possibly because he was beings sarcastic. Clearly the Bible does have a lot to say about marriage.

Reading what Jesus says it would seem that God was the author of marriage and according to the following scripture the joining or word cleave made them one flesh.

Mr 10:2 And the Pharisees came to him, and asked him, Is it lawful for a man to put away his wife? tempting him.
3 And he answered and said unto them, What did Moses command you?
4 And they said, Moses suffered to write a bill of divorcement, and to put her away.
5 And Jesus answered and said unto them, For the hardness of your heart he wrote you this precept.
6 But from the beginning of the creation God made them male and female.
7 For this cause shall a man leave his father and mother, and cleave to his wife;
8 And they twain shall be one flesh: so then they are no more twain, but one flesh.
9 What therefore God hath joined together, let not man put asunder.
10 And in the house his disciples asked him again of the same matter.
11 And he saith unto them, Whosoever shall put away his wife, and marry another, committeth adultery against her.
12 And if a woman shall put away her husband, and be married to another, she committeth adultery.

What Paul reveals is that the institution of marriage may have been for even a moral reason. the institution of marriage may as indicated in the verses below have been to help men not to sin in the area of Fornication, or Adultery. Also clear by these verses that marriage was between one man and one woman. (see underlined verses)

1Cor 7:1 ¶ Now concerning the things whereof ye wrote unto me: It is good for a man not to touch a woman.
2 Nevertheless, to avoid fornication, let every man have his own wife, and let every woman have her own husband.
3 Let the husband render unto the wife due benevolence: and likewise also the wife unto the husband.
4 The wife hath not power of her own body, but the husband: and likewise also the husband hath not power of his own body, but the wife.
5 Defraud ye not one the other, except it be with consent for a time, that ye may give yourselves to fasting and prayer; and come together again, that Satan tempt you not for your incontinency.
6 But I speak this by permission, and not of commandment.
7 For I would that all men were even as I myself. But every man hath his proper gift of God, one after this manner, and another after that.
8 I say therefore to the unmarried and widows, It is good for them if they abide even as I.
9 But if they cannot contain, let them marry: for it is better to marry than to burn.

So it looks as if God was the one who started marriage. He gave it to help man not to sin the sin of fornication and the sin of adultery (1Cor 7:5). And by the context of the Bible we see marriage is between one man and one woman.

Are the other books that predate or about the same time of the Inspiration of the Bible text that speak of Marriage.

Do the Veda's have reference to marriage?

Does the Egyptian book of the Dead have reference to it?

Does the Hammurabi's Code of Laws have reference to marriage?

Please let's keep digging for the answers



posted on Jul, 7 2015 @ 02:58 PM
link   
Here is what Hammurabi Code of Law's says.

It would also seem under the Hammurabi Code of Laws that marriage was between a man and a woman. we can see this in the fact that no marriage between same sex was mentioned and wife is always presented as a her which is a female of the species.

128. If a man has taken a wife and has not executed a marriage contract, that woman is not a wife.

129. If a man's wife be caught lying with another, they shall be strangled and cast into the water. If the wife's husband would save his wife, the king can save his servant.

130. If a man has ravished another's betrothed wife, who is a virgin, while still living in her father's house, and has been caught in the act, that man shall be put to death; the woman shall go free.

131. If a man's wife has been accused by her husband, and has not been caught lying with another, she shall swear her innocence, and return to her house.

132. If a man's wife has the finger pointed at her on account of another, but has not been caught lying with him, for her husband's sake she shall plunge into the sacred river.

133. If a man has been taken captive, and there was maintenance in his house, but his wife has left her house and entered another man's house; because that woman has not preserved her body, and has entered into the house of another, that woman shall be prosecuted and shall be drowned.

134. If a man has been taken captive, but there was not maintenance in his house, and his wife has entered into the house of another, that woman has no blame.

135. If a man has been taken captive, but there was no maintenance in his house for his wife, and she has entered into the house of another, and has borne him children, if in the future her [first] husband shall return and regain his city, that woman shall return to her first husband, but the children shall follow their own father.

136. If a man has left his city and fled, and, after he has gone, his wife has entered into the house of another; if the man return and seize his wife, the wife of the fugitive shall not return to her husband, because he hated his city and fled.

137. If a man has determined to divorce a concubine who has borne him children, or a votary who has granted him children, he shall return to that woman her marriage-portion, and shall give her the usufruct of field, garden, and goods, to bring up her children. After her children have grown up, out of whatever is given to her children, they shall give her one son's share, and the husband of her choice shall marry her.

138. If a man has divorced his wife, who has not borne him children, he shall pay over to her as much money as was given for her bride-price and the marriage-portion which she brought from her father's house, and so shall divorce her.

139. If there was no bride-price, he shall give her one mina of silver, as a price of divorce.

140. If he be a plebeian, he shall give her one-third of a mina of silver.

141. If a man's wife, living in her husband's house, has persisted in going out, has acted the fool, has wasted her house, has belittled her husband, he shall prosecute her. If her husband has said, "I divorce her," she shall go her way; he shall give her nothing as her price of divorce. If her husband has said, "I will not divorce her," he may take another woman to wife; the wife shall live as a slave in her husband's house.

142. If a woman has hated her husband and has said, "You shall not possess me," her past shall be inquired into, as to what she lacks. If she has been discreet, and has no vice, and her husband has gone out, and has greatly belittled her, that woman has no blame, she shall take her marriage-portion and go off to her father's house.

143. If she has not been discreet, has gone out, ruined her house, belittled her husband, she shall be drowned.

144. If a man has married a votary, and that votary has given a maid to her husband, and so caused him to have children, and, if that man is inclined to marry a concubine, that man shall not be allowed to do so, he shall not marry a concubine.

145. If a man has married a votary, and she has not granted him children, and he is determined to marry a concubine, that man shall marry the concubine, and bring her into his house, but the concubine shall not place herself on an equality with the votary.

146. If a man has married a votary, and she has given a maid to her husband, and the maid has borne children, and if afterward that maid has placed herself on an equality with her mistress, because she has borne children, her mistress shall not sell her, she shall place a slave-mark upon her, and reckon her with the slave-girls.

147. If she has not borne children, her mistress shall sell her.

148. If a man has married a wife and a disease has seized her, if he is determined to marry a second wife, he shall marry her. He shall not divorce the wife whom the disease has seized. In the home they made together she shall dwell, and he shall maintain her as long as she lives.

149. If that woman was not pleased to stay in her husband's house, he shall pay over to her the marriage-portion which she brought from her father's house, and she shall go away.

150. If a man has presented field, garden, house, or goods to his wife, has granted her a deed of gift, her children, after her husband's death, shall not dispute her right; the mother shall leave it after her death to that one of her children whom she loves best. She shall not leave it to her kindred.

151. If a woman, who is living in a man's house, has persuaded her husband to bind himself, and grant her a deed to the effect that she shall not be held for debt by a creditor of her husband's; if that man had a debt upon him before he married that woman, his creditor shall not take his wife for it. Also, if that woman had a debt upon her before she entered that man's house, her creditor shall not take her husband for it.

152. From the time that the woman entered into the man's house they together shall be liable for all debts subsequently incurred.

153. If a man's wife, for the sake of another, has caused her husband to be killed, that woman shall be impaled.

154. If a man has committed incest with his daughter, that man shall be banished from the city.

155. If a man has betrothed a maiden to his son and his son has known her, and afterward the man has lain in her bosom, and been caught, that man shall be strangled and she shall be cast into the water.

156. If a man has betrothed a maiden to his son, and his son has not known her, and that man has lain in her bosom, he shall pay her half a mina of silver, and shall pay over to her whatever she brought from her father's house, and the husband of her choice shall marry her.

157. If a man, after his father's death, has lain in the bosom of his mother, they shall both of them be burnt together.

158. If a man, after his father's death, be caught in the bosom of his step-mother, who has borne children, that man shall be cut off from his father's house.

159. If a man, who has presented a gift to the house of his prospective father-in-law and has given the bride-price, has afterward looked upon another woman and has said to his father-in-law, "I will not marry your daughter"; the father of the girl shall keep whatever he has brought as a present.



edit on 7-7-2015 by ChesterJohn because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 7 2015 @ 03:03 PM
link   
a reply to: ChesterJohn

Yes. Yes. Yes. And yes.

All religions are rife with reference to symbolism related to feminine, masculine, marriage, trinity (mother/father/son).

I suspect that if we had recorded history from 10k years ago, you would find the same. It is the core of paganism (well, partially anyway).



posted on Jul, 7 2015 @ 03:14 PM
link   
a reply to: bigfatfurrytexan

Hammurabi Code of Laws is not religious it is civil.

The Bible has religious intervals but also are historical as well.

We cannot rule out the religious just because we are anti religion.

BTW, The oldest historical documents we have only go back 3 to 4 thousand years.



posted on Jul, 8 2015 @ 05:21 AM
link   

originally posted by: bigfatfurrytexan
a reply to: ChesterJohn

All religions are rife with reference to symbolism related to feminine, masculine, marriage, trinity (mother/father/son).


I have already shown Christianity and its mentions of marriage can you support your statement with other religious documents from Hinduism or Buddhism? Animism.

Some of the Hammurabi Laws have been taken, if not plagerized, by Mohammed and others and put in the Quran and the Haddiths to underscore Sharia law.

The code of law's setup by Hammurabi were roughly 500 to 600 years before the Law of Moses. Hammurabi was also known as the Chedorlaomer king of Elam, one of the five kings destroyed by Abram. That is why Hammurabi just seems to disappear from the pages of history.



new topics

top topics
 
7
<< 1   >>

log in

join