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US sends aircraft and supplies to Nepal

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posted on May, 5 2015 @ 04:27 PM
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Four MV-22 Osprey, from Marine Medium Tiltrotor Squadron 262, based in Okinawa Japan have flown from Okinawa to Nepal, escorted by two KC-130s. At the same time, C-17 aircraft from Alaska and other locations have begun flying in three UH-1Y Huey helicopters. More C-17s are on standby if needed. A current total of 150 troops are reported as being involved, but that number can and probably will change as the operation is expanded. The V-22s and UH-1s will fly search and rescue, as well as move supplies around the area as needed.


The U.S. is sending more aircraft to Nepal to fly relief supplies from Kathmandu to refugees in need, defense officials said on Saturday.

The Marine Corps is sending four MV-22 Ospreys and two KC-130 cargo aircraft to Nepal, said Maj. Christopher Logan, a spokesman for Marine Forces, Pacific. Three UH-1Y Huey helicopters are being flown to Nepal in Air Force C-17s, he said.

The Ospreys are from Marine Medium Tiltrotor Squadron 262
based out of Marine Corps Air Station Futenma in Okinawa, Japan, according to Marine Forces, Pacific. The UH-1Ys are from Marine Light Attack Helicopter Squadron 469. They are now at Futenma but their home station is Marine Corps Air Station Miramar, California. The two KC-130s are with Marine Aerial Refueler Transport Squadron 152 based out of Marine Corps Air Station Iwakuni, Japan.

www.airforcetimes.com...




posted on May, 5 2015 @ 04:56 PM
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No offense Zaph, but what exactly is the topic of conversation for this thread?

Is that deployment somehow unusual or meaningful beyond the simple fact that we are helping some people in Nepal?

One could argue that given the intense interest in the Shambhala legend by countries/regimes such as the Nazi's and China that the US could be using this oppurtunity to explore some areas that were previously hidden. Would this deployment favor that scenario?



posted on May, 5 2015 @ 04:59 PM
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a reply to: Zaphod58

Thats some heavy stuff.

Wouldnt have pegged them to use ospreys



posted on May, 5 2015 @ 04:59 PM
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a reply to: Thorneblood

Just an update to the situation in Nepal for anyone that is interested and doesn't follow military deployments.



posted on May, 5 2015 @ 05:01 PM
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a reply to: crazyewok

I was surprised to see them sent by air. I would have figured they would have folded them and shipped them, not flown them. That's a long flight considering they had to avoid China and Vietnam airspace. It's almost 12 hours by air in a straight line.



posted on May, 5 2015 @ 05:03 PM
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I personally as an American tax payer don't like having to pay for someone else's relief, with my income. Especially for something we didn't cause. I understand dropping food. But fuel man hours and soldier away from posts I do not appreciate with our money being the forefront of the budget.



posted on May, 5 2015 @ 05:04 PM
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originally posted by: Zaphod58
a reply to: crazyewok

I was surprised to see them sent by air. I would have figured they would have folded them and shipped them, not flown them. That's a long flight considering they had to avoid China and Vietnam airspace. It's almost 12 hours by air in a straight line.


Maybe its a test of there versatility.

See how much you can push them. Nepal will be a good place to test them to the limit.



posted on May, 5 2015 @ 05:05 PM
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a reply to: Thorneblood


to fly relief supplies from Kathmandu to refugees in need



posted on May, 5 2015 @ 05:06 PM
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a reply to: crazyewok

Yeah, it will be a good way to get more info on sortie rate, maintenance issues at high altitude, etc. They have some of that from Afghanistan, but the more you can get the better it will be later.



posted on May, 5 2015 @ 05:10 PM
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originally posted by: 5thNovember
I personally as an American tax payer don't like having to pay for someone else's relief, with my income. Especially for something we didn't cause. I understand dropping food. But fuel man hours and soldier away from posts I do not appreciate with our money being the forefront of the budget.


Actually its a very good use.

It gives your armed forces real live experiance without putting them in real risk.

Those marines and piliots will get some real good experiance operating in mountin , cold weather and bad logistical areas.

Thats means if something kicked off to the USA dettrement later on and you had to do something less pleasent you have a very well trained force that can deal with all enviroments.

As mentioned above it also gives you a chance to test equipment and trouble shoot. Better a problem arise in a situation likr this than risk a equipment issue under fire.

If you leave your troops to sit around twiddling there thumbs in base they will lose effectiveness and risk being stuck with crap equipment.
USA learned that mistake at the start of WW2.
edit on 5-5-2015 by crazyewok because: (no reason given)

edit on 5-5-2015 by crazyewok because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 6 2015 @ 08:17 AM
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originally posted by: Zaphod58
a reply to: crazyewok

I was surprised to see them sent by air. I would have figured they would have folded them and shipped them, not flown them. That's a long flight considering they had to avoid China and Vietnam airspace. It's almost 12 hours by air in a straight line.


Given that Nepal is land locked the amount of time and risk in shipping them would have been prohibitive. I will be very interested to see how they deliver supplies to remote areas that lack the runways fixed wing aircraft require.

It is also good to see the US military still being able to undertake the role of disaster relief in an era of austerity. Unlike the geopolitical forces that brought the search for Flight MH370 to the Southern Ocean this is a genuine humanitarian mission. By showing the MV-22 Osprey can be used for disaster relief , military leaders will be able to argue for future funding for the program.



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