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AI interns: Software already taking jobs from humans

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posted on Apr, 3 2015 @ 10:11 PM
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Source: www.newscientist.com...

Snippet:

FORGET Skynet. Hypothetical world-ending artificial intelligence makes headlines, but the hype ignores what's happening right under our noses. Cheap, fast AI is already taking our jobs, we just haven't noticed. This isn't dumb automation that can rapidly repeat identical tasks. It's software that can learn about and adapt to its environment, allowing it to do work that used to be the exclusive domain of humans, from customer services to answering legal queries. These systems don't threaten to enslave humanity, but they do pose a challenge: if software that does the work of humans exists, what work will we do?


You have to take a few minutes and actually read and grasp this article in New Scientist. This directly effects and impacts so many people I may well end up building cooperatives for displaced technology workers since these people are in the last year or so of their working lives and there is no way out for them. Many have not even paid off their student loans. The global economy is turning into a place where the need for human capital is simply not required for many until now good paying technical sectors. We have to turn into a creative economy not an industrial economy in order to remain relevant I think.




posted on Apr, 3 2015 @ 10:12 PM
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originally posted by: machineintelligence
Source: www.newscientist.com...

Snippet:

FORGET Skynet. Hypothetical world-ending artificial intelligence makes headlines, but the hype ignores what's happening right under our noses. Cheap, fast AI is already taking our jobs, we just haven't noticed. This isn't dumb automation that can rapidly repeat identical tasks. It's software that can learn about and adapt to its environment, allowing it to do work that used to be the exclusive domain of humans, from customer services to answering legal queries. These systems don't threaten to enslave humanity, but they do pose a challenge: if software that does the work of humans exists, what work will we do?


You have to take a few minutes and actually read and grasp this article in New Scientist. This directly effects and impacts so many people I may well end up building cooperatives for displaced technology workers since these people are in the last year or so of their working lives and there is no way out for them. Many have not even paid off their student loans. The global economy is turning into a place where the need for human capital is simply not required for many until now good paying technical sectors. We have to turn into a creative economy not an industrial economy in order to remain relevant I think.


Simple classification and expert system (decision making) jobs. No big loss really.

AI is not that powerful as people make it out to be, that is only for publicity and grants.

This is my area of expertise.



posted on Apr, 3 2015 @ 10:13 PM
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AI will eventually take over every industry. Who will buy the products produced by those industry, the robots that make the products?



posted on Apr, 3 2015 @ 10:14 PM
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originally posted by: eManym
AI will eventually take over every industry. Who will buy the products produced by those industry, the robots that make the products?


Intelligent systems are not so intelligent

Mostly they are simple classification systems, IF THEN ELSE rules, DECISION TREES.

These are NOT skilled jobs.

The news article is nothing but hyperbole and drama.


edit on 3-4-2015 by bullcat because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 3 2015 @ 10:20 PM
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Currently the technology is in its infant stage. I have done some work in the past with neural networks and I am familiar with rule based AI. Neural networks are a long way off from actual effective application. Nowadays they do exhibit learning and mimic the neurons of the brain. Designing a neural network to mimic the brain will require a great deal of space to occupy and have large power requirements. Eventually it will be miniaturized like every other electronic technology. A typical hardware neuron requires a few logic gates with a 2k memory cache.

Maybe in a hundred years.
edit on 3-4-2015 by eManym because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 3 2015 @ 10:21 PM
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originally posted by: eManym
Currently the technology is in its infant stage. I have done some work in the past with neural networks and I am familiar with rule based AI. Neural networks are a long way off from actual effective application. Nowadays they do exhibit learning and mimic the neurons of the brain. Designing a neural network to mimic the brain will require a great deal of space to occupy and have large power requirements. Eventually it will be miniaturized like every other electronic technology.

Maybe in a hundred years.


Combine ANN's with GA's and multiple layers, not just weights on the perceptions and you are making progress.

But in reality most systems in commerce are classification / association rule based mining.

I call hyperbole and drama.

AI is NOT that advanced, not even computational intelligence, again this is my area of speciality.


edit on 3-4-2015 by bullcat because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 3 2015 @ 10:30 PM
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a reply to: eManym

I am not sure where you get your sense of time scale for the advance of AI but a hundred years is not considered by any of the people in that industry as being required for the singularity to occur. More pressing than that is job losses in the next few years to 1 decade out.

People will increasingly be required to train their AI replacements. Those jobs are not ever coming back and the jobs lost will increasingly be more high level ones as that is where the pressure is to cut costs from big company budgets. The consumer model is on it's death bed I think it is clear.



posted on Apr, 3 2015 @ 10:39 PM
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It's been happening for years especially in the assembly line for automakers. With the advent of 3D printers whole industries could be replaced in 15 years such as clothing manufacturing for one.



posted on Apr, 3 2015 @ 10:42 PM
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originally posted by: BoxFulder
It's been happening for years especially in the assembly line for automakers. With the advent of 3D printers whole industries could be replaced in 15 years such as clothing manufacturing for one.


Adapt?

Progress?

Anything repetitive can be automated to precision.

If I wanted a hand crafted car, I will buy a Bentley or Aston Martin, the reason I don't have one of those is cost.

Would be nice to have one, why do you not work there?

I would love to pay for a hand crafted car.

If you expect to stay in a mass produced market as a manual worker, expect to compete with automation.



If you have the skill you claim to have, then produce the product that I would love to buy.

Face it, you are NOT making Spitfires, or Aston Martins, you are lucky to make Kia's (which are pretty good deals actually)

edit on 3-4-2015 by bullcat because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 3 2015 @ 11:03 PM
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a reply to: bullcat

One day all jobs will be replaced by AI including white color jobs. Imagine lawyerbot 4.0 able to instantly cite any and all legal precedent? Even Matlock won't be able to compete.
edit on 3-4-2015 by BoxFulder because: Spelling errors



posted on Apr, 3 2015 @ 11:04 PM
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originally posted by: BoxFulder
a reply to: bullcat

One day all jobs will be replaced by AI including white color jobs. Imagine lawyerbot 4.0 able to instantly cite any and All legal precedent? Even Mattock won't be able to compete.


And that is a bad thing how?


I think humanity would be better off pursuing creativity and philosophical things.



posted on Apr, 3 2015 @ 11:09 PM
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a reply to: bullcat
The obvious problem would be no jobs for people to feed their families. How would the economy operate if there was only production and no consumers?



posted on Apr, 3 2015 @ 11:11 PM
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originally posted by: BoxFulder
a reply to: bullcat
The obvious problem would be no jobs for people to feed their families. How would the economy operate if there was only production and no consumers?


Well I am a huge believer in a Utopian Socialist society if you really want to get down to it.

Money has no place in a civilised society.

But since we are dealing with money and such abstract means of control, then well, I do think people should be creative rather than repetitive.



Let's face it, the jobs this technology is replacing is repetitive, not creative.


edit on 3-4-2015 by bullcat because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 3 2015 @ 11:13 PM
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An AI intern,where do you put the cigar?



posted on Apr, 3 2015 @ 11:19 PM
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a reply to: bullcat
your idea could theoretically work except society would get real ugly before then with every industry phasing human labor out in favor of AI. It wouldn't matter if it happened gradually or overnight the effect would be the same mass unemployment and revolt.



posted on Apr, 3 2015 @ 11:20 PM
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originally posted by: BoxFulder
a reply to: bullcat
your idea could theoretically work except society would get real ugly before then with every industry phasing human labor out in favor of AI. It wouldn't matter if it happened gradually or overnight the effect would be the same mass unemployment and revolt.




Fine by me, let it get ugly and nice after people realise the ugliness.



posted on Apr, 4 2015 @ 06:22 AM
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a reply to: bullcat



This is my area of expertise.


Are you able to provide any links to this expertise?

How is a neurotransmitter really that much different from a transistor? There are more states that can be expressed through all the different chemical neurotransmitters available, but at the end it is still just a switch like a transistor is.



posted on Apr, 4 2015 @ 07:10 AM
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originally posted by: bullcat

originally posted by: eManym
I call hyperbole and drama.

AI is NOT that advanced, not even computational intelligence, again this is my area of speciality.



But the article has a point, more jobs are lost to software and robots. In 10 years from now cars can be selfdriving which means an end to all cabs, parcel and public transportation, trucks, even boats and airplanes. And self learning robots like Baxter will become more advanced and popular in large industries just like robots in agriculture and farming. Education is also getting an overhaul with more online teaching courses, one teacher can reach a large audience.

I'm betting society will be even more contrasted by rich and poor. The rich will have the robot products and latest tech while everyone else will go on living the old fashioned manual way.
edit on 4-4-2015 by johnnyjoe1979 because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 4 2015 @ 12:06 PM
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a reply to: machineintelligence

Have you ever considered this may be a coldly calculated move by the leaders of this country to offload the 'drudge work' and menial labor to blossoming intelligences and to free up human minds to 'play' - explore, create, and more.

Seems like a no brainer "hidden agenda' to me. Not exactly nefarious if you ask me. Simply makes sense.



posted on Apr, 4 2015 @ 08:16 PM
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a reply to: universalbri

I don't think I would call it nefarious as much as inevitable. I certainly do not believe for a second there is a concerted effort by the source controllers the .01% that regularly downsize their populations with war, famine, pestilence and death to replace us with robots. They have only our happiness on their minds.




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