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Help buying a new propane grill

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posted on Mar, 14 2015 @ 01:30 AM
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I really want to get a grill for the new place, but have no idea what I'm actually looking for.

I plan on using the thing a few times a week, and on occasion cooking for around 10 people (burgers and hot dogs). The majority of the time I'll just be cooking for two.

I want something that's large enough to handle having the family over, but I don't want to overdo it and buy some behemoth I never utilize.

I want something quality that is going to last at least 10 years, cleans easily, has parts readily available, can be left out (with a cover and under the eaves) in the Seattle area without rusting, heats evenly and doesn't feel/look like a piece of crap.

I'm looking at a Weber Spirit E-310 Link because it seems to be quality. I am a little bit surprised by the $520 sticker price, but I'll gladly pay it if it's quality. Is that enough to meet the upper end of my grilling requirements? Could I realistically cook for 10 + people?

I really don't want to go much over $500. I also don't want to buy something that's only going to last a few years. If I'm way off, I can go up with the price range, but I really don't want to. I don't care about side burners and other frills, I want something rock solid that does a great job. Also, no weird colors.

Appreciate any help! I am not going to be converted to charcoal, I love them and have fond memories, but I'm not looking for one.




posted on Mar, 14 2015 @ 02:07 AM
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a reply to: Domo1

I've mostly bought cheap grills because I've never seen a grill last very well when exposed to the elements.

It seems one of the reviewers at the linked site mentioned rust after 45 days. Enameled stuff has always gotten rusty in my experience because it's outside and just gets banged up. If you're going to drop 5 bills on a grill I'd look for stainless.



posted on Mar, 14 2015 @ 02:17 AM
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I have had good luck with this model and its only $350 at bLowes
Good even heat and ss is not a foil thin façade.
ss grill


edit on 3 by Mandroid7 because: addidition



posted on Mar, 14 2015 @ 02:20 AM
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a reply to: Domo1

Weber Perofrmer 22" grill. The best part of this grill is it cooks with charcoal but uses gas to light the charcoal so one never needs to use lighter fluid. I have had this grill for 10 years and am on my second kettle (free from Weber). I guarantee you'll love it nad it provides charcoal flavored food without lighter fluid scent or taste. Happy grilling! Regards, J



posted on Mar, 14 2015 @ 02:29 AM
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a reply to: Domo1

Check out the Broil King Signet. Very solid. You can tell a good gas grill by giving it a shake, and by lifting the lid. If it feels nice and solid, it is a good bet it is a quality grill. I bought the Signet, and love it!



posted on Mar, 14 2015 @ 04:13 AM
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Gas=eww Charcoal= YUM!

ID



posted on Mar, 14 2015 @ 04:40 AM
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a reply to: Domo1

Getting lava rocks to line the bottom of the grill (above the burners) is a great way to distribute the heat better and as more meals are grilled more flavor is imparted into them. Seasoning them so to speak.

Also make sure that you can buy additional replacement parts instead of trashing a perfectly good grill that just needs new burners as it ages. I've had a grill that has lasted decades. And it has sat buried in the snow, and exposed to the elements.



posted on Mar, 14 2015 @ 05:57 AM
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My experience has been that most grills will last as long as you want to keep replacing the burners and until the wheels break. My parents have that stainless charbroil grill posted above. It's at least ten years old. My uncle gas one too. Both have replaced the burners multiple times. It has really heavy cast burners with some kind of gold coating. They just don't last more than 5 years with regular use. However, they came with a lifetime warranty, so replacing them was just the hassle of changing the parts, but free of charge- that's not too bad. The valves are going bad on the one my parents own, they might be the second set- not sure. I've had cheaper cast aluminum grills that used the cheap stamped steel burners. They would last several years before the burner needed replaced. Most were like $20-30 and easy to change out. They were ugly and just looked cheap, but functioned just fine. The plastic wheels never seemed to last though. My inlaws currently own a Weber that was in the $500-700 range. It's not that impressive. It's built like a tank, but it puts mediocre heat and replacement parts are outrageously expensive. I wouldn't get too caught up on price because more expensive doesn't always mean better quality or performance. Sometimes cheap to buy means cheap to fix and fewer bells and whistles to break in the first place.



posted on Mar, 14 2015 @ 07:21 AM
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the green egg. why buy something that produces an inferior product. the green egg is the be all/end all grill, smoker, and pizza oven



posted on Mar, 14 2015 @ 08:32 AM
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a reply to: Mandroid7

I had a similar model Charbroil to the one you pic'd and it worked great. Never any complaints. However for flavor I would suggest the Weber that cooks with charcoal. Ultimately flavor is the key. A good friend uses a natural gas and it produces a great taste...better than propane.



posted on Mar, 14 2015 @ 09:45 AM
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DUCANE 5 burner .. had mine 7 years now and being all SS, I have had to replace the burners one time. I cover it after every use.
Cost $1000.00 + depending on model but well worth it.



posted on Mar, 14 2015 @ 09:55 AM
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You're probably not going to go with this, but ...

Hire a mason and brick one in. It'll last forever. It'll be durn near maintenance free. Nobody'll steal it.



posted on Mar, 14 2015 @ 03:01 PM
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a reply to: Domo1

Weber 4-burner grill. It's the hands-down best bang for your buck.

Solid tank-like construction all over, but also in the most important part, drip-collection and drip-pan. Cheap home superstore grills really skimp in this area, and while the rest of the grill could look pretty good, the inner-parts typically only last a couple years. Weber grills are known to last 20+ years, and still be in great shape.

Also, get the ceramic bricks and put them in rows between the flair-up thingies. These can get really hot, and once your grill is up to heat, you can turn the burners way down and cook from the heat of the little bricks. That way you don't risk getting any propane taste in your foods.

I've gotten mine up to 650 degrees for cooking salmon fillets skin-down.


They're more pricey, but worth it.



posted on Mar, 14 2015 @ 06:02 PM
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a reply to: Domo1

Have a look at these..

www.weber.com...

The design is fantastic..grilling and convection at the same time



posted on Mar, 14 2015 @ 10:11 PM
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a reply to: SkepticOverlord

I just picked up the 3 burner. After actually looking at them in person I figured it was the perfect size.

Man you were right about the drip pan and removable drip tray. It's going to be way easier to keep the thing clean. My old grill had neither and it was a pain in the ass, so much so that I think it may have only been cleaned once.

Do the ceramic bricks just rest on the bottom under the "flavorizer" bars that cover the burners?

Looking forward to setting it all up tomorrow and doing some grilling! It's probably been 8 years since I've had one.

Figure this way my girlfriend and I will share the cooking load a bit more equitably.



posted on Mar, 15 2015 @ 06:29 PM
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a reply to: Domo1

I'm not a fan of ceramic bricks, or those so called "flavorizer" bars. Lava rocks will do the trick every time when it comes to propane. And they're cheaper as well.



posted on Mar, 17 2015 @ 11:00 PM
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a reply to: TDawgRex

I'll give 'em a shot! Thanks!



posted on Mar, 17 2015 @ 11:14 PM
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So I got my baby assembled and cooked on her Sunday. It was pouring, and I mean pouring rain, but I made some awesome burgers. Used her again Monday, and made some amazing chicken and asparagus. Used it later that night and whipped up some hotdogs (I think it was 2 AM). Grilled up some vegetables to go with the girlfriends wonderful spaghetti tonight, they turned out perfect!

I think my girlfriend is right, I like cooking if there's fire. I think this is the start of a new hobby/obsession.

For anyone interested, the grill is awesome. It does what it's supposed to do, seems very well constructed (the guy that put it together was a pro!) and the heat seems very even. I'm glad I went with this one, even though it was a bit more expensive. It was pretty clear while I was assembling the thing (which was incredibly easy, thanks to detailed instructions and numbered parts) that this girl is going to last awhile. We have yet to name her, suggestions are appreciated.



posted on Mar, 18 2015 @ 01:25 AM
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originally posted by: Domo1
Do the ceramic bricks just rest on the bottom under the "flavorizer" bars that cover the burners?

Get the squat pyramid shaped bricks, usually a light gray. They sit, flat-side up, between the rows of "flavor bars."

Once you get the hang of using those, only the most delicate whitefish will pick up a propane taste.


Delicate white fish on a grill did he say? But how?


Now the fun begins, get a good quality cast iron pan. Use that in the grill for lots of things from veggies to anything else. I used to make "salmon fingers" in the pan. Get the grill and pan up to 600 degrees, but Agave Oil in the pan (It can take the heat), and put 1.5 inch wide "fingers" of a salmon fillet skin-side down. The skin crisps almost immediately, and in about 3-4 minutes you'll have most amazing medium/medium-rare salmon that cooked from the juices of its own skin.

Now I'm hungry. Cooking with fire good.


You can also get all kinds of pizza stones for your grill, and do this:





Note to TDawg: I've tried the lava rocks also… for me the heat was too uneven, and they didn't retain heat as long as the ceramic bricks.
edit on 18-3-2015 by SkepticOverlord because: (no reason given)

edit on 18-3-2015 by SkepticOverlord because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 19 2015 @ 06:26 AM
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a reply to: SkepticOverlord

My bud has the pyramid bricks and they do spread the heat evenly, but they don't seem to season, everything burns off. I found with lava rocks, the trick is to double the amount recommended and of course turn them from time to time. It doesn't take long and all the holes allow for seasoning them. I've found that once you have good seasoned rocks (It only takes a few BBQ's), there is no propane aftertaste at all.




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