It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

Say it Forward!!

page: 1
4
<<   2 >>

log in

join
share:

posted on Mar, 6 2015 @ 08:36 PM
link   
Now that I am an adult, making my own way in this life, good and bad decisions, reading the news daily in effort to keep up with politics, the debating of whether global warming is fact or fiction, do UFO's really exist? and everything that is NOT Facebook and Twitter....I pause to reflect on the sayings of my Irish Grandfather. Though he passed when I was in my early teens, he often imparted to me his words of wisdom, which he assured me I would one day come to understand. I am now nearing the age my Grandfather was then, and I DO get most of his quips....most.

The following gems usually came out of left field when he was teaching me a difficult task, such as how to filet a fish without disturbing a single bone, or how to skip a stone across the lake.

I am certain none of these are originally authored by him, but repeated often enough that I find myself "saying them forward."

"Corn doesn't ever grow so tall that it doesn't fall over under its own weight."

"A willow doesn't bend with ease, the stronger the wind...the stronger the tree."

"Always give a stranger the time of day for he may one day be your best friend."

"Have an old, cold, tater and wait."

" There is a reason it is difficult to step on a chicken."

"Keep your powder dry".

And the one that I never understood: " Lord love a duck."


I am interested in the sayings of other's grandparents. Please share!






posted on Mar, 6 2015 @ 08:43 PM
link   
If my great grandfather asked me if something is going to work right, after I worked on it, he would ask "Is this going to work right?"
If I replied " It outta."
He would look me square in the face and say "An otter ain't often got an ass like a beaver."
I have no idea how to interpret that statement.
Very Zen.



posted on Mar, 6 2015 @ 08:43 PM
link   
"If I knew i was going to die tonight, i'd go to bed early" is the best one he told me hehe.



posted on Mar, 6 2015 @ 08:48 PM
link   
Mine always said "You don't know your ass from a hole in the ground"

Whatever the hell that meant...


Peace



posted on Mar, 6 2015 @ 08:50 PM
link   
a reply to: jude11

My father used to say that to me frequently...he was an Army Drill Sgt. I KNOW WHAT THAT MEANS!!




posted on Mar, 6 2015 @ 08:51 PM
link   
a reply to: Autorico

Good one! I will remember that.




posted on Mar, 6 2015 @ 08:52 PM
link   
a reply to: skunkape23

Where was your relative from, Skunk? That IS very deep...




posted on Mar, 6 2015 @ 08:56 PM
link   
"Best to be thought a fool than to open ones mouth and remove all doubt"


What's really odd is I'm a very quiet person, and now everyone I know thinks I'm some kind of genius. It's really because I just don't talk crap I know nothing about. I'm smart by lack of showing 'intelligence'. What a weird world this is.



posted on Mar, 6 2015 @ 08:58 PM
link   
a reply to: Qumulys

"Best to be thought a fool than to open ones mouth and remove all doubt" An oldie but a goodie.



posted on Mar, 6 2015 @ 08:58 PM
link   
I had some relatives in the Arkansas Ozarks. When I say they were "hill-billies," I mean it with absolutely no disrespect.
Clarence was an old man, probably in his 70's. Hell, he could have been a hundred for all I know. I went fishing with him when I was kid and we had a pretty good day.
When we hiked back up to the farm, a couple of good sized fish in tow, he started singing a song, I think he was improvising in a jolly sort of moonshine-induced state. The only verse I remember...
"Dog sh@t a flea
Dog sh!t a minner
Dog sh1t a catfish big enough for dinner."
Jumping and clicking his heels here and there.
I wish I could have recorded it. It was one of the most entertaining songs ever.



posted on Mar, 6 2015 @ 09:02 PM
link   

originally posted by: Ultralight
a reply to: skunkape23

Where was your relative from, Skunk? That IS very deep...


South Texas. Gulf Coast. Swamp-Neck country.



posted on Mar, 6 2015 @ 09:07 PM
link   
a reply to: Qumulys

It is so very true!

Also, "a man who represents himself in court has a fool for a client and a jackazz for a lawyer"...

Thanks for sharing!




posted on Mar, 6 2015 @ 09:08 PM
link   
a reply to: skunkape23

Mine were born and raised in the heart of Oklahoma.




posted on Mar, 6 2015 @ 09:11 PM
link   
a reply to: skunkape23

I laughed out loud reading that! Sounds like something my Uncle Vern would have said and did. Wow, Uncle Vern. Yeah...what a character. I totally understand.

My Uncle Vern made up a song called "The Flea on my Knee"
He also rewrote the lines in the song Skip a Rope to Skip a Jug...goes something like this:

How many winos do you see?
One, two, three and the fourth one makes me.
Skip a jug.
(sung to the tune of Skip a Rope)

TOO FUNNY!!!





posted on Mar, 6 2015 @ 09:40 PM
link   
When someone would talk too much my dad would always say one of two things:

1) Someone who talked a lot= "That guy is windier than a sack of butts"
2) Someone who talked a lot of BS= "he talks just to hear his ass suck wind"

#goodstuff #goodtimes



posted on Mar, 6 2015 @ 10:12 PM
link   
My Grandmother always said you catch more flies with honey than you do vinegar. She also used to say you gotta be tough to be old.



posted on Mar, 6 2015 @ 10:42 PM
link   

originally posted by: Ultralight
Now that I am an adult, making my own way in this life, good and bad decisions, reading the news daily in effort to keep up with politics, the debating of whether global warming is fact or fiction, do UFO's really exist? and everything that is NOT Facebook and Twitter....I pause to reflect on the sayings of my Irish Grandfather. Though he passed when I was in my early teens, he often imparted to me his words of wisdom, which he assured me I would one day come to understand. I am now nearing the age my Grandfather was then, and I DO get most of his quips....most.

The following gems usually came out of left field when he was teaching me a difficult task, such as how to filet a fish without disturbing a single bone, or how to skip a stone across the lake.

I am certain none of these are originally authored by him, but repeated often enough that I find myself "saying them forward."

"Corn doesn't ever grow so tall that it doesn't fall over under its own weight."

"A willow doesn't bend with ease, the stronger the wind...the stronger the tree."

"Always give a stranger the time of day for he may one day be your best friend."

"Have an old, cold, tater and wait."

" There is a reason it is difficult to step on a chicken."

"Keep your powder dry".

And the one that I never understood: " Lord love a duck."


I am interested in the sayings of other's grandparents. Please share!




Words of reason and wisdom.
They should have been more straight forward with passing down the wisdom.

Lord love a duck = WTF



posted on Mar, 7 2015 @ 12:40 AM
link   
a reply to: oldworldbeliever

I guess a duck is a pretty stupid animal, so perhaps when you see a bozo get drunk and park his car in the bathroom through a wall you say "Lord love a duck" in the hope that someone upstairs gives a crap for him?

Either that or the Lord loves that duck brand toilet cleaner stuff to get blotto on?



posted on Mar, 7 2015 @ 01:46 AM
link   
a reply to: Ultralight

"Take an old cold tater and wait" is an old country song by Lil Jimmy Dickens. It was related to the story of a child during the depression who, when company would come for Sunday dinner, would get a cold potato from Mama and be told to make do with that and see if there were any leftovers of real food after company had finished eating.

I always figured Lord love a duck was just another thinly veiled profanity variant, sort of like "son of a biscuit", "Son of a gun", or the ever popular (in my family) "Cotton picker."

I have a ton of those old timey family sayings, they drive my wife crazy because she thinks I talk like I'm an old man most of the time when I use them. Many of them aren't fit for ATS, if you follow my meaning.



posted on Mar, 7 2015 @ 02:08 PM
link   
"Sharp as a pound of wet leather."
Old school way of calling someone a dumb ass.



new topics

top topics



 
4
<<   2 >>

log in

join