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Stars Can't Be Seen from Outer Space

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posted on Feb, 26 2015 @ 11:28 AM
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Apparently, stars can't be seen from outer space:

www.wildheretic.com...

Most compelling evidence in the link above is the guy who sky dived from outer spaced and said everything was so dark. Even Neil Armstrong said that the universe was dark and you could only see the earth and the sun from the moon (he says it in the first minute of this video):



Where do the stars go? Some would say that it is the atmosphere that acts as a lens to allow us to see the stars at ground level, but I dont think this is valid. If this were true, then this would mean that the sun would be more intense at ground level than outside the atmosphere, which it is not. Outside the atmosphere the sun radiates about 1.3kW/m^2, whereas at the earth's surface this power dissipates to about 1 kW/m^2. So, maybe stars, and the universe, are not what we think they are. Any thoughts?

***In terms of some astronauts being able to see the stars, and some not, maybe it is a matter of where you are positioned in relation to the moon?


edit on 26-2-2015 by cooperton because: (no reason given)



+14 more 
posted on Feb, 26 2015 @ 11:37 AM
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a reply to: cooperton

Maybe we are the only planet with the only moon revolving around the only sun in the whole universe...
Now thats a scary thought.



posted on Feb, 26 2015 @ 11:40 AM
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a reply to: cooperton


Outside the atmosphere the sun radiates about 1.3kW/m^2, whereas at the earth's surface this power dissipates to about 1 kW/m^2.


Would that not prove the 'lens' effect of the atmosphere then? And why they would be invisible from space, due to the off set, intense glow of the sun in our immediate vicinity?

I don't know much about these things, just spit ballin'. Have astronauts who were on the moon able to see stars? I think I remember seeing NASA photographs of the moon landings, with stars in them.

~Tenth


+69 more 
posted on Feb, 26 2015 @ 11:40 AM
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a reply to: cooperton

the simplest argument against this idiocy - the sun is a star



posted on Feb, 26 2015 @ 11:42 AM
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a reply to: cooperton

Not having atmosphere in outerspace make the dynamic range of available light very high. That is probably above what the eye and most camera are capable of.


+92 more 
posted on Feb, 26 2015 @ 11:46 AM
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a reply to: cooperton
If the stars can't be seen in space how does the hubble telescope take pictures of stars?


+36 more 
posted on Feb, 26 2015 @ 11:46 AM
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So....what? Every image we've seen from Hubble (which is above the atmosphere), is what? A fabrication?

Same for all the probes we've sent out at that use stars for navigation to get to where they are going?


+1 more 
posted on Feb, 26 2015 @ 11:48 AM
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originally posted by: ignorant_ape
a reply to: cooperton

the simplest argument against this idiocy - the sun is a star

Agreed. I'm not that educated where photography is concerned, but doesn't a strong light source bombarding a white surface cancel out a weak light source?



posted on Feb, 26 2015 @ 11:48 AM
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Strange, then, that so many NASA animations show lots of stars.

Some Moon photos did show stars, but they were depicted as tiny specks.

My sense is that in a shadow, such as behind a boulder, you should be able to see lots of stars on the Moon and in Cis-Lunar space (between Earth and Moon) in a capsule. Those that do space-walks from the shuttle do report seeing stars.



posted on Feb, 26 2015 @ 11:49 AM
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a reply to: cooperton
I don't even pretend to understand this , What about the hubble telescope ? .
i will be keeping my eye on this post to see what others more clued up on these matters have to say .



posted on Feb, 26 2015 @ 11:52 AM
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I've never heard of that before, I only know that when the sun is into view here on earth and in orbit nobody would see stars . But in the dark you definitely would see stars..

You almost would re-open the moon hoax cases after watching the video..

edit on 0b17America/ChicagoThu, 26 Feb 2015 12:00:17 -0600vAmerica/ChicagoThu, 26 Feb 2015 12:00:17 -06001 by 0bserver1 because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 26 2015 @ 11:54 AM
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originally posted by: eriktheawful
So....what? Every image we've seen from Hubble (which is above the atmosphere), is what? A fabrication?

Same for all the probes we've sent out at that use stars for navigation to get to where they are going?



Wanna learn about Hubble and how it gets the images it does? Hubble's site tell you.

How Hubble Works



posted on Feb, 26 2015 @ 11:58 AM
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I knew there was something fishy about hyper drive.
edit on 26-2-2015 by filosophia because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 26 2015 @ 12:01 PM
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A collection of Apollo astronaut quotes about stars:

onebigmonkey.comoj.com...

Check the links at the bottom of that page for Apollo images showing stars and planets.

There's also a quote I heard from one of the early shuttle astronauts how said he had a tape of Crosby Stills & Nash's "Southern Cross", which he listened to while looking at the Southern Cross from orbit.


edit on 26-2-2015 by onebigmonkey because: typo



posted on Feb, 26 2015 @ 12:01 PM
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Maybe Neil was wrong? Here's a photo taken through the windows of the space station. (Again, camera vs eye, but they report 'seeing them'.)

spaceflight.nasa.gov...
edit on 26-2-2015 by Maverick7 because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 26 2015 @ 12:03 PM
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I think Neil just slipped tongue there.. He also looks he has to improvise on that question ...



posted on Feb, 26 2015 @ 12:04 PM
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originally posted by: tothetenthpower
a reply to: cooperton


Outside the atmosphere the sun radiates about 1.3kW/m^2, whereas at the earth's surface this power dissipates to about 1 kW/m^2.


Would that not prove the 'lens' effect of the atmosphere then? And why they would be invisible from space, due to the off set, intense glow of the sun in our immediate vicinity?

~Tenth


very good point. But, Armstrong claimed to have also been on the moon when the sun was not shining on it. So if it was the sun that was impeding the stars visibility, then the stars would become visible when it became "night" on the moon, but Armstrong said it was just dark. I tend to agree with what SecretKnowledge said in the first reply.



posted on Feb, 26 2015 @ 12:07 PM
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originally posted by: onebigmonkey
A collection of Apollo astronaut quotes about stars:

onebigmonkey.comoj.com...



Good find, maybe they were still in the earth's atmosphere when they were saying this? Neil was on the moon when he said there were no stars, so maybe that has something to do with it.



posted on Feb, 26 2015 @ 12:10 PM
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originally posted by: ignorant_ape
a reply to: cooperton

the simplest argument against this idiocy - the sun is a star


Idiocy? yes, those idiots travelling to the moon in their fancy machines! His observation is worth consideration, and if you cant see stars from the moon, maybe stars are something that we dont necessarily understand. This is speculation, but maybe they are somehow embedded into our atmosphere, or something.



posted on Feb, 26 2015 @ 12:11 PM
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a reply to: cooperton


then the stars would become visible when it became "night" on the moon,


They would have had to venture to the far side of the moon for that no? The side we see, is always illuminated by the Sun, there is no "night", which is why the sun actually illuminates the sky at night. Since it's reflecting Sun's light.

I don't believe any of the Apollo missions had astronauts on the dark side of the moon. Something about it being too damn cold or something.

~Tenth




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