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A Tale Of Two Decent Chief Of Police:

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posted on Jan, 5 2015 @ 10:50 PM
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On Friday, a police union president sent a blistering email to Pittsburgh's Chief of Police, writing, among other things, "your actions raise serious concerns" and "enough is enough!" The top cop's transgression? Being photographed with a sign reading "I resolve to challenge racism at work" and "#endwhitesilence."

"The chief is calling us racists," Officer Howard McQuillan told KDKA-TV. "He believes the Pittsburgh Police Department is racist. This has angered a lot of officers."

This weekend, Pittsburgh Police Chief Cameron McLay penned a lengthy response to McQuillan's email, similar to one shared by Nashville's Chief of Police last month. In it, McLay apologized to anyone who was offended while defending the photo and its message, stating, "The reality of U.S. policing is that our enforcement efforts have a disparate impact on communities of color" and "unconscious bias applies to how we deal with the public."
"The sign indicated my willingness to challenge racial problems in the workplace," wrote McLay. "I am so committed. If there are problems in the PBP related to racial injustice, I will take action to fix them."
gawker.com...

Klik for full letter response to critics.
Hero cop in my book.

Police Chief's Perfect Response: Respect Protestors, Keep an Open Mind


When a pro-cop citizen wrote the Nashville Police to express his "frustration and outrage" at the city's peaceful handling of recent Ferguson protests, Chief Steve Anderson reminded the letter-writer of a simple fact: "The police are merely a representative of a government formed by the people for the people—for all people."

The open letter response:

Mr. _____________

While I certainly appreciate your offer to intercede on my behalf with our Mayor, you should know that the Mayor has not issued any order, directive or instruction on the matter with which you take issue. All decisions concerning the police department's reaction to the recent demonstrations have been made within the police department and approved by me. Therefore, any reasons or rationale supporting your proposal as what would be the best approach for all of Nashville, and not just a method of utilizing the police department to enforce a personal agenda, should be directed to me.

In that your thoughts deserve consideration, I will attempt to address some of the issues you have raised:

Has consideration been given as to whether the response of the police department "help or hurt the community."
It is our view that every decision made within the police department should be made with the community in mind. Obviously, there are some matters in which we have no discretion. On matters in which we do have discretion, careful consideration is given as to the best course of action, always with the welfare of the general public in mind.

That has been the consideration on this issue. Certainly, in comparing the outcome here in Nashville with what has occurred in some other cities, the results speak for themselves. I stand on the decisions that have been made.

"These actions are putting the department at disharmony from the majority of the citizens."
While I don't doubt that you sincerely believe that your thoughts represent the majority of citizens, I would ask you to consider the following before you chisel those thoughts in stone.

As imperfect humans, we have a tendency to limit our association with other persons to those persons who are most like us. Unfortunately, there is even more of a human tendency to stay within our comfort zone by further narrowing those associations to those persons who share our thoughts and opinions. By doing this we can avoid giving consideration to thoughts and ideas different than our own. This would make us uncomfortable. By considering only the thoughts and ideas we are in agreement with, we stay in our comfort zone. Our own biases get reinforced and reflected back at us leaving no room for any opinion but our own. By doing this, we often convince ourselves that the majority of the world shares opinion and that anyone with another opinion is, obviously, wrong.

It is only when we go outside that comfort zone, and subject ourselves to the discomfort of considering thoughts we don't agree with, that we can make an informed judgment on any matter. We can still disagree and maintain our opinions, but we can now do so knowing that the issue has been given consideration from all four sides. Or, if we truly give fair consideration to all points of view, we may need to swallow our pride and amend our original thoughts.

And, it is only by giving consideration to the thoughts of all persons, even those that disagree with us, that we can have an understanding as to what constitutes a majority.


Chief of Police

gawker.com...

The type of conversation the Community and Cops need to have, listen more and react less.
Gawker links are two similar but somewhat related stories so klik separately:
edit on 5-1-2015 by Spider879 because: (no reason given)




posted on Jan, 5 2015 @ 11:01 PM
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Wow. We live in a society where cops get called heroes for not being racist goons.

Are we going to start handing out medals for not shooting people?

"Good work, Sarge. You managed not to shoot anyone this year. I guess you'll bonus after all."



posted on Jan, 5 2015 @ 11:25 PM
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edit on 0520150120151 by Domo1 because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 5 2015 @ 11:35 PM
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originally posted by: NthOther
Wow. We live in a society where cops get called heroes for not being racist goons.

Are we going to start handing out medals for not shooting people?

"Good work, Sarge. You managed not to shoot anyone this year. I guess you'll bonus after all."

Hay I'll take it.



posted on Jan, 5 2015 @ 11:52 PM
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a reply to: Spider879

It's imperfect, but who isn't?

IMO.. Law abiding citizens, allying with LEO to make a stand would do good to alleviate the divide which seems to be the flavor of the day in regards to community - police relations...

Their is bad in both the LEO and community, in both it's a minority... too bad that the majority of good LEOs and community fail to make a stand at those few who divide the whole?

It doesn't help that some of our elected, find comfort in regular folks turmoil and seek to profit or gain advantage over the same...

doesn't matter to me, I will continue to live life as I was raised, to respect everyone, to help anyone in need when I am in a position to, and deny the false divide created by those who wish to push folks to anger based on race, ethnicity, or social status...

We are all humans, we are diverse, I embrace the diversity... I think we all should...



posted on Jan, 6 2015 @ 01:06 AM
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Kinda shuts up all the racists & racism deniers folk who shout "white guilt" & "race baiter" when an LEO comes out & does this...


Very dignified and respectful.


All in all it's great news.



posted on Jan, 6 2015 @ 06:01 AM
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originally posted by: NthOther
Wow. We live in a society where cops get called heroes for not being racist goons.

Are we going to start handing out medals for not shooting people?

"Good work, Sarge. You managed not to shoot anyone this year. I guess you'll bonus after all."


Yea, I mean why bother acknowledging it right? No big deal, since cops are the only ones running around being racist and shooting people, so they don't deserve any acknowledgement for doing what so many here on ATS, and even more offline, keep saying they need to do.

Seriously though, I see you're point. It's a couple examples of people being decent people. But given all the vitriol surrounding this issue, I think it's pretty fair to acknowledge these acts when they take place. Do they need to be put up on a pedestal? I think so, yea. At least until the tide is turned. So that other cops who are on the fence see that it's possible to be engaged in your community and still be a cop.

Is it heroic? No, probably not. Is it a rare thing for such high ranking officials to do something like this? Yea, it is. Is it worthy of acknowledgement when it happens? Yea, it is.



posted on Jan, 6 2015 @ 09:22 AM
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a reply to: Shamrock6




Is it heroic? No, probably not. Is it a rare thing for such high ranking officials to do something like this? Yea, it is. Is it worthy of acknowledgement when it happens? Yea, it is.


Hero is a horribly misused word in American vernacular.

To stand by your values in the face of harassment and loss of livelihood is altruistic. All these men and others I could throw in are facing attacks from their fellow officers. Threats from the protected class are very dangerous. Police whistle blowers are extremely altruistic. Things will go badly for them and they know it. These are true heroes. LEO's that go to work everyday to honor their oaths are acting altruistically and doing their part to save the US from it's decline into fascism.

Those that stand up for civil rights in various protests and by filming police are taking significant risks and acting altruistically. I offer my personal thanks to these people.

LEO's that go to work and place their egos, narcissism and personal safety above their oaths to citizens are destroyers & villains. If you can't put your oath above your personal safety, you are unfit for duty. Get out and don't come back. If you think you have more rights than any other citizen, you are unfit for duty. Get out and don't come back.



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