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Nebraska, Oklahoma sue over Colorado marijuana law

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posted on Dec, 20 2014 @ 03:29 PM
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Nebraska Attorney General Jon Bruning has asked the U.S. Supreme Court to weigh in on the Colorado law that allows the recreational use of marijuana.

Bruning and Oklahoma Attorney General Scott Pruitt say it is in direct violation of the U.S. Constitution and should be struck down.

At a news conference Thursday, Bruning also disagreed with a position U.S. Attorney General Eric Holder took last year that the Department of Justice won't take action against Colorado or Washington, where voters legalized pot use for adults.

Nebraska, Oklahoma sue over Colorado marijuana law

What happened to States rights? You'd think of all states the so very red states of Nebraska and Oklahoma would stand by Colorado and support legalization as a states issue. What happened I must wonder? I had hoped this issue would bring people both left and right together but it's beginning to look like this is not the case. I found this comment rich coming from Nebraska Attorney general Jon Bruning:


"That is unconstitutional,
" Bruning said."


What happened to respecting the borders of other states? Or do we only respect their borders when it suits your political position??




posted on Dec, 20 2014 @ 03:33 PM
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Since the law was passed by the majority of the voters in Colorado, the state is only supporting their decision. Neighboring states should instead be suing the people bringing it back into their state, violating their laws. Or they could just legalize it. DUH!

ETA: The Feds are going to remove it (in some form and amount) from their illegal list. And if Nebraska and Oklahoma had tougher anti MJ laws, maybe people wouldn't be pushing the envelope. Get a clue, if you want to make it illegal, fine the hell out it. In some states, the DMV can go after court fines even though they're not related to a motor vehicle incident. They send a letter to you and void your drivers license until you get your fine paid.
edit on 20-12-2014 by StoutBroux because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 20 2014 @ 03:34 PM
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a reply to: Southern Guardian




What happened to States rights? You'd think of all states the so very red states of Nebraska and Oklahoma would stand by Colorado and support legalization as a states issue


They are just mad they didn't do it first.


Seriously though the legalization law passed in one state doesn't sit well with the old school thinking like this...



SO they have a problem with the state that did pass such laws.



posted on Dec, 20 2014 @ 03:37 PM
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a reply to: Southern Guardian

The text won't show up for me for some reason on your link but I can't believe they are doing this.
And coming from red states is very rich I agree, as they usually are the champions of state rights.



posted on Dec, 20 2014 @ 03:38 PM
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originally posted by: Southern Guardian
What happened to States rights?


The Supremacy Clause of the Constitution.

en.wikipedia.org...

Frankly, I was wondering when this argument was going to be brought up, and I think it is going to force the Federal Governments hand on legalization.



posted on Dec, 20 2014 @ 03:47 PM
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Further from the article:




The court accepts only a small fraction of cases it's asked to consider, but Bruning said he hopes it will take the suit because he believes the Colorado law undermines solutions Congress has designed to deal with a national problem.

The strain on the criminal justice system has been costly for Nebraskans, he said, although it's hard to quantify how costly.

Bruning said Colorado has become "ground zero" for marijuana production and trafficking, which has led to contraband being heavily trafficked in Nebraska.

The law, he said, has led to more marijuana arrests and criminal cases in Nebraska counties, particularly those bordering Colorado.


So there has been an effect on their States because of this law. Well I think in this case they may want to consider legalization themselves, it's worked well for Colorado. The cost of criminalization of marijuana is costly in itself, it's been costly well before Colorado and Washington legalized it. This should be a wake up call to Nebraskans and Oklahomans rather than a reason to sue Colorado which I confident will end up ruling against their favor.



posted on Dec, 20 2014 @ 03:48 PM
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What I love about this, is its not as if the other states aren't making money off of prosecuting the morons who KNEW the cops are waiting at the borders of their states to look for people coming back in from Colorado for search and seizure. Yeah, poor them.

Thank GOD I live in the GREEN state of Colorado!!!

If there is a heaven, Bill Hicks is playing the Mango Room every single night!


"To make marijuana against the law is like saying that God made a mistake.

Like on the seventh day God looked down, "There it is. My Creation, perfect and holy in all ways. Now I can rest. [Gives shocked expression] Oh me oh My!?!?! I left f**kin' pot everywhere!!! I should never have smoked that joint on the third day.

Hehe, that was the day I created the possum. Still gives me a chuckle. But if I leave pot everywhere, that's gonna give people the impression they're supposed to … use it.

Now I have to create Republicans."


en.wikiquote.org...


-NF



posted on Dec, 20 2014 @ 03:50 PM
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Actually, as an addendum....


What MORON drives to another state for a substance illegal in their own state but legal in another state to purchase?

Are they actually thinking that somehow the law will somehow follow them and protect them upon entering back into their own state where it is STILL ILLEGAL ?

Even the biggest stoners I know (I do not condone the use of illegal substances by anyone...hehehehehe ) are not THAT stupid. That is Bill & Ted or Beavis and Butthead stupid.


-NF
edit on 20-12-2014 by nullafides because:



posted on Dec, 20 2014 @ 03:51 PM
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a reply to: nullafides

NAW ,man.

www.usmessageboard.com...
CIA revived him.



posted on Dec, 20 2014 @ 03:52 PM
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Bruning is a lame duck. He didn't win re-election. IF this made it to the Supreme Court, he wouldn't be AG of NE. He doesn't share the views of many in the state. His Twitter feed is hilarious right now.

He only did this to keep his name in the news.



posted on Dec, 20 2014 @ 03:53 PM
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Dont feel so bad Nebraska(if thats your real name), our stuff even gets smuggled into Mexico now


+15 more 
posted on Dec, 20 2014 @ 03:55 PM
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a reply to: Southern Guardian

Dear average southern conservative, how do you feel about the nanny state and big government?

"Smaller gubmint, dammit! Git away from mah guns, dammit! State rights, dammit! Rabble, rabble, dammit!"


Ok, what about gay marriage, recreational marijuana, and non-Christian religions?

"Oh, the gays? The potheads? The heathens? Why isn't the gubmint making them live how I want them to?! They should do something about that!"



posted on Dec, 20 2014 @ 03:57 PM
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Isn't it state by state laws, though? The full state can't be held accountable if something is legal there are their citizens cross states borders and get caught. They know the law, and should be punished for it. Not people who are following the laws regarding it.



posted on Dec, 20 2014 @ 03:58 PM
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"No State shall make or enforce any law which shall abridge the privileges or immunities of citizens of the United States."


Sounds like it never should have been made illegal anyhow. They wrote that phrase in the 1860's, long before anyone even suggested outlawing the nation's most useful textile.



posted on Dec, 20 2014 @ 04:08 PM
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5 worst states toughest states to get busted with pot:
www.alternet.org...

Oklahoma - Paraplegic Jimmy Montgomery was sentenced to life in prison – later reduced to 10 years – after being caught with two ounces of medical pot in his wheelchair. After considerable public outcry, Montgomery was eventually granted early release on medical parole – though he later lost a leg from an ulcerated bed sore he developed while in prison. Rheumatoid arthritis patient Will Foster – convicted of marijuana cultivation in 1997 – received a similarly draconian 93-year sentence, later reduced to 20 years on appeal.

Texas. On an annual basis, no state arrests and criminally prosecutes more of its citizens for pot than does Texas. Marijuana arrests comprise over half of allannual arrests in the Lone Star State. It is easy to see why. In 2009, more than 97 percent of all Texas marijuana arrests — over 77,000 people — were for possession only. Those convicted face up to 180 days in jail and a $2,000 fine, even upon a first conviction.

Florida. According to a 2009 state-by-state analysis by researcher and former NORML Director Jon Gettman, no other state routinely punishes minor marijuana more severely than does the Sunshine State. Under Florida law, marijuana possession of 20 grams or less (about two-thirds of an ounce) is a criminal misdemeanor punishable by up to one-year imprisonment and a $1,000 fine. Marijuana possession over 20 grams, as well as the cultivation of even a single pot plant, are defined by law as felony offenses – punishable by up to five years in prison and a $5,000 fine.

4. Louisiana. On May 6 the Associated Press reported on the case of Cornell Hood II, who received a life sentencefor possessing two pounds of pot. Hood received the maximum sentence under Louisiana’s habitual drug offender law because he had three prior marijuana convictions, although none of them were significant enough to result in even a single day of jail time.

Multi-decade sentences for repeat pot offenders are hardly a rare occurrence. Under Louisiana law, a second pot possession conviction is classified as a felony offense, punishable by up to five years in prison. Three-time offenders face up to 20 years in prison. According to a 2008 exposepublished in the New Orleans City Business online, district attorneys are not hesitant to “target small-time marijuana users, sometimes caught with less than a gram of pot, and threaten them with lengthy prison sentences.”

Each year, cops make nearly 19,000 pot busts in the Bayou State – some 91 percent for simple possession – and according to Gettman, only three other states routinely punish minor offenders so severely.

Arizona. Forty years ago virtually every state in the nation defined marijuana possession as a felony offense. Today, only one state, Arizona, treats first-time pot possession in such an archaic and punitive manner. Under Arizona law, even minor marijuana possession offenses may be prosecuted as felony crimes, punishable by up to 18 months in jail and a $150,000 fine. According to Jon Gettman’s 2009 analysisonly Florida consistently treats minor marijuana possession cases more severely. Annually, some 22,000 Arizonans are busted for pot and 92 percent of those arrested are charged with possession only.


NOT one of the tough states.


www.mpp.org...
Nebraska is one of the 15 states that fine, instead of jail, individuals found in possession of a small amount of cannabis. First offense possession of up to an ounce of marijuana is a civil infraction punishable under Nebraska law by a $300 fine (and a possible drug education course) instead of jail time, and is a citation as opposed to an arrest. Second offense possession of up to an ounce carries a $400 fine and up to five days in jail, and third offense possession is punishable by up to a week in jail and a fine of $500. Second and third offense possession are misdemeanors, but are only citable, and not arrestable, offenses.


Although Oklahoma does have strict anti MJ laws, people STILL push the law. People who can should move to a more MJ friendly state or stop having MJ in the anti MJ state. A young person doesn't realize the permanent damage a harmless broken law can do to their future. It's not like they don't have non-criminal options. I have several friends who moved to other states where there is no criminality in having small amounts of MJ.
edit on 20-12-2014 by StoutBroux because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 20 2014 @ 04:11 PM
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a reply to: centhwevir1979

Well, blame it on the Mexicans....


Mexican immigrants introduce recreational use of marijuana leaf

After the Mexican Revolution of 1910, Mexican immigrants flooded into the U.S., introducing to American culture the recreational use of marijuana. The drug became associated with the immigrants, and the fear and prejudice about the Spanish-speaking newcomers became associated with marijuana. Anti-drug campaigners warned against the encroaching "Marijuana Menace," and terrible crimes were attributed to marijuana and the Mexicans who used it.



www.pbs.org...



- NF



posted on Dec, 20 2014 @ 04:15 PM
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Just because something gets "Legalized" doesn't mean "smaller" government.

The taxes keep big government just as big.

Making something "Legal" without taxes would be smaller government.

Ironic.



posted on Dec, 20 2014 @ 04:16 PM
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a reply to: nullafides

It was hearst that got the plant made illegal, that was just one of his 'reasons' that he pushed.

Timber needed to be the cash cow and hemp would not allow that.



posted on Dec, 20 2014 @ 04:19 PM
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a reply to: xuenchen

I guess that is one spin on it...

So big gov is not them telling you what is or is not ok to put in your body but just the taxing of it?

Think people wanting 'small' gov need to figure out what exactly that is.



posted on Dec, 20 2014 @ 04:23 PM
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originally posted by: xuenchen
Just because something gets "Legalized" doesn't mean "smaller" government.

The taxes keep big government just as big.

Making something "Legal" without taxes would be smaller government.

Ironic.



While I agree with you on this Xuenchen, I fail to see how legalization of specifically marijuana makes government bigger? If this is what your position is correct me if I'm wrong? People are given more choice, there's less government needed now in Colorado before it's not criminalized. I really fail to see how anybody could argue that legalization of this is anything but bringing about smaller government.



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