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Toilet replacemant fears.

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posted on Nov, 9 2014 @ 12:50 AM
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I've got the new toilet. I've visited the internet in regards to this topic. On Monday I will remove the old toilet. Hope what I find will not be too messy.

The wax ring and its proper use is my main fear. On the floor flange or on the toilet bottom prior to connection is the main question.


I'm kind of poor when it comes to money, so I am forced to deal with these handy-man questions when I don't really want to.

Centuries ago, the only question was where to put the crap.




posted on Nov, 9 2014 @ 01:32 AM
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Just buy a new wax ring if you don't have one already, they are only a couple bucks at home depot or Lowes. Because their so cheap I keep a couple on hand in the garage.

Shut off the water going to the toilet, there should be a shutoff right near the toilet and if not you can squash the line shut with a pair of vise grip pliers (they make special pliers for pinching off lines like that)

Unhook the waterline going into the bottom of the toilet by hand or a pair of pliers.
There are 2 caps, one on each side of the toilet at the floor. pull the caps off and take off the 2 nuts (usually 7/16" wrench)

Lift the toilet straight up off the bolts.

Throw the toilet into the neighbors yard ( j/k not really )

scrape all the old wax ring off the floor (a putty knife works good)
(if your lucky it will stick to the old toilet when you yank it off)

I stick the new wax ring on the bottom of the new toilet and pick up the toilet and slowly lower it onto the 2 bolts coming out of the floor.

Put the new washers over the 2 bolts at the base of the toilet and tighten them down, DON"T GO CRAZY. just real snug. You just want the toilet to be tight and not rock back and forth.

Hook the water line back up and turn the water on (or un-pinch the line)

Check for leaks. If no leaks your done. If something leaks try tightening whatever is leaking slowely till it stops without going crazy. Nothing on the toilet requires he-man strength tightening.


PS. if your in a cold area warm the wax ring so it's not hard. soft and pliable and it will seal good.
edit on 9-11-2014 by mwood because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 9 2014 @ 02:10 AM
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If you live where it gets hot, and the ring is old, there will be some gross looking mold. Wear some gloves and scrape it off. An old spatula works fine.
Hold your breath if you're prone to gagging.
It is not a pleasant job, but it has to be done occasionally. It's not really very hard if you know what you are doing.
It's one of the reasons plumbers are expensive.
Do it right and it will be longer before it has to be done again.



posted on Nov, 9 2014 @ 07:29 AM
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a reply to: droid56

no worries man....you'll be able to do it....its one of those deals where it only goes together one way...there are only a few steps and pieces...cant really mess it up.
i would think the most critical thing is that the wax ring is flat/level/flush, so clean the floor area off real good. when you put the toilet back on dont over tighten as it could crack the wax....just a pubic hair past snug.
then youre done...

put it like this...i am a fantastic mechanic but a complete idiot when it comes to home repair but even i was able to do this by myself....the toilet is heavy too. sure you already know that....
it does suck when you cant do your own home repair....my father and step dad are awesome...they can rewire #...cut holes in the ceiling and put fans in...all kinds of crap.
i have a hard time unclogging the sink. its just not my deal...

good with metal though...

also, just a little factoid that i learned when i was a kid...even a small pebble size chunk of porcelin(toilet) will break glass when chucked at it. im sure you dont need that info but there it is.

i think when you are done with the toilet r&r you will be surprised at how easy it was....



posted on Nov, 9 2014 @ 07:41 AM
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a reply to: mwood

Perfect explanation Wood, I've swapped out many a toilet in my day, and that was 100% on spot.
Here's a video:



posted on Nov, 9 2014 @ 07:49 AM
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a reply to: droid56

I'll add a couple of details to the excellent instructions that already have been given here.

It well may be that removing the existing bolts are a problem. They can be the biggest, more frustrating problem when the bolts (sometimes iron, sometimes brass) get corroded and they they tend to not be held secure on the floor flange and they simply turn rather than only the nut unscrewing. Often the work area is confined and using a hacksaw is difficult. A Dremel tool with a steel/carbide grinding bit can be god-sent in that situation. I strongly advise you, before you do anything else as you start the job, to see if the nuts come off easily. If not, you've got a problem.

As for the wax ring, there at least three sizes available that I know about and some different styles. I advise to get one that has a plastic sleeve that extends down into the floor mount. It will prevent leaks if there is any problem with the levelness of the floor. Once the commode is placed in position over the bolts--buy new ones also--simply set on the stool, weighting it down, to help compress the wax ring. Snugging the commode down by only tightening the bolts is a chance to break the porcelain flange of the bowl! Anyway, don't attempt to snug down the commode bolts all at the same session. The wax takes a little time to slowly compress and spread. So tighten the bowl in stages over a day or two and check again in a week or so.

As for the old commode, which of course is heavy, I broke mine old one up with a hammer and put a few pieces in the trash over a period of time so as to not give the garbage may a hernia.



posted on Nov, 9 2014 @ 11:11 AM
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originally posted by: HomerinNC
a reply to: mwood

Perfect explanation Wood, I've swapped out many a toilet in my day, and that was 100% on spot.
Here's a video:


Thanks, I have done a couple in my lifetime.

Just swapped out my "green" water saver toilets because I didn't like how they flushed. Found some old ones in great shape from a local motel upgrade (since ya can't buy them new anymore) and got them and installed them.

Got good flushing power again.

My septic tank is about 300' from the house and 1.18 gallons just don't wash "stuff" down as good as it should. I am on my own well so the water usage isn't an issue for me. I figure what extra I use goes right back into the water table eventually.



posted on Nov, 9 2014 @ 04:03 PM
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I use to help a building contractor friend with renovations. We replaced lots of toilets. Sometimes it went so smoothly
it was scary. I got in the habit of having my big ShopVac wet\dry vacuum handy to vacuum up the water in the event of spills, or even to vac the water out of the old toilet.
The YT video that was posted looks very good.



posted on Mar, 18 2016 @ 08:18 AM
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originally posted by: Aliensun
a reply to: droid56

I'll add a couple of details to the excellent instructions that already have been given here.

It well may be that removing the existing bolts are a problem. They can be the biggest, more frustrating problem when the bolts (sometimes iron, sometimes brass) get corroded and they they tend to not be held secure on the floor flange and they simply turn rather than only the nut unscrewing. Often the work area is confined and using a hacksaw is difficult. A Dremel tool with a steel/carbide grinding bit can be god-sent in that situation. I strongly advise you, before you do anything else as you start the job, to see if the nuts come off easily. If not, you've got a problem.

As for the wax ring, there at least three sizes available that I know about and some different styles. I advise to get one that has a plastic sleeve that extends down into the floor mount. It will prevent leaks if there is any problem with the levelness of the floor. Once the commode is placed in position over the bolts--buy new ones also--simply set on the stool, weighting it down, to help compress the wax ring. Snugging the commode down by only tightening the bolts is a chance to break the porcelain flange of the bowl! Anyway, don't attempt to snug down the commode bolts all at the same session. The wax takes a little time to slowly compress and spread. So tighten the bowl in stages over a day or two and check again in a week or so.

As for the old commode, which of course is heavy, I broke mine old one up with a hammer and put a few pieces in the trash over a period of time so as to not give the garbage may a hernia.
sometimes you can reset the bolts( depending on the type of anchor) by overtightening them or using a wonder bar pry up on on them providing you with enough grab to keep them from spinning as you release the nuts.




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