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What did the choosing of Barabbas do to future generations? What "test" is in store for us?

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posted on Nov, 6 2014 @ 03:04 PM
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According to the four canonical gospels and the non-canonical Gospel of Peter there was a prevailing Passover custom in Jerusalem that allowed or required Pilate, the praefectus or governor of Judea, to commute one prisoner's death sentence by popular acclaim, and the "crowd" (ochlos), "the Jews" and "the multitude" in some sources, were offered a choice of whether to have either Barabbas or Jesus released from Roman custody. According to the Synoptic Gospels of Matthew,[1] Mark,[2] and Luke,[3] and the accounts in John[4] and the Gospel of Peter, the crowd chose Barabbas to be released and Jesus of Nazareth to be crucified. Pilate is portrayed as reluctantly yielding to the insistence of the crowd. A passage found only in the Gospel of Matthew has the crowd saying, "Let his blood be upon us and upon our children."[5]




( KARMA )

Abuse an animal enough times it will turn on you!

So with that said I'm just wondering why no one has ever thought of the back lash to come for choosing barabbas over jesus. And don't say it's because jesus knows that that had to happen he was not in a age of advancements where his agenda could truly flourish and knowing that he would walk the world again he had to sacrifice himself for his future self.

Be killed now so my future self with the right achievements around me so i won't have to when my agenda can flourish.

But would we choose barabbas again? Just how much and how closely should the man be followed. After all they are bound by time and space him and jesus.

The thing about forgiveness is. You have to remember exactly what you forgave. Otherwise someone will rob you of your life.

Thoughts?
edit on 6-11-2014 by metalholic because: (no reason given)




posted on Nov, 6 2014 @ 03:10 PM
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A passage found only in the Gospel of Matthew has the crowd saying, "Let his blood be upon us and upon our children."



posted on Nov, 6 2014 @ 03:19 PM
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Wasn't it all pre-ordained?

Barabbas was a cult figure, an hero in all likelihood with the people of Jerusalem and Jesus had been called a Blasphemer.

Given the times and the religious fervour of the times, Jesus' fate was sealed by being tagged a blasphemer.

Who to save? A rebel or blasphemer?

Would Barabbas be chosen today? I guess it would depend on what part of the world he decided to return.



posted on Nov, 6 2014 @ 03:32 PM
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a reply to: Cobaltic1978

Well technically Jesus was killed because he upset the current world order. He talked of a world where everyone had a right to life liberty and pursuit of happiness without money and other materialistic things that influence murder and judgement among people that cause people to belittle others and what not.

Infact he saw that the church's were corrupt and talked of a cleansing of the world where truth would light up the darkness and people could live in peace. He taught that the Lord should not be feared as priests would go on and on about hell and damnation for money. Corrupt agendas.

But that the lord should be understood.

Barabbas was chosen over Jesus because of such corrupt and feeble mindsets.

Would this happen again in today's world? Do we understand better then we did then?



posted on Nov, 6 2014 @ 03:47 PM
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a reply to: metalholic

What if this is an allegory for our choosing our ego over that enlightened part of us after the light has been revealed to us? That light within is crucified by us, dies for our desires, is condemned to hell, but ultimately conquers death and resurrects thereafter. Falling into this trap isn't the end of the line. It seems to be part of the plan. Only once you realize how dismal the world is once the light has been crucified can you understand the benefits of its presence. Who are we? The doubting Thomas, Peter who denies the light, Judas who identifies him and hands him over to be crucified? This isn't a story of the past, but a story of what we go through in our own personal lives if we have a relationship to that transcendent illumination.



posted on Nov, 6 2014 @ 03:49 PM
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a reply to: Nechash

If I could run from it too I would!
edit on 6-11-2014 by metalholic because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 6 2014 @ 03:53 PM
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a reply to: metalholic

Yahweh is the Son of God. Elohim is the Father and Ruach Elohim is the Mother. In Genesis 3, it is stated that Yahweh created the Snake. In the book of Revelation, it is revealed that Satan is the Snake. In Genesis 9, Elohim (Father) made a promise to bless all of mankind with the Rainbow, or all the colors of the nations. Yahweh selected ONE nation to bless. He used that nation to shed blood.

Genesis 9

6 “Whoever sheds human blood,
by humans shall their blood be shed;
for in the image of God
has God made mankind.

This was Elohim (Father) speaking what would happen to Yahweh in the first century when he was baptized into the involution and river of life. As the Son of God, he paid for the blood that was shed. Why? He created Satan. The fall of mankind is directly related to the bloodshed on Adam when Yahweh took the rib to make Eve. From that point, all of creation fell because of Yahweh's choice and not mankind's choice.

With that said, the people were given a choice to listen to the Son and forgive. They refused. Of course, they may not have know who the Son of God was in relation to Yahweh. Today, most people fail to see this as well. Equally, they fail to read the actual book to see that Yahweh committed atrocities on mankind trying to serve one nation over all nations.

Today, what will we see? The Son of God must come and love enemies. He cannot destroy humanity or even harm a hair on anyone's head. He must bless the nations. So far, after 2000 years, we have experienced continual war. It is said he has been at he right hand of God this entire time. He is the head of the church. What has the church done in his name over the last 2000 years? Shed blood, continually.

His promise in Revelation is to destroy 1/3 of humanity. Shortly after blessing Nineveh, then calling it an important nation, he promptly wiped it from the Earth a few prophets later. Jesus said the only sign they would get is the sign of Jonah, or the saving of Nineveh. What happens after he saves it? Let's hope he follows his words this time around and loves his enemies.

According to 1 Corinthians 15, we will see this:

20 But Christ has indeed been raised from the dead, the firstfruits of those who have fallen asleep. 21 For since death came through a man, the resurrection of the dead comes also through a man. 22 For as in Adam all die, so in Christ all will be made alive. 23 But each in turn: Christ, the firstfruits; then, when he comes, those who belong to him. 24 Then the end will come, when he hands over the kingdom to God the Father after he has destroyed all dominion, authority and power. 25 For he must reign until he has put all his enemies under his feet. 26 The last enemy to be destroyed is death. 27 For he “has put everything under his feet.” Now when it says that “everything” has been put under him, it is clear that this does not include God himself, who put everything under Christ. 28 When he has done this, then the Son himself will be made subject to him who put everything under him, so that God may be all in all.

He puts enemies under His feet. Feet in the Bible is a euphemism for the genitalia, or seed of the nation. I am not sure if this is the case here, but it would seem likely since the seed is the entire story from Adam to Christ. The enemy is made the footstool.

It says he will destroy "all dominion, authority and power." Typically, this is done by either causing division that leads man to destroy himself, or a direct conflict involving Christ as the one doing the destruction. Since his own words are to love others, even enemies, He would become a contradiction to Himself if this is His selected path. Love cannot come from hate, any more than education can come from war. Education comes from teaching and we have not had good teaching for 2000 years. Most Biblical symbols are unknown to the vast majority of people on Earth. Even if you tell someone, the information is blocked on a subconscious level. I have demonstrated this here on ATS with countless threads trying to show people the truth behind the ordinances.

Delusion is intentional. As Revelation states, the nations are deceived by the Snake. This is the same snake created by Yahweh. He is the accuser of mankind and the adversary of man. The Snake matches the one that created him. The same one must kill the snake. How? By causing untold suffering on humanity. Be sure this is the same path that has transpired over the last 6000 years. Are we to believe it will be any different?

Let's pray it is. If not, we know who the liar is.




edit on 6-11-2014 by AlephBet because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 6 2014 @ 04:02 PM
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a reply to: AlephBet

Jesus was the incarnate of Sanu who walked the Earth to complete a ritual for a later time when mankind should be intelligent enough to know who there lord is.

What I'm getting at with this thread. What is the cause and effect of the whole Barabbas situation?
edit on 6-11-2014 by metalholic because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 6 2014 @ 04:41 PM
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a reply to: metalholic

Israel could have forgiven Yahweh. They didn't. It's the same today with Atheists. They use Yahweh as an excuse to not believe. In reality, it is their sin reflective of Yahweh. We are all an image of the original. We were created as a division of God's image, BOTH male and female. Yahweh divided us and still does today. Is it for a reason? We don't know, but we do know war hurts. Do unto others is what I say. Love your enemies. I assume Yahweh is counting on us to do this, yet why would we if He is returning to wipe humanity from the Earth? I hope for a different outcome. 6000 years of war tells me it may not come out as we hope.



posted on Nov, 6 2014 @ 07:39 PM
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a reply to: AlephBet

Check out this gnarly bodacious plan right. So like Jesus was the alter ego of Barabbas and Barabbas was the alter ego of Jesus. And Barabbas was like this crazy psychopath who killed people. So like when they were like choose between this gnarly Jesus dude. Or you could totally kick it with this crazy dude Barabbas.

They were like let's get this Bloodbath started bring on the Barabbas dude. We don't need that peace loving lie exposing SOB around here. Like total bummer dude.




posted on Nov, 6 2014 @ 07:59 PM
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Yeeeeeeeeeesssssss.


originally posted by: Nechash
a reply to: metalholic

What if this is an allegory for our choosing our ego over that enlightened part of us after the light has been revealed to us? That light within is crucified by us, dies for our desires, is condemned to hell, but ultimately conquers death and resurrects thereafter. Falling into this trap isn't the end of the line. It seems to be part of the plan. Only once you realize how dismal the world is once the light has been crucified can you understand the benefits of its presence. Who are we? The doubting Thomas, Peter who denies the light, Judas who identifies him and hands him over to be crucified? This isn't a story of the past, but a story of what we go through in our own personal lives if we have a relationship to that transcendent illumination.



posted on Nov, 6 2014 @ 09:11 PM
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a reply to: metalholic

Today, the justice system is based on secular morality rather than religious, so if one person killed many people, and another person is accused of saying blasphemy against God, then they'll let the one accused of blasphemy go in the name of freedom of speech and religion.

So, in America and Europe, they'll let Jesus go and keep Barabbas.



posted on Nov, 6 2014 @ 09:30 PM
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a reply to: arpgme

While that's correct I'm afraid it won't be that simple.

Jesus will play a solitary confinement personality meaning he'll most likely be a recluse at some point in his life. Barabbas will be out trying to win the hearts and minds of people.

Someone will point fingers and at the end of the day sides will be chosen.

And it the decision won't consequently be a broken temple.. it'll be more severe with dire consequences.

Gotta love the lord he really wants to know where your heart lies.



posted on Nov, 7 2014 @ 07:00 AM
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---Wikipedia may not be the best source for information; but here something to add to the discussion.---

Barabbas or Jesus Barabbas (a Hellenization of the Aramaic bar abba בר אבא, literally "son of the father" or "Jesus, son of the Father" respectively) is a figure in the accounts of the Passion of Christ, in which he is the insurrectionary whom Pontius Pilate freed at the Passover feast in Jerusalem, instead of Jesus.

According to the four canonical gospels and the non-canonical Gospel of Peter there was a prevailing Passover custom in Jerusalem that allowed or required Pilate, the praefectus or governor of Judea, to commute one prisoner's death sentence by popular acclaim, and the "crowd" (ochlos), "the Jews" and "the multitude" in some sources, were offered a choice of whether to have either Barabbas or Jesus released from Roman custody. According to the Synoptic Gospels of Matthew,[1] Mark,[2] and Luke,[3] and the accounts in John[4] and the Gospel of Peter, the crowd chose Barabbas to be released and Jesus of Nazareth to be crucified. Pilate is portrayed as reluctantly yielding to the insistence of the crowd. A passage found only in the Gospel of Matthew has the crowd saying, "Let his blood be upon us and upon our children."[5]

The story of Barabbas has special social significance because it has historically been used to lay the blame for the crucifixion of Jesus on the Jews, and to justify antisemitism—an interpretation, known as Jewish deicide, dismissed by Pope Benedict XVI in his 2011 book Jesus of Nazareth, in which he changes the translation of "ochlos" in Matthew to mean the "crowd", rather than to mean the Jewish people.[6][7]



Contents
1 Biblical account
2 Name
3 Other interpretations 3.1 Possible parable

4 Depictions in fiction
5 See also
6 References
7 External links


Biblical account

Matthew refers to Barabbas only as a "notorious prisoner".[8] Mark and Luke further refer to Barabbas as one involved in a stasis, a riot.[9] Robert Eisenman states that John 18:40 refers to Barabbas as a lēstēs ("bandit"), "the word Josephus always employs when talking about Revolutionaries".[10]

Three gospels state that there was a custom at Passover during which the Roman governor would release a prisoner of the crowd's choice; Mark 15:6, Matthew 27:15, and John 18:39. Later copies of Luke contain a corresponding verse (Luke 23:17), although it is not present in the earliest manuscripts, and may be a later gloss to bring Luke into conformity.[11]

No custom of releasing prisoners in Jerusalem at Passover or any other time is recorded in any historical document other than the gospels.[12]


Barabbas's name appears as bar-Abbas in the Greek texts of the gospels. It is derived ultimately from the Aramaic בר-אבא, Bar-abbâ, "son of the father". Some ancient manuscripts of Matthew 27:16–17 have the full name of Barabbas as "Jesus Barabbas" and this was probably the name as originally written in the text.[13] Early church father Origen was troubled by the fact that his copies of the gospels gave Barabbas' name as "Jesus Barabbas" and declared that since it was impossible he could have had such a holy name, "Jesus" must have been added to Barabbas' name by a heretic.[14] It is highly likely that later scribes, copying the passage, removed the name "Jesus" from "Jesus Barabbas" to avoid dishonour to the name of Jesus the Messiah.[15]

Abba has been found as a personal name in a 1st-century burial at Giv'at ha-Mivtar, and Abba also appears as a personal name frequently in the Gemara section of the Talmud, dating from AD 200–400.[16] It could be argued that these findings support "Barabbas" being used to indicate the son of a person named Abba or Abbas (a patronymic). But, ultimately, he is known as Barabbas, not Barabba.

Other interpretations

According to historian Max Dimont, the story of Barabbas as related in the gospels lacks credibility from the Roman standpoint, as it presents the Roman authority, Pontius Pilate, backed by overwhelming military might, being cowed by a small crowd of unarmed civilians into releasing a prisoner condemned to death for insurrection against the Roman empire. Any Roman governor who had done that would have swiftly faced execution himself, according to Dimont.[14] Benjamin Urrutia, co-author of The Logia of Yeshua: The Sayings of Jesus, agrees with a well known theory in biblical scholarship [14] as presented for instance by Hyam Maccoby, which says that Yeshua Bar Abba or Jesus Barabbas must be none other than Jesus of Nazareth, and that the choice between two prisoners is a fiction. However, Urrutia opposes the notion that Jesus may have either led or planned a violent insurrection. Jesus was a strong advocate of "turning the other cheek". Jesus, in this view, must have been the planner and leader of the Jewish nonviolent resistance to Pilate's plan to set up Roman Eagle standards on Jerusalem's Temple Mount. The story of this successful resistance is told by Josephus—who does not say who the leader was, but does tell of Pilate's crucifixion of Jesus just two paragraphs later in a passage whose authenticity is heavily disputed.[17]Template:Citation invalid

Possible parable

This practice of releasing a prisoner is said by Magee[18] and others to be an element in a literary creation of Mark, who needed to have a contrast to the true "son of the father" in order to set up an edifying contest, in a form of parable.

Dennis R. MacDonald, in The Homeric Epics and the Gospel of Mark, notes that a similar episode to the one that occurs in Mark—of a crowd picking one figure over another figure similar to the other—occurred in The Odyssey, where Odysseus entered the palace disguised as a beggar and defeated his wife's suitors to reclaim his throne.[19] MacDonald suggests Mark borrowed from this section of The Odyssey and used it to pen the Barabbas tale, only this time Jesus – the protagonist – loses to highlight the cruelty of Jesus' persecutors.[19] However, this theory is rejected by other scholars.[20]



posted on Nov, 7 2014 @ 07:15 AM
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Leviticus 16:3-13

"3 Thus shall Aaron come into the holy place: with a young bullock for a sin offering, and a ram for a burnt offering. 4 He shall put on the holy linen coat, and he shall have the linen breeches upon his flesh, and shall be girded with a linen girdle, and with the linen mitre shall he be attired : these are holy garments; therefore shall he wash his flesh in water, and so put them on . 5 And he shall take of the congregation of the children of Israel two kids of the goats for a sin offering, and one ram for a burnt offering. 6 And Aaron shall offer his bullock of the sin offering, which is for himself, and make an atonement for himself, and for his house. 7 And he shall take the two goats, and present them before the LORD at the door of the tabernacle of the congregation. 8 And Aaron shall cast lots upon the two goats; one lot for the LORD, and the other lot for the scapegoat. 9 And Aaron shall bring the goat upon which the LORD'S lot fell , and offer him for a sin offering. 10 But the goat, on which the lot fell to be the scapegoat, shall be presented alive before the LORD, to make an atonement with him, and to let him go for a scapegoat into the wilderness. 11 And Aaron shall bring the bullock of the sin offering, which is for himself, and shall make an atonement for himself, and for his house, and shall kill the bullock of the sin offering which is for himself: 12 And he shall take a censer full of burning coals of fire from off the altar before the LORD, and his hands full of sweet incense beaten small, and bring it within the vail: 13 And he shall put the incense upon the fire before the LORD, that the cloud of the incense may cover the mercy seat that is upon the testimony, that he die not"

---Can you find any similarities in the text and Jesus and Barabbas?



posted on Nov, 7 2014 @ 08:57 AM
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edit on 7-11-2014 by Neoleon because: off topic drift



posted on Nov, 7 2014 @ 09:42 PM
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a reply to: metalholic What did the choosing of Barabbas do to future generations? What test is in store for us?

If you lived then I suppose would impact your progeny (perhaps your parents would have been perceived as Jesus haters) 300 years later (advent/invent any Christian variable all denominational offshoot hokus pocus).
Maybe Barabbas was innocent and never should have been tried in the first place (the Universe steps in and rights a wrong).
The Universe is thwarting an archetype it KNOWS is going to pop into MAJOR BEING and knows IT will have to pay for this debacle eventually; because as fair is square has to allow for other ideas: Krishna, Mohammed and Buddha to also 'Pop' into existence.
If one were living in Jerusalem at that time period, you would have been Greek, Hebrew, Roman; who knows--imported slave races and were most likely Pagan; so would not communicate anything to anyone other than a man was crucified today as a heretic (no reason would have been given; it was just another spectacle death).
Not sure why you are placing a 'value' upon a perceived 'test' and how that relates to anyone.
Jesus absolved all sins future, present and past for all man; so there is no Karmic blowback. I'm not sure why Karma is a valid discussion; unless Jesus bungled the job and management turned the other cheek (no finger pointing necessary).


edit on 7-11-2014 by vethumanbeing because: (no reason given)



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