It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

Mysterious Explosion captured in the Milky Way

page: 3
44
<< 1  2    4 >>

log in

join
share:

posted on Nov, 5 2014 @ 07:36 AM
link   
a reply to: funbox

Actually, your own enhancement shows the object breaking up as it initially hits the atmosphere, with one piece traveling in a different trajectory before they both explode.

The curvature of the earth and they way the object explodes seems quite obvious to me. It's a bolide (as others have pointed out) that is hitting the atmosphere at such an angle that it basically has no chance of further penetration. It's like if you tried to dive into the ocean from 50,000 feet up, but with a wingsuit and at a shallow angle. Wouldn't be much of you left.




posted on Nov, 5 2014 @ 08:20 AM
link   
a reply to: funbox

im thinking maybe it was a collision between two meteorites



posted on Nov, 5 2014 @ 10:18 AM
link   

originally posted by: Baddogma
That is so totally cool!

I've seen some meteoric action in my time, but never one that dispersed in such a manner that was so easy to see... meaning I've never seen a ring of dispersing residue like that.

Pretty darned lucky catch... and beautiful.



Earth is indeed a beatiful place, we should preserve it while we could :/



posted on Nov, 5 2014 @ 10:59 AM
link   
Watching how the wind currents in the upper atmosphere rapidly twist and tear apart meteor trails is really cool to watch. Using binoculars during a meteor shower, after you see a bright meteor, use the binoculars to observe how the atmosphere twists up the tail, which is usually very hard to see without them.

This capture was great, because the meteor was coming almost straight towards the observer. What looks like a ring is probably looking down a huge spiral that the atmosphere twisted the tail into. Excellent shot, and one for the science books.



posted on Nov, 5 2014 @ 11:32 AM
link   
Do none of you understand electricity's role in the universe?



posted on Nov, 5 2014 @ 11:51 AM
link   
a reply to: hillbilly4rent

Go home Tardis, you're drunk.



posted on Nov, 5 2014 @ 12:48 PM
link   
WHAT!
you can see in the video
that some thing like a meter hits the atmosphere
and blows up.

it hits fast from about a 10 oçlock angle.
watch the video.

and they think its the galaxy exploding???



posted on Nov, 5 2014 @ 12:56 PM
link   
a reply to: funbox

Yeah Fun, that bothers me, too. Usually, when something rocky or "metal-y" vaporizes against the atmosphere there's a explosive flash ... not a relatively gentle "poof" and smoke ring ... it IS an unusual event and I hope someone more versed at computing the forces expended looks at it... I'm a bit curious.

Did the ISS drop a bag of angel feathers? Was it an angel? Heh... ETA though the other's explanations seem reasonable re: angle... still, a one in a zillion capture.


edit on 11/5/2014 by Baddogma because: (no reason given)

edit on 11/5/2014 by Baddogma because: angle to angel... stupid predictive textingand auto correct!



posted on Nov, 5 2014 @ 01:08 PM
link   
a reply to: jaffo

Thats impressive stuff. I wonder if that was a supernova?



posted on Nov, 5 2014 @ 02:39 PM
link   
a reply to: DeadSeraph

so your saying its like a stone in water, its trajectory was altered mildly as it passed through into the meniscus/ stratosphere? .. or maybe this explosion happened higher up where the winds are fast and the air is mega thin , albeit hot , strangely?

maybe it exploded in spritesville ?, where all sorts of unusual energy dispersals can be witnessed,

if only we had more data


another odd thing that struck me is how much the stars turn, at least an arc or two, would suggest a fairly long sequence, 20 minuets or above.. which suggests a slower moving meteor.. kind of like the recent Russian meteor , albeit with a lower atmospheric shock wave





funbox



posted on Nov, 5 2014 @ 03:01 PM
link   
a reply to: funbox

Hey funbox, at the bottom of the previous page I described it kind of similar to bullets in water. If you've ever seen the Mythbusters episode where they shoot bullets into water, it was surprising just how fast something with the speed of a bullet quickly succumbs to the water.
Now, you need to stop thinking about the atmosphere in terms of 'thin air' - of course it is to us - but to a celestial bullet it is hitting a 'liquid'. The kilometers of atmosphere is what saves us from most of these getting through (not some electric universe theory). And once you get your mind thinking of the atmosphere as like a secondary liquid layer on earth (secondary as in to the ocean) it will start making sense.

Belly flop onto a pool.

Sounds silly at first, but ever stick your hand out a car that going 100km/h and rotate it to catch the wind? You will feel a strong pressure, now imagine standing on the roof of the same car. The chances to be able to stay standing without being 'blown' off would be slim at best, but boost that speed by quite a few more thousand km/h and it would be like hitting a wall.

edit;
In regards to the stars moving = slow meteor, you have to remember that the Milky Way does not always look so bright and glamorous, there is some slight trickery going on. That is that the camera lens is open for 5 seconds per photo (approx guesstimate) to soak up all that extra light that our lousy peepers struggle with. So, that is increasing the visual light intensity of the meteor and making it seem to last a little longer than usual.

edit on 5-11-2014 by Qumulys because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 5 2014 @ 03:59 PM
link   
a reply to: Qum ulys




edit;
In regards to the stars moving = slow meteor, you have to remember that the Milky Way does not always look so bright and glamorous, there is some slight trickery going on. That is that the camera lens is open for 5 seconds per photo (approx guesstimate) to soak up all that extra light that our lousy peepers struggle with. So, that is increasing the visual light intensity of the meteor and making it seem to last a little longer than usual.


this is the odd thing , I don't think this camera is taking long exposures.

five frames from the sequence
your guestimate says this action took 25 seconds, that doesn't seem right to me , my earlier calculation says the same



maybe its one of the new cameras that can achieve very high iso settings , beyond a hundred thousand even


originally posted by: Baddogma
a reply to: funbox

Yeah Fun, that bothers me, too. Usually, when something rocky or "metal-y" vaporizes against the atmosphere there's a explosive flash ... not a relatively gentle "poof" and smoke ring ... it IS an unusual event and I hope someone more versed at computing the forces expended looks at it... I'm a bit curious.

Did the ISS drop a bag of angel feathers? Was it an angel? Heh... ETA though the other's explanations seem reasonable re: angle... still, a one in a zillion capture.



did you try doing a Phage dance? this is his forte, or is he holding back because something isn't right ?


funbox




edit on 5-11-2014 by funbox because: photonic wolves angulate slightly through a vast atmospheric oceon *SuperSargasso Sea*



posted on Nov, 5 2014 @ 04:21 PM
link   
a reply to: funbox

Star for your questioning mind

When I've done star movement videos, once you get over 30 seconds, you start seeing star trails but once you get below 3 seconds you don't capture the faint light of the Milky Way. So that's where my estimate for shutter time comes from, hopefully it's a reasonable yard stick? So I think the five frames fits rather nicely, sure to normal human eyesight - this would last 1 or two seconds. But think about when metal get's reallllly hot, almost white hot - once you remove the heat source and watch the metal, you will see it cool and lose it's glow but it might take 30 seconds to stop glowing. So I think (and may be wrong) that the extra open shutter time is catching the glowing (but quickly cooling) time of the streak that is usually too dim for us to still see after more than a couple of seconds to the naked human eye.

Does that help? (I'm not very good at explaining sciencey stuffs)





In addition, that great gif you posted certainly shows to me that the streaks movement does not line up with the movement in relation to background stars therefore further pointing to a localised meteor.

(edit) Phage dance? I'm far too sloppy for his pin point lock 'n' pop accurate dance.

I'd love him to try and explain what I'm seeing better, he has a knack to explain these things properly (or fireball, this is his specialty).

edit on 5-11-2014 by Qumulys because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 5 2014 @ 04:58 PM
link   
a reply to: Qumulys

quite a lot of action for the time hypothesized, see gif , the initial streak and tangent are roughly 20 seconds of real time by our earlier guestimates



time... yep that time where the gif juice just ran out


funbox



posted on Nov, 5 2014 @ 06:47 PM
link   
a reply to: funbox

Yep, quite a bit of time! But I think it all fits pretty nicely as to what one would expect to see. I know with the meteor 2008 TC3 (previous page) the cloudy exploded dust trails that were left were all they were able to see, I think from memory they were about 30 mins late to the remote area (they had only limited knowledge it was going to be a direct hit and barely made it to try and find it). But it still left a similar whispy trace of dust getting pulled apart and strung out in beautiful patterns dictated by the high altitude winds. That stayed visible for quite some extra time because of the rising sun.

But there is certainly a lot of action close to the camera in respect to the background stars which points (I think) quite clearly to the culprit.



posted on Nov, 5 2014 @ 06:53 PM
link   
This was discussed here:
www.abovetopsecret.com...



posted on Nov, 5 2014 @ 07:02 PM
link   
Wow that was a nice one, it looked like something came from below it at the same time and collided or shot the comet.

Very impressive

Thanks





posted on Nov, 5 2014 @ 07:04 PM
link   
a reply to: Blue Shift
Different video than the one here, but extremely helpful



Handily he lets us know that it was 10 second exposures funbox. Looks like an extremely similar outcome over a similar proposed time we were discussing.

I wonder if it was the same one captured by another photographer from another angle!? It was on the same date... (One was in South Dakota, the other Iowa) Very interesting! Looks very similar




Taking a time-lapse this morning (CANON 6D 35MM @ f1.4 10" ISO1600 with a 10" delay between frames) and captured what I first thought was just a plane passing by... but I didn't see it in any other frames and what I assume is a vapor trail was rather odd. Is this a meteor? Thanks for any input. Captured frames (unedited besides crop) below:




WOW. So many messages in my inbox. Let me try to provide a little more information on the images here: Captured today (10/16/14) between 4:30AM-4:50AM central. The location was the Ashton-Wildwood County Park, Iowa. I took this set as part of a time-lapse shoot and it was my last angle of the evening/morning. The angle is shooting through a clearing in the trees that happened to be very near my camp-site. I setup the shot and headed to bed, so unfortunately I didn't see this with my own eyes.

(Is the one who took this video Blue Shift refers too)

Where as we have


Shot on October 16th, 2014 by Wes Eisenhauer outside of Custer, South Dakota.

for the one the thread is about. Anyone good with maps and parallaxes and stuff like that? *hint*

Cheers thanks Blue Shift

edit on 5-11-2014 by Qumulys because: (no reason given)


Edit to also add a map of the two spots that captured it, hopefully someone can track the stars!

edit on 5-11-2014 by Qumulys because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 5 2014 @ 08:52 PM
link   
a reply to: funbox




did you try doing a Phage dance? this is his forte, or is he holding back because something isn't right ?


come on man... It's obviously a meteor. What do you think it is? A UFO being shot down by the men in black? An intergalactic spaceship exploding deep in the milky way?



posted on Nov, 6 2014 @ 04:41 AM
link   
Some serious Signs in da sky lately!




top topics



 
44
<< 1  2    4 >>

log in

join