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GDS 3000 Water Generator - Is this real?

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posted on Oct, 26 2014 @ 07:16 PM
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well if they are fraud at least you can get your money back

If you are not satisfied with our product or products within 15 days of delivery GDS technologies will refund your money in full. If unit is damaged no refund, must be in clean new working order. After the 15 days pass a replacement program in effect for the balance of your warranty.




posted on Oct, 26 2014 @ 07:31 PM
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a reply to: Dolby_X

I have an underwater bridge to atlantis for sale.



posted on Oct, 26 2014 @ 07:38 PM
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originally posted by: Dolby_X
well if they are fraud at least you can get your money back

If you are not satisfied with our product or products within 15 days of delivery GDS technologies will refund your money in full. If unit is damaged no refund, must be in clean new working order. After the 15 days pass a replacement program in effect for the balance of your warranty.

Yes. Until you try to use it. Then I am sure your calls go to voicemail.



posted on Oct, 26 2014 @ 07:41 PM
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Here's a discussion occurring on peswiki about these devices.

peswiki.com...:GDS_Technologies%27_Portable_Water_Generators

Mostly waiting for answers...
edit on 26/10/14 by TRiPWiRE because: (no reason given)

edit on 26/10/14 by TRiPWiRE because: Stupid hyperlink not posting properly!



posted on Oct, 26 2014 @ 08:12 PM
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a reply to: Dolby_X

eBay scammers offer returns. Makes them look legit. Problem is saying is not the same as doing. They'll have done a runner as soon as they've taken your money.
edit on 26-10-2014 by GetHyped because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 27 2014 @ 05:16 AM
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a reply to: Dolby_X

Theres your out .If it didn't work to start with how can you return it working .



posted on Oct, 27 2014 @ 06:22 AM
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400 units x $5000= $2000000 and that is only the 5000 watt units.

They likely will only ship when they have sold all the units.

Then they take a fast trip to a country without extradition.

What is inside the box tells it all if you know what you are looking at.
I see two deep cycle batteries and a 4000 watt inverter. these guys are so cheap they only use a 4000 watt inverter that will only puts out 5000 watts peak for a very short time before tripping out.
peswiki.com...:GDS-Technologies_5kW_inside_motor-generator_400.jpg
peswiki.com...:GDS_Technologies%27_Portable_Water_Generators.



posted on Oct, 27 2014 @ 09:19 AM
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a reply to: ANNED

It never fails to amuse me how utterly credulous PESwiki is with their "reporting".



posted on Oct, 28 2014 @ 07:01 AM
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originally posted by: ignorant_ape
anyone who uses the term :

"3000 watts per hour "

as an aledged output for a generator is :

a fooking idiot


Can you explain why? As far as I am aware all power generation is expressed in watts/hour, for example megawatt hours (MWh), kilowatt hours (KWh) etc. This would be 3 kilowatt hours. Sounds OK to me.
edit on 28/10/2014 by PuterMan because: speeling eras



posted on Oct, 28 2014 @ 07:06 AM
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a reply to: PuterMan

Generator ratings are typically expressed in starting and running wattage.



posted on Oct, 28 2014 @ 07:13 AM
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a reply to: AugustusMasonicus

Gee, I must have spent 5 years programming power stations in Ireland under an incorrect assumption. Maybe for toy generator perhaps. I can assure you that the output of power stations is measured in megawatt hours, which just to agree with you in some respects, is not the same as the boiler plate rating which is the maximum output of the unit in Megawatts, thus a 300Mw unit may produce a sustained 300 Mw per hour, or less.
edit on 28/10/2014 by PuterMan because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 28 2014 @ 07:15 AM
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a reply to: PuterMan

Instead of being sarcastic maybe you could look up some portable generators and see how they are rated.



posted on Oct, 28 2014 @ 07:23 AM
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a reply to: AugustusMasonicus

correct, although the power of a generator could run certain things.
it has to be able to handle the starting surge. some generator can handle a surge some can't.

example, if you have a electric motor that pulls right at 15 amps full load. the starting amps can be between 5 to 10 times that. depending on your open circuit voltage. another thing you have to consider is how for your run is to the equipment is and the gauge of your wire. smaller gauge less current/ amps/watts.



posted on Oct, 28 2014 @ 07:23 AM
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a reply to: PuterMan

Briggs and Stratton:

Running Watts 6000
Starting Watts 7500

Honda EU2000i:

AC Output 120V 2000W max. (16.7A) 1600W rated (13.3A)

Winco:

8000-9000 watts



Calculating wattage requirements for portable generators:

1) Find the plate or label on each appliance that tells how many watts of electricity it uses. More than likely, it's the same label that tells you the model number and serial number of the product, and is located in some very inconspicuous (and inconvenient) place on the appliance. The label will show either amps or watts.

2) Record (on paper) the "watts" information for each appliance or product for which the generator will be providing power. For those that don't show watts, record the amps.

3) Calculate the watts for appliances or products that show only "Amps" using Watt's Law: Volts x Amps = Watts. You know that the appliance is on a 110 volt circuit; if the label says, "4 Watts" or "4W," multiply 110 (the voltage) by 45: 110 x 45 = 440 watts.

4) Add up the total watts for all appliances and products. This is the number of watts of electricity the portable generator must produce to run. Source

Nothing about a time equation there.



posted on Oct, 28 2014 @ 07:24 AM
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a reply to: AugustusMasonicus

You miss my point. It is not a reason to be suspicious because they refer to the output in watts/per hour which is a perfectly valid way of describing generator output. I have no idea how little generators are rated under 'convention' nor is it of any interest to me. Not saying this generator in the OP is not a scam, but that concern over how the output is described is not a reason to say it is.



posted on Oct, 28 2014 @ 07:24 AM
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a reply to: hounddoghowlie

Agreed and understood. I did not want to get too far into the weeds on requirements. The eHow article I linked is pretty basic but gives anyone a fairly good way to estimate required wattage on a portable or backup generator.



posted on Oct, 28 2014 @ 07:26 AM
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a reply to: PuterMan

I liken it to the scam emails you get where there are misspellings and poor grammar. If you are in the business of selling generators and you do not even use the correct parlance in describing your product's output I automatically think it is a scam.



posted on Oct, 28 2014 @ 07:27 AM
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a reply to: AugustusMasonicus


Nothing about a time equation there


Because they are talking about a single point in time, i.e. the point of maximum load rather than the sustained output of the generator. The plated rate is not always a guide to sustained output.



posted on Oct, 28 2014 @ 07:27 AM
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a reply to: AugustusMasonicus

On that you may have a point



posted on Oct, 28 2014 @ 07:30 AM
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originally posted by: PuterMan


Because they are talking about a single point in time, i.e. the point of maximum load rather than the sustained output of the generator. The plated rate is not always a guide to sustained output.


With a portable or backup generator the maximum or peak load is what is critical so you do not overload the unit.

I think we are both on the same page, just coming from different directions. Either way, I am sure that this is a scam generator.



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