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Breaking: High school shooter active in Washington state, Shots fired.

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posted on Oct, 26 2014 @ 02:46 AM
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According to the NY Daily News, it seems the girl who died is NOT the girlfriend. The girlfriend is Shaylee Chuckulnaskit.



It's not clear if his alleged love interest was the girl he killed or one of the two he critically injured. It's also not clear which of the two cousins could have been dating the girl.

"He shot people he cared about," Jaylen's football teammate Dylen Boomer told the Seattle Times.

On Saturday, all four wounded victims remained in Seattle-area hospitals.

The two girls — Shaylee Chuckulnaskit and Gia Soriano, both 14 — are in intensive care with "very critical" head injuries, officials at Providence Regional Medical Center Everett said.



The 14 year old teen shot two of his own cousins. One of the cousins, Andrew, according to the article, began dating Shaylee, whom he whom shall not be named had just broken up with. This now explains why he went after his family in the cafeteria that day. Still insane, no matter how you shake it. According to the news, from the sounds of it, one of the boys was shot in the jaw.



Nate Hatch is in critical condition while Andrew Fryberg is in serious condition.

The Marysville-Pilchuck football team was supposed to host Oak Harbor High School Friday night for a division title game. The rival team forfeited, volunteering to come in second place to the grieving school, the Everett Herald reported.

"It's not just because it's Marysville. It's the right thing to do,” Oak Harbor head coach Jay Turner, a 1990 graduate of Marysville-Pilchuck, said. “We had a meeting with our kids after school, and then I talked with my coaches and we were all in 100 percent agreement that it was the right thing to do.”

Classes at Marysville-Pilchuck will be cancelled next week, school officials said.


Terribly Sad








posted on Oct, 26 2014 @ 02:40 PM
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a reply to: Anyafaj

Yep, that was the sense I got when looking over this group's tweets. ****** made a remark that "you're not my 'brother' anymore" or something similar and really, one of his cousins seemed the most likely target for that comment. Whole thing reads like drama ville and I really hope parents review those twitters as they are absolutely ridiculous for 14 year old kids.
edit on 26/10/14 by WhiteAlice because: error



posted on Oct, 26 2014 @ 05:43 PM
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originally posted by: WhiteAlice
a reply to: Anyafaj

Yep, that was the sense I got when looking over this group's tweets. ****** made a remark that "you're not my 'brother' anymore" or something similar and really, one of his cousins seemed the most likely target for that comment. Whole thing reads like drama ville and I really hope parents review those twitters as they are absolutely ridiculous for 14 year old kids.



I saw some of those tweets this kid has posted, not all, apparently some were pornographic so I refuse to look at those. But from what I hear, and saw, most recently, were disturbing. The Facebook ones were mild when compared to the Tweets.



posted on Oct, 26 2014 @ 06:44 PM
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If this poster is right, there were MANY active shooter drills in the Seattle* area recently:

www.activistpost.com...
comment by 'a Marysville Mom"
In Snohomish County where this happened, many (if not most) of the high schools are holding lock down drills as required safety measures, in addition to fire drills. It's a fact of life. I have kids at 3 schools, they ALL had the drills (including the elementary schools). Lakewood High School's was on Monday(10-20-14)....

And that training may have extended to hospitals:

www.heraldnet.com...
--“We had dreaded this day in our community, but we were prepared to handle these kids when they came,” said Dr. Joanne Roberts, the chief medical officer at Providence.

www.infowars.com...
comment by 'Internationaly Sazon'
The doctor at hospital where the 2 victims were she reported on CNN that they just received training on these type of events ....

All this manufactured scare mongering at the very time Washington State's mail-in ballots are hitting people's dinner tables:

www.msn.com...
"Friday's carnage was the region's second deadly school shooting in a little over four months, and it happened shortly after Washington state voters began receiving mail-in ballots that ask them to make a choice."

Almost all of Washington state now votes ONLY by mail. How can you NOT see the agenda here?

--------------

*How many drills were going on state-wide?


edit on 26-10-2014 by starviego because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 26 2014 @ 06:57 PM
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originally posted by: Anyafaj

originally posted by: WhiteAlice
a reply to: Anyafaj

Yep, that was the sense I got when looking over this group's tweets. ****** made a remark that "you're not my 'brother' anymore" or something similar and really, one of his cousins seemed the most likely target for that comment. Whole thing reads like drama ville and I really hope parents review those twitters as they are absolutely ridiculous for 14 year old kids.



I saw some of those tweets this kid has posted, not all, apparently some were pornographic so I refuse to look at those. But from what I hear, and saw, most recently, were disturbing. The Facebook ones were mild when compared to the Tweets.


Yep. As an outside observer and as a mother of a middle schooler, I was really downright perturbed by what I saw going on. Told my daughter that if I ever caught her doing those sort of things as a teen online, she'd never be leaving the house again. And I'm a pretty laid back parent, lol. It all reminded me of that old adage--don't play with fire lest you get burned. You had 14 year old girls saying that wanted a quickie with no bites, scratches or hickies on TWITTER for all the world you could see to boot. WTH. Not to mention the violation of "bro code" that I always heard get recited growing up (and this applied to both boys and girls): If your best friend likes a person, you don't turn around and date them because it destroys friendships. Dating somebody for a couple weeks is NOT worth the loss of a good friendship--let alone a family member.

I sure hope that parents actually do take a look at what these kids were doing online. These are things that kids were basically advertising to anyone and everyone. I also can't help but wonder what a lot of those tweets played into it. Tuning out a couple at school is one thing. Having it advertised with pictures and what should be very private conversations is a whole other thing.

Really perturbing and if I could've washed my eyes out with soap, I would've. Really makes me also wonder about kids--particularly girls'--sense of self worth today. In my day, behaving like they were, at least via twitter, would've equated to a pretty nasty reputation.

Off my soapbox now.



posted on Oct, 27 2014 @ 04:24 AM
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a reply to: canucks555

This society breeds psychopaths. What else is there to say?

It seems to me that life makes less sense than death sometimes



posted on Oct, 27 2014 @ 07:41 AM
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a reply to: WhiteAlice

I work in a high school and I can tell you from my own experience this is pretty common behavior among teens.

The things I hear, read, and see in high school...scary.



posted on Oct, 27 2014 @ 07:02 PM
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It seems he texted his victims to meet him in the cafeteria to ensure they'd all be there. He was about to reload when the teacher put her hand on his arm/hand. (I've heard both versions, so I'm not sure which.) If it weren't for the teacher, there would have been more victims.


Also, according to CNN, another victim has passed. The total count now is 3 dead, 3 injured. 2 are his cousins, 3 were friends. Other than mentioning Andrew (one of the victims), it does not mention who the other cousin is, unless another article mentions this.



posted on Oct, 27 2014 @ 07:19 PM
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originally posted by: TorqueyThePig
a reply to: WhiteAlice

I work in a high school and I can tell you from my own experience this is pretty common behavior among teens.

The things I hear, read, and see in high school...scary.


I'm lucky in that my daughter talks about many of the shenanigans that goes on at her school. Whether her own role in the shenanigans is modified to please me or not is an entirely different (and questionable?) matter. However, I took a hard line stance on her not having a presence on the internet after she had a run-in with a probable pedophile a year ago. Ironically enough, she makes no complaint about the ban on the internet or even the lack of cellphone. What she generally says about both is that to have either would both be incredibly stressful as most of her friends' disagreements begin on the internet and that she's realized that her friends' faces being constantly stuffed into cellphones to text each other at the same lunch table is "weird" or "creepy". From what she has told me, nearly all of the drama in school begins on twitter or facebook and explodes the next day at school.

I look at it this way: if adults have difficulty associating a faceless person online as being a human being with feelings, then how the heck are kids, who are still learning social rules, supposed to be capable of it? She's had friends say totally wretched things to each other online only to burst into tearful apologies the next day when confronted. When I was growing up, middle and high school was drama central enough as it was. I cannot even imagine what it's like with social media and cellphones thrown into the mix.

a reply to: Anyafaj

Yep. Another one of the girls died. So heartbreaking.
edit on 27/10/14 by WhiteAlice because: added second reply



posted on Oct, 27 2014 @ 07:44 PM
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The shooter was very popular - homecoming king, football player. Here's some more info:

news.yahoo.com...
edit on 27-10-2014 by StoutBroux because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 28 2014 @ 07:25 AM
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a reply to: WhiteAlice

I agree in the fact that a vast majority of issues begin on social media.

At times I wish it never existed.



posted on Oct, 28 2014 @ 10:23 AM
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originally posted by: TorqueyThePig
a reply to: WhiteAlice

I agree in the fact that a vast majority of issues begin on social media.

At times I wish it never existed.


Same! Thank you, btw, for saying that. One day when I was in the school office, I was asked for her cell phone number. I told the secretary that she didn't have one and I didn't think that kids should be toting cell phones to school. I expected her to show some relief as I can imagine that cellphones cause a whole lot of distraction and trouble the in the school but she just looked at me like I was a total weirdo.

I do think the net is not a good place for kids as they are learning to socialize. If we were to describe the most prevalent behaviors on the net (or perhaps most notable), the internet is basically teaching kids to act like little unfeeling sociopaths when they aren't. All I know is that my youngest was getting pretty rude and was really getting prone to emotional breakdowns while on it. All that stopped within a month of her no longer being on the net. It's one of the reasons why she's okay with it--she's happier. Still, I get a lot of people eying me like I'm doing something wrong and that's frustrating.



posted on Oct, 28 2014 @ 11:34 PM
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originally posted by: WhiteAlice

originally posted by: TorqueyThePig
a reply to: WhiteAlice

I agree in the fact that a vast majority of issues begin on social media.

At times I wish it never existed.


Same! Thank you, btw, for saying that. One day when I was in the school office, I was asked for her cell phone number. I told the secretary that she didn't have one and I didn't think that kids should be toting cell phones to school. I expected her to show some relief as I can imagine that cellphones cause a whole lot of distraction and trouble the in the school but she just looked at me like I was a total weirdo.

I do think the net is not a good place for kids as they are learning to socialize. If we were to describe the most prevalent behaviors on the net (or perhaps most notable), the internet is basically teaching kids to act like little unfeeling sociopaths when they aren't. All I know is that my youngest was getting pretty rude and was really getting prone to emotional breakdowns while on it. All that stopped within a month of her no longer being on the net. It's one of the reasons why she's okay with it--she's happier. Still, I get a lot of people eying me like I'm doing something wrong and that's frustrating.



My daughter is 19, and autistic. I got her a cell phone last month for her birthday. She has been going a little bit overboard with it seeing as it's a new thing. The downside to her autism is she is one of the many who is electronic crazy. I've had her change things on my computer and not know what she did. (Don't worry, I usually have no clue what she did either. LOL I've had her shut off my touch mouse pad and then two years later manage to turn the darn thing back on. LMAO) Her school rule with the phone is it IS allowed in the building, BUT during school hours it MUST stay in the locker, unless it is an emergency, in which case, you have permission to use it in the office only. She got in trouble last week for texting me twice during the week during school hours, when her phone should have been in her locker. I told the school during her IEP on Thursday that if she is caught again, they have permission to take it away until the end of the day.

Apparently her other issue is to go on Facebook in the middle of the night, stay up all night long, then refuse her autism and seizure medication and refuse to go to school. I told her she can't come visit me unless she goes to school. She knows the rules. Since she's coming for a visit Friday, that turned her attitude around. She worked out a deal where her phone charges on her dresser while she sleep, she promises to take her meds, go to school and she'll be able to visit. (Her end goal is to eventually move back in with me.)

After seeing what went down last week in WA, yes, I think about my daughter and her school more. I think her having a cell phone interferes with her in school, but at the same time, if something like this were to happen, I truly don't know if my daughter would know what to do. And that terrifies me even more.




posted on Oct, 29 2014 @ 02:04 AM
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a reply to: Anyafaj

Special needs is a whole other ball game. I'm autistic and my son is as well. While I managed okay without a cell phone (they didn't exist) growing up (and my middle school had bomb threats and pipe bombs being found in it every other month), his flavor of autism is different. Given the same situation, a meltdown and uncertainty as to what to do would definitely happen. He got a cell phone when he started college and it came in handy all those times that he dozed off on the bus, miss his change over and it was the end of the freaking world. I hear you.

How I reigned him in was shutting down his internet access on his pc at a reasonable time through our router and having him hand over his cell at that time to charge it. He liked to snooze in school, too.



posted on Oct, 29 2014 @ 02:40 AM
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I feel so sorry for kids today.High school is a difficult time for young adults even back in my day.Their under many pressures and uncertainties about their futures and social circles,etc.
Today this kids go to school everyday and see security guards and wonder if a classmate may breakout a gun and start opening fire.What kind of environment is that?Sadly one that has created far too many tragic killings like today.
If we don't take a good hard look at the reasons for these tragedies and address them we will be reading about the next one saying the same thing we are today.Why?



posted on Oct, 29 2014 @ 06:25 PM
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originally posted by: WhiteAlice
a reply to: Anyafaj

Special needs is a whole other ball game. I'm autistic and my son is as well. While I managed okay without a cell phone (they didn't exist) growing up (and my middle school had bomb threats and pipe bombs being found in it every other month), his flavor of autism is different. Given the same situation, a meltdown and uncertainty as to what to do would definitely happen. He got a cell phone when he started college and it came in handy all those times that he dozed off on the bus, miss his change over and it was the end of the freaking world. I hear you.

How I reigned him in was shutting down his internet access on his pc at a reasonable time through our router and having him hand over his cell at that time to charge it. He liked to snooze in school, too.


With my daughter, she's 19, going on 8. 12 o a very good day. If something like this were to occur, no amount of drills and training would help I don't think. I know how she is when she panics. She sometimes has a petit mal seizure and wets herself. She woulnd't be able to respond to commands, including RUN!



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