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Thousands of undersea volcanoes revealed in new map of ocean floor. (not vents but volcanoes)

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posted on Oct, 22 2014 @ 01:16 AM
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Remember some of the articles posted about the deep oceans warming; usually blamed on climate change (bahh humbug).. Scientist believe there are over a million hydrothermal vents in the deep ocean and now they are discovering more and more volcanoes... Some extinct (no doubt) but others are probably doing their thing in the deep dark depts. How many heat sources would it take to warm an ocean... that is the question ?


Scientists have created the highest resolution map yet of the ocean floor, revealing thousands of underwater mountains and extinct volcanoes that were previously unknown. .

In a study published Thursday in Science, researchers say the new map is at least twice as accurate as the previous version assembled nearly 20 years ago even though it can only resolve features that are a mile high and bigger.


So this latest discovery only detects possible volcanoes that are over 5280 ft tall.. How many more little heat sources are there ?

Asked whether we would ever be able to see the bottom of the seafloor with resolution as high as those images of Mars, a planet more than 100 million miles away, Sandwell responded: "Not in our lifetimes."

The reason is because of the cost of doing the mapping .
www.latimes.com...

youtu.be...




posted on Oct, 22 2014 @ 01:17 AM
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a reply to: 727Sky




How many heat sources would it take to warm an ocean... that is the question ?

A lot.
But what makes you think that they haven't been there for hundreds of thousands (millions) of years? Because they have been, you know.

edit on 10/22/2014 by Phage because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 22 2014 @ 01:19 AM
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a reply to: 727Sky

Makes you wonder what life could be down there. (Other than fish and stuff we know of)



posted on Oct, 22 2014 @ 01:27 AM
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originally posted by: Phage
a reply to: 727Sky




How many heat sources would it take to warm an ocean... that is the question ?

A lot.
But what makes you think that they haven't been there for hundreds of thousands (millions) of years? Because they have been, you know.


Ahhh Phage glad to see you are around and awake.. Yes, thousands and millions of years the volcanoes might have existed; some new, some old..

When they were/are active, only they know.

2012 was the record for active volcanoes (82) until 2013 which set a new record of 83 land based eruptions. No one is able to see the eruptions under the deep without being there on location..

So... Yes most are probably old, some are probably new... When they are erupting neither of us knows...

Thanks for dropping by.



posted on Oct, 22 2014 @ 01:28 AM
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a reply to: 727Sky


2012 was the record for active volcanoes (82) until 2013 which set a new record of 83 land based eruptions
Your source? Because this one says different.

www.volcano.si.edu...
edit on 10/22/2014 by Phage because: (no reason given)

edit on 10/22/2014 by Phage because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 22 2014 @ 01:37 AM
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a reply to: 727Sky

It's a cool map for sure, but your little twist is silly.

It doesn't say "some extinct", it says "and extinct".


revealing thousands of underwater mountains and extinct volcanoes that were previously unknown.


Sure there are some that are active, but those are the ones we already know about as they are easier to find.

More info in this existing thread.

www.abovetopsecret.com...
edit on 22-10-2014 by Mianeye because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 22 2014 @ 02:12 AM
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a reply to: Phage



This year will go down on record, as seeing the most volcanic eruptions recorded in modern history. The previous number was set in 2010, at 82 volcanic eruptions for the year. The number of volcanoes erupting across the planet has been steadily rising from a meager number of just 55 recorded in 1990. While most scientists may readily dismiss any significance to the latest figures and may be quick to say the planet is just experiencing normal geological activity, it does raise other concerns about just what may be transpiring within the interior of our planet. The average number of volcanic eruptions per year should be about 50 to 60; as of December 5, 2013, we already at 83. Volcanic eruptions are one way the planet dissipates a dangerous build-up of heat, magma, and pressurized gases. The planet’s outer core is thought to flirt with critical temperatures in the range of around 4400 °C (8000 °F). Any rise or major fluctuation in interior gradient could have profound and disruptive effects on processes whose very properties are government by convective heat emanating from the planet’s outer core: magnetic field propagation, tectonic plate movements, sea-floor spreading mechanics, and mantle plume activity. Mantle plumes or hotspots are thought to be the central mechanism which fuels the vast underground chambers of many of the world’s supervolcanoes.

theextinctionprotocol.wordpress.com...



posted on Oct, 22 2014 @ 02:17 AM
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a reply to: Phage

That is a neat sight but after playing with it for abit I could not get the world totals ? Maybe I was not looking at the proper area ?



posted on Oct, 22 2014 @ 02:19 AM
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a reply to: 727Sky
Or maybe you have to like databases and learning how to use them.
I used the database to produce the chart. It's not that hard to do but it is a bit on the nerdy side.

The extinction protocol? That's your source? Seriously? They give you a number and you just accept it? Why? Don't you even wonder for a minute where they come up with it? They don't say, do they?
edit on 10/22/2014 by Phage because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 22 2014 @ 02:30 AM
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a reply to: 727Sky

This mapping isn't reliable ...

It bases it's data on variations in gravity, but in this there are in fact ... to great a margin of error. And more to the point, a lot of "gravity" variations are due to volcanic activity, where magma underneath, alters perceived gravity ... due to the magma's electromagnetic features, as well as it's enormous compressed state.

Mapping the oceans by "ship" is preferred ... until you find a way to "sonar" from space, this data is "grossly" inaccurate.



posted on Oct, 22 2014 @ 02:51 AM
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originally posted by: bjarneorn
a reply to: 727Sky

This mapping isn't reliable ...

It bases it's data on variations in gravity, but in this there are in fact ... to great a margin of error. And more to the point, a lot of "gravity" variations are due to volcanic activity, where magma underneath, alters perceived gravity ... due to the magma's electromagnetic features, as well as it's enormous compressed state.

Mapping the oceans by "ship" is preferred ... until you find a way to "sonar" from space, this data is "grossly" inaccurate.


Thus as the linked article stated we have better maps of Mars and the Moon than we do of the bottom of the Oceans. The cost for ten ships doing the mapping for ten years (how long they guess it would take) is to high

Since Phage is not happy with the linked article about how many volcanoes were erupting in 2010 and 2013.... by typing in "Volcano Statistics by year" yahoo brings up several pages of graphs for all to see.. Funny how the total eruptions are not all that easy to find for a given year... at least for me... I think the graphs will back up the linked article by years however, I have found most graphs are more interested in the amount of particulate matter and gasses the eruptions have blown into the atmosphere than just how many actual eruptions there were..


edit on 22-10-2014 by 727Sky because: ....



posted on Oct, 22 2014 @ 06:57 AM
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a reply to: Phage

Humm, there are studies that indicate that CLIMATE CHANGE, yes CLIMATE CHANGE during deglaciation has caused in the past increased volcanic activity. Should I remind you that Earth has been experiencing warming since the 1600s?..


Title: Feedback Between Deglaciation, Volcanism, and Atmospheric CO2
Author: Huybers, Peter John; Langmuir, Charles H.
Note: Order does not necessarily reflect citation order of authors.

Citation: Huybers, Peter J., and Charles Langmuir. 2009. Feedback between deglaciation, volcanism, and atmospheric CO2. Earth and Planetary Science Letters 286(3-4): 479-491.


Full Text & Related Files: Huybers_FeedbackDeglaciation.pdf (904.4Kb; PDF) application/pdf

Abstract: An evaluation of the historical record of volcanic eruptions shows that subaerial volcanism increases globally by two to six times above background levels between 12 ka and 7 ka, during the last deglaciation. Increased volcanism occurs in deglaciating regions. Causal mechanisms could include an increase in magma production owing to the mantle decompression caused by ablation of glaciers and ice caps or a more general pacing of when eruptions occur by the glacial variability. A corollary is that ocean ridge volcanic production should decrease with the rising sea level during deglaciation, with the greatest effect at slow spreading ridges. CO2 output from the increased subaerial volcanism appears large enough to influence glacial/interglacial CO2 variations. We estimate subaerial emissions during deglaciation to be between 1000 and 5000 Gt of CO2 above the long term average background flux, assuming that emissions are proportional to the frequency of eruptions. After accounting for equilibration with the ocean, this additional CO2 flux is consistent in timing and magnitude with ice core observations of a 40 ppm increase in atmospheric CO2 concentration during the second half of the last deglaciation. Estimated decreases in CO2 output from ocean ridge volcanoes compensate for only 20% of the increased subaerial flux. If such a large volcanic output of CO2 occurs, then volcanism forges a positive feedback between glacial variability and atmospheric CO2 concentrations: deglaciation increases volcanic eruptions, raises atmospheric CO2, and causes more deglaciation. Such a positive feedback may contribute to the rapid passage from glacial to interglacial periods. Conversely, waning volcanic activity during an interglacial could lead to a reduction in CO2 and the onset of an ice age. Whereas glacial/interglacial variations in CO2 are generally attributed to oceanic mechanisms, it is suggested that the vast carbon reservoirs associated with the solid Earth may also play an important role.
Published Version: dx.doi.org...
Other Sources: www.people.fas.harvard.edu...
Terms of Use: This article is made available under the terms and conditions applicable to Other Posted Material, as set forth at nrs.harvard.edu...:HUL.InstRepos:dash.current.terms-of-use#LAA
Citable link to this page: nrs.harvard.edu...:HUL.InstRepos:3659701
...

dash.harvard.edu...

Ooops, nvm about the bolded part which specifies that such increase volcanism in the past can account for an increase in CO2 emissions of 40ppm... That is a subject for another topic... However, what is relevant to this discussion is the findings that deglaciation periods in the past seem to be a causal mechanism for increased volcanism... And guess what?... Should I remind you again that Earth has been experiencing "warming", aka Climate Change in the form of warming since the 1600s?...

Anyways, there is also this...


Earth's spin and volcanic eruptions: evidence for mutual cause-and-effect interactions?

Danilo M. Palladino1 and
Gianluca Sottili2,*

Article first published online: 17 OCT 2013

DOI: 10.1111/ter.12073

© 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd

Abstract


The angular velocity of Earth's rotation shows decadal oscillations due to the lunisolar gravitational torque, as well as inter- or intra-annual changes arising from the angular momentum exchange between the atmosphere and the solid Earth. The energies involved in the Length of Day (LOD) variations may affect the crustal deformation rate and seismic energy release on a global scale. We found significant correlation between the occurrences of major volcanic eruptions and the LOD pattern since AD 1750. On a multiyear scale, eruption frequency worldwide increases with LOD changes. Moreover, the injection of sulphur gases into the atmosphere during major eruptions is accompanied by significant inter-annual LOD variations. This provides evidence of complex mutual cause-and-effect interactions: stress changes induced by multiyear variations in Earth's spin may affect climactic volcanic activity; also, the atmosphere's dynamic response to volcanic plumes may result in global changes of wind circulation and climate, with consequent LOD variations.
...

onlinelibrary.wiley.com...

"Changes in angular velocity of Earth's rotation may affect crustal deformation and seismic activity".

Another fact that has been happening to Earth since at least about 1840 is that it's magnetic field has been weakening, and there has been an exponential increase in the weakening of Earth's magnetic field. This would suggest that there are changes occurring in the Earth's core that would logically tell us there has also been an increase in seismic and volcanic activity. Apart from the observations which tells us there is such an increase activity despite the claims by some.

It has been recently reported that there has been another increase in the weakening of Earth's magnetic field which subsequently also caused magnetic north to move faster than it was in previous decades. Since the changes in Earth's magnetic field implies that the Earth's core is undergoing dramatic changes, logic would dictate that these changes will also include an increase in volcanic and seismic activity. Which despite the "claims by some" has indeed increased...

Earth's Magnetic Field Is Weakening 10 Times Faster Now


edit on 22-10-2014 by ElectricUniverse because: add link and comments



posted on Oct, 22 2014 @ 08:42 AM
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a reply to: 727Sky

Oohhh, Phage and ElectricUniverse back and forth...let me get some popcorn.



posted on Oct, 22 2014 @ 09:33 AM
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originally posted by: 727Sky


Ahhh Phage glad to see you are around and awake.. Yes, thousands and millions of years the volcanoes might have existed; some new, some old..

When they were/are active, only they know.

So... Yes most are probably old, some are probably new... When they are erupting neither of us knows...


That's not entirely true. You may not be able to see the actual eruption but you can see it's effects. Rather than sending out a huge plume of ash and chemicals it produces a plume of clouds. All of the material ejected from the volcano is absorbed into the water, but the heat still rises. That means steam, which turns into clouds, which then falls as precipitation. This one, for example, dumped snow on the east coast US for over a week:

pic 1

pic 2

pic 3



posted on Oct, 22 2014 @ 11:00 PM
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originally posted by: QuietSpeech
a reply to: 727Sky

Oohhh, Phage and ElectricUniverse back and forth...let me get some popcorn.


lol, that made me laugh. Yeah, some of us are very hard-headed in our opinions and views. I guess we can all agree to disagree on some topics at least.



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