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Transplanted Organs Hold Memories of Donor. Do You Know Someone?

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posted on Oct, 10 2014 @ 07:39 AM
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there have been several scifi/ horror movies that use this as part of the plot.
some as back as 30years or more. i was wondering if this might have been something people have been seeing that long and science has just caught up, or if it's something new.

i wish i could remember the names of them, i'm not into the horror films anymore. i do remember one was about a serial killer that donated a lot of body parts after his execution and people started killing folks.




posted on Oct, 10 2014 @ 08:08 AM
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a reply to: sled735

I'm going to suggest that an emerging contextual entanglement (basically, a profound association) between the minds of donor and recipient is a lot more likely here than the DNA structure somehow evolving into a sapient information processing system as a result of a transplant operation.

The fact that this happens sporadically is solid evidence that the transplanted tissue isn't what's directly affecting the conscious minds of these recipients. I realize that scientific minded folks have a serious issue with the belief in a conscious afterlife, but to insist that a transplanted organ can become a secondary conscious human brain - with its own memories and intellectual agenda - seems like a frantic effort to think of anything at all (regardless of how absurd) that can prevent a serious examination of the possible survivability of the human mind upon the death of the brain.

At some point, we're going to have to surrender our devotion to materialism and start becoming more open to the fact that particles aren't capable of thinking or building things that think - not on their own anyway. This isn't a plug for a god or a supreme consciousness of any kind. This is just an acknowledgement that a kidney or a heart or a liver or a pair of corneas has no ability to become a secondary brain. Whatever is true about these reports is an indication of something else entirely, even if the transplant itself remains the catalyst.
edit on 10/10/2014 by NorEaster because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 10 2014 @ 08:14 AM
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a reply to: NorEaster

I must say that's well said, written and probably quite true. Cellular memory would sort of mean, in effect, that the cells had developed more than surely is possible. So if you're surrendering your devotion to materialism with this, could you explain more fully your conceptualization of what, exactly, and how this supposed entanglement comes about and would work?
regards, despite and because of that forbidding look in your avatar,
tetra



posted on Oct, 10 2014 @ 08:18 AM
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a reply to: sled735

This really changes my perspective on things.



posted on Oct, 10 2014 @ 10:27 AM
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a reply to: NorEaster

Bravo, I was trying to figure out how to word the thoughts you just shared.

Alternately, I read a comment on ATS that suggested that our thoughts, personality was colored by being in a physical body. Take the life-force or whatever you want to call it, and transplant it to another body and it wouldn't have the same personality or ideas. Perhaps that could be applied to people and the cravings, it still falls short on convicting a prior murder though.



posted on Oct, 10 2014 @ 10:44 AM
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originally posted by: QuietSpeech
a reply to: NorEaster

Bravo, I was trying to figure out how to word the thoughts you just shared.

Alternately, I read a comment on ATS that suggested that our thoughts, personality was colored by being in a physical body. Take the life-force or whatever you want to call it, and transplant it to another body and it wouldn't have the same personality or ideas. Perhaps that could be applied to people and the cravings, it still falls short on convicting a prior murder though.


Just had a weird thought.

Perhaps the "consciousness" "life source" "soul" of the murdered little girl could hold on to the donated organ. She may have clung to this little part of her body in order to pass on the information about who killed her.

Does the story say anything about the memories ending after the murderer was convicted and justice done?



posted on Oct, 10 2014 @ 10:59 AM
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originally posted by: stellawayten
Cool thread. So I wonder about people with multiple personalities. Could it be the dna from a past relative? What if hat person had some disorder where they could never merge all of the different memories. Idk, just a thought.


I was thinking the same thing as I was reading through this. And it could go back through several generations and literally many many people. If you think about it, it could be hundreds. I also think Science Fiction got it right with their stories of limb transplants as well, carry the traits of the donor. This is completely amazing information. I wish I could get a pinky transplant from Tesla, a thumb implant from Einstein.

ETA: So wait, if you got a blood transfusion would the same thing apply? Hmmmmmmmmm
edit on 10-10-2014 by StoutBroux because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 10 2014 @ 11:02 AM
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My husband had back surgery 14 years ago or so. He had donor bone from a dead person put in his back. There was no change to his personality or his traits. I would think that bone counts in this discussion. Just FYI for anyone interested ...



posted on Oct, 10 2014 @ 11:26 AM
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originally posted by: FlyersFan
My husband had back surgery 14 years ago or so. He had donor bone from a dead person put in his back. There was no change to his personality or his traits. I would think that bone counts in this discussion. Just FYI for anyone interested ...


Well they're not saying it happens to everyone. So for whatever reason, the donor information or the recipient may be incompatible in a sort of way?????? I don't know, just like some therapies work for some people but not others. We don't all necessarily have the same reaction to the same procedures and this might be one of them.
edit on 10-10-2014 by StoutBroux because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 10 2014 @ 02:17 PM
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originally posted by: FlyersFan
My husband had back surgery 14 years ago or so. He had donor bone from a dead person put in his back. There was no change to his personality or his traits. I would think that bone counts in this discussion. Just FYI for anyone interested ...


Does bone heave blood running thru it? I don't think bone would count because it isn't an organ. It isn't made up of tissue.



posted on Oct, 10 2014 @ 02:18 PM
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You know, this really makes me rethink bring an organ donor. I don't want to be trapped in someone else's body.



posted on Oct, 10 2014 @ 02:26 PM
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a reply to: sled735

Interesting topic, per usual!

I've wondered about memories being attached to tissues, organs and even blood.

A few years ago I had a total hip replacement and required 3 blood transfusions after the surgery. Two of the blood transfusions I received was my own blood, one transfusion was from a donor. After receiving the first two transfusions of my own blood, everything felt normal. Then I received the donor blood transfusion and some bizarre things followed.

I had the most vivid dreams that I've ever had before, it felt so real and was the longest dream I've had in sequence. It didn't jump from scene to scene as per usual with dreams, it had a flow that felt like day to day life. I can recall thinking a lot about doughnuts in the dream, I don't eat doughnut because I have Celiac, so the doughnut thing was really out of left field. I recall wondering if the blood donor had eaten a doughnut on the day they donated, lol.

I could also taste the blood inside my body and feel it, for about the first day. It was the oddest sensation and I have no way of describing how I could taste the blood in my veins, but I could. It was just bizarre.
edit on 10-10-2014 by Jennyfrenzy because: eta



posted on Oct, 10 2014 @ 02:30 PM
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originally posted by: stellawayten
You know, this really makes me rethink bring an organ donor. I don't want to be trapped in someone else's body.
you wouldn't be trapped but your memories would still be remembered. Like if someone had a video of you.



posted on Oct, 10 2014 @ 02:37 PM
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a reply to: stellawayten

Most red and white blood cells are made inside of bone and bone is kept alive through blood. So while there isn't exactly blood in your bones, blood is necessary to keep bone alive.


You know, this really makes me rethink bring an organ donor. I don't want to be trapped in someone else's body.


You won't be trapped inside someone's body if you donate organs or tissue. Think of it like a picture hanging on the wall, the people in the picture aren't trapped inside of the image, it's just a moment captured in time.



posted on Oct, 10 2014 @ 02:44 PM
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In my medical student years I was interested in this subject of memory being stored in the blood.
I was convinced that an enzyme related to reverse transcriptase, and that telomeres were involved.
I wanted to test this with lab rats, a set of whom are taught to escape a maze, have their blood drawn, and injected into naïve rats, to see if the latter would have better success in escaping.
My idea was shot down as fringe, and I've been disciplined to never think outside the box - to only accept what Big Pharma science has to say.
I still do not believe the brain is the sole container of all memory, though I am certain it is the sole processor of it.
Without a lab of my own or funding or board approval, my idea will be buried with me.
I don't know, I haven't thought of this in over a decade. It is good to see research on this subject being made though - I'm just jealous I'm not involved!



posted on Oct, 10 2014 @ 03:34 PM
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Thank you for all the comments and feedback with your thoughts.


If anyone is questioning how anything besides the brain can store memory, you should watch the second half of the You Tube video. Two different doctors/researchers explain very clearly how this happens, and show the evidence in the body.

Thank you to the members who have told their experiences after receiving implants.
The blood transfusion was interesting. I was only thinking along the lines of tissue organs, but I'm not a doctor, so I don't know how all this stuff works.


Anyone else out there know anyone who has experienced different behaviors/personalities/cravings after receiving a donated organ?



posted on Oct, 10 2014 @ 03:34 PM
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Double post.

edit on 10/10/2014 by sled735 because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 10 2014 @ 03:38 PM
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a reply to: alexball

You should find all you can on this subject and take it back to those "instructors/teachers" and rub it in their face.


It is people who think outside the box that cause us to progress as a human race. Look at Tesla, Eisenstein, Newton, and anyone else who thought "differently" than the mainstream in order to bring us to where we are today. Where would we be now without them coming forward?


edit on 10/10/2014 by sled735 because: add comment



posted on Oct, 10 2014 @ 04:54 PM
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This is kind of on topic. If you eat peanuts then give blood, that blood can create a peanut reaction in the next person. I know this isn't a memory, but something like this could explain some of the blood issues



www.huliq.com...



posted on Oct, 10 2014 @ 07:05 PM
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originally posted by: boncho
I don't know how well this has been documented scientifically, but I remember one study which was trying to identify that we pass information down with our genes that had some kind of individualized history structured into the DNA. Meaning that throughout our life, our choices and the outcomes programmed and changed our DNA differently, so much to suggest that future generations were tied to that memory.

Wether or not that is related, and whether or not this phenomena is simply not coincidence or some kind of manifested power of the sub conscious I'm not sure. I haven't looked into it enough to say either way. But it's interesting if we could leave behind more than simple memories with our biology, and it says a lot for passing on our genetic code. Having kids seems to truly give someone some sense of immortality.

Should it be the case.


This is how birds know how and where to fly for winter.




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