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Language which came first names or numbers?

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posted on Aug, 6 2014 @ 09:09 PM
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Look into the past when the first words were created. What was first "You Jane me Tarzon" or "We were 1 hand (5) now 1 hand and 1 finger (6)?
The first needs might have been one of these choices.
What are your thoughts and what two words were created first?




posted on Aug, 6 2014 @ 09:33 PM
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a reply to: datasdream

First two words? How about yes and no? Or more universally, mmm and uh uh.



posted on Aug, 7 2014 @ 04:28 AM
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a reply to: datasdream

The first two words were 'mama' and 'dada' (or 'papa').

These are universal attempts by infants to talk; they don't 'mean' anything, the baby is just exercising the mouth and vocal cords.

But adults first hearing it fancifully imagine the child is addressing them with titles.

So we have 'mama', 'mam', 'mum', 'mom', for mother, 'dada', 'dad', 'papa', 'pops', 'pa', for father, 'nana', 'nan', 'nanny', for grandmother or mother substitute, 'baba', 'babe', 'baby', for the child itself.

I believe the first attempts by humans to impute meanings to vocalisations came about this way.



posted on Aug, 7 2014 @ 05:24 AM
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a reply to: datasdream
Numbers are a more abstract concept than names, and would have come later.
You can "name" something by pointing at it and making a sound.
Words for numbers are not necessary until you start to report things which are not visible; "Deer in that valley- not just one, but more than one."



posted on Aug, 7 2014 @ 02:32 PM
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That's a difficult one to really deduce to a logical order.
I suppose that with my excellent memory and recollection abilities, re-experiencing my early development leads me to believe that in an evolutionary sense that syntax was first used for emotive communication such as wanting your "ma" or "da". Of course though I remember saying my first words out of a desire to communicate like my parents in a monkey-see-monkey-do fashion. So, really, based on personal experience it's really hard to say.

If you think in an evolutionary sense when primitive humans were still animals exploring vast plains in groups it may have dawned on them in an internal sense as a recognition mechanism that "hey i'm with these several other apes so everyone is accounted for." Being that emotional bonding is a mammalian trait, if say, one of the apes were missing, it might have, before spoken language had developed, been possible that the worried apes who know there are one less of them now could have conceivably developed the memory required to know the number of apes, if not in a sequencial method (1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6) it would have been in a pattern or a geometric memory system. Such as there were 7 apes before, one out front and three rows of two. The shape of our group has changed, therefore danger, something ate our monkey friend.

Being that this is hard to put into words maybe this doesn't make sense to you and perhaps I will come back another day to clarify this messy evolutionary musing.




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