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Air Algerie plane shot down to curb Ebola outbreak?

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posted on Jul, 30 2014 @ 03:47 PM
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a reply to: Zaphod58

bodily fluids includes sweating more,, what the temp there today??

think,, for the lov of God.!

the temprature makes everyone sweat.

or sweet,,,

if your the virus.sweet.

mankind not so much.




posted on Jul, 30 2014 @ 03:49 PM
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a reply to: BobAthome

Except that viruses don't live for long outside the body. And I generally don't go up to strangers, touch their sweaty body, and then put my hand in my mouth, or rub my eyes, or anything like that.



posted on Jul, 30 2014 @ 04:00 PM
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originally posted by: Zaphod58
a reply to: soficrow

And what part of "Africa is the perfect environment for Ebola" is not registering? It has a serious lack of healthcare, it's hot and dry so if the virus is airborne it can live longer, the people are generally malnourished in a lot of areas, so they don't have good immune systems to help fight it off, etc.

Ebola will never race around the planet like the Spanish Flu did, or like Smallpox could. But in Africa it has found the perfect environment.


So you're saying that wiping out West Africa's population is not a "real" epidemic threat? That only world-wide pandemics are worthy of anyone's attention?

FYI:

1. Ebola flourishes in the jungle - it's hot and wet (not dry), and "lives" for a good while without a host in those conditions. However, as viruses are not alive, just as prions are not alive, so like prions, they don't really die - and probably are sequestered in the soil until deforestation for economic development at which point allhellbreaksloose.

2. As far as "healthcare" goes, there's no treatment, vaccine or anything and the proven best way to stop Ebola outbreaks is to close the hospitals.

3. If you're thinking hospitals in the US and other developed nations have a better track record containing contagion you might want to consider the number of "hospital-acquired" infections that have been created accidentally in hospitals to become "community-acquired" nightmares. For starters.

4. Environments change and so do viruses, microbes and fungi - as we speak, many "tropical" viruses are moving into North America. You may recall one of the first - West Nile? Now we have more. Who's to say Ebola can't adapt to our climate? ...and not that much is known about the little bugger anyway except that it only has about 9 genes and a pretty awesome transformer protein cum prion.

5. The bushmeat trade is international and worth billions - can you imagine paying $10,000 a plate for the gastronomic privilege of getting infected with Ebola? lol



posted on Jul, 30 2014 @ 04:06 PM
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a reply to: soficrow

Show me where I even hinted at that? Prior to now most Ebola outbreaks have been on a fairly low scale, and not really that common, and I doubt that this one will even come close to "wiping out West Africa's population".

I'm talking about health care that keeps people healthy and gives the a good immune system. I'm more than aware of what it would take to fight an Ebola outbreak, and that closing EVERYTHING down is the best way to do it. But if you don't have access to health care that helps you to fight off illnesses and build your immune system, to where it might even have a chance at fighting off something like Ebola, with or without help to do it, then it's going to be much worse. People that have stronger immune systems have a better shot at fighting the virus off, than people that have weaker or compromised immune systems.



posted on Jul, 30 2014 @ 04:10 PM
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originally posted by: Zaphod58
a reply to: soficrow

Show me where I even hinted at that? Prior to now most Ebola outbreaks have been on a fairly low scale, and not really that common, and I doubt that this one will even come close to "wiping out West Africa's population".

I'm talking about health care that keeps people healthy and gives the a good immune system. I'm more than aware of what it would take to fight an Ebola outbreak, and that closing EVERYTHING down is the best way to do it. But if you don't have access to health care that helps you to fight off illnesses and build your immune system, to where it might even have a chance at fighting off something like Ebola, with or without help to do it, then it's going to be much worse. People that have stronger immune systems have a better shot at fighting the virus off, than people that have weaker or compromised immune systems.



do u not think the DOCTORS,,the dead doctors would have not known about this amazing insight??


the two dead doctors ,,and how many nurses?? dead Dr.s and Nurse's,, does not bode well.


edit on 7/30/2014 by BobAthome because: entetainment value.



posted on Jul, 30 2014 @ 04:12 PM
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a reply to: BobAthome

I also said that it improves chances, not that it guarantees anything. It's still a nasty little virus, but it's not going to go sweeping around the world or depopulate an entire continent, or do what other epidemics have done.



posted on Jul, 30 2014 @ 04:22 PM
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originally posted by: Zaphod58
a reply to: soficrow

Show me where I even hinted at that?


On page 1. You said,"Ebola kills too fast for it to be a real threat of an epidemic."



Prior to now most Ebola outbreaks have been on a fairly low scale, and not really that common, and I doubt that this one will even come close to "wiping out West Africa's population".


This epidemic is very different than past Ebola outbreaks, and has been from the getgo - in terms of presenting symptoms, the numerous epicenters, the geographic spread... Much of the very little previously learned about Ebola does not apply here and now.


.....People that have stronger immune systems have a better shot at fighting the virus off, than people that have weaker or compromised immune systems.


More likely Africans have been exposed to Ebola before and consequently have some natural immunity and better defences than others.

Also, looking at health and healthcare, peoples' health has been deteriorating dramatically in the past few decades, notably in developed nations like the USA and despite "superior" healthcare.



posted on Jul, 30 2014 @ 04:32 PM
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a reply to: soficrow

And that means that I think that wiping out the Western Africa population is ok? That's quite a stretch.

But whatever, the premise of this thread is just wrong on every level, as has been proven. Ebola won't depopulate the continent, and won't be a worldwide epidemic, and I'm willing to bet on that.



posted on Jul, 30 2014 @ 08:02 PM
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a reply to: Zaphod58

...Ebola won't depopulate the continent


I said if the epidemic results from corporate bio-terrorism by global mining interests, the goal was to depopulate West Africa (not the entire African continent). I do think this could very well be bioterrorism, and like so many similar acts, could go out of control and have larger unintended effects. I certainly hope that it will not result in a worldwide pandemic, never said it would, and also think it unlikely. However, it WILL have -and already has had- global effects. The most obvious are economic.

ETA:

I agree with the OP that it is possible the plane could have crashed because of Ebola - who knows, maybe the pilot hit the wall. 'Course I also think it possible that a certain space flight was destroyed en route because a virulent bug "appeared out of nowhere."









edit on 30/7/14 by soficrow because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 1 2014 @ 07:22 PM
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a reply to: miles1993

I think it may be highly likely that the plane was brought down for the greater good. Who knows maybe the bad guys are also tasked with being the good guys once in a while..

OG





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