It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

Ask any question you want about Physics

page: 242
74
<< 239  240  241    243  244  245 >>

log in

join
share:

posted on Jan, 12 2016 @ 03:02 PM
link   
a reply to: Arbitrageur

Does dark matter have measurable mass or energy?




posted on Jan, 12 2016 @ 03:12 PM
link   

originally posted by: Phage
a reply to: dashen
Warm apple pie.


If something makes up most of the universe I would imagine it would taste like chicken.
Everything taste like chicken.



posted on Jan, 12 2016 @ 03:41 PM
link   

originally posted by: dashen
a reply to: Arbitrageur

Does dark matter have measurable mass or energy?
Depends on how you define "measurable". The mass of dark matter is deduced from observation so in that sense it's "measured" but it's not a precise measurement because there are some unknowns. The popular theory calls it "cold dark matter" where the "cold" implies it has less energy than something "hot", but I can't say much about its energy other than that.


originally posted by: dashen
If something makes up most of the universe I would imagine it would taste like chicken.
Everything taste like chicken.
This would suggest that Jessica Simpson would agree with you, but I'm not sure if everyone else does:



edit on 2016112 by Arbitrageur because: clarification



posted on Jan, 12 2016 @ 03:48 PM
link   
a reply to: Arbitrageur

Question if we don't know what dark matter is or even if it exists (since it's a place holder until we figure out why we can't figure out 95 percent of the universes energy and mass or where its coming from) how are we detecting it? Aren't we just detecting and putting metrics on the fact that there is a discrepancy in our theories as to what mass and energy actually are and where they come from? Couldn't dark matter really be anything or even a side effect of the matter and energy already detected. Maybe those same particles have more going on that we can't detect or realize. And once we do figure it out it will all add up?



posted on Jan, 12 2016 @ 04:04 PM
link   
a reply to: Arbitrageur

Is dark matter quantified in any sort of way? Do they postulate that it is made of particles or waves or Play-doh?
The idea that everything taste like chicken is actually from the matrix.
Or chicken.
I forget



posted on Jan, 12 2016 @ 04:20 PM
link   

originally posted by: BASSPLYR
how are we detecting it?
Via things like galaxy rotation curves and gravitational lensing as discussed earlier in this thread.


Couldn't dark matter really be anything
Since we live on baryonic dark matter (Earth) I was interested to see if dark matter might be just more stuff like Earth, what astronomers call massive compact halo objects or MACHOs, but gravitational microlensing experiments seem to rule out MACHOs explaining all the dark matter, though they certainly account for some fraction of it. Modified gravity theories have attempted to try to explain observations but they fail on things like the bullet cluster etc. It doesn't seem to interact electromagnetically. So while we don't know what it is, we do know some things about it and some things it isn't.


originally posted by: dashen
a reply to: Arbitrageur

Is dark matter quantified in any sort of way? Do they postulate that it is made of particles
That's the hypothesis that Eros and his team are trying to test I believe. There are others.

edit on 2016112 by Arbitrageur because: clarification



posted on Jan, 12 2016 @ 05:42 PM
link   
what gives protons a negative charge?



posted on Jan, 12 2016 @ 06:28 PM
link   
If a neutrino is neutral and has no charge then why does Neutron Decay into a proton and eject a anti neutrino? Why even call it an anti neutrino? Neutrinos are left handed and anti neutrinos are right hand? Why not just call a neutrino a L-Neutrino and a Anti neutrino a R-Neutrino? Why because an electron gets ejected during beta decay does it shoot out a anti neutrino just to keep things balanced? Wouldn't it rather want to spit out a positron instead?



posted on Jan, 12 2016 @ 07:36 PM
link   

originally posted by: BASSPLYR
what gives protons a negative charge?
That's like asking "What gives the Earth's north magnetic pole a north magnetic pole?"

The answer to both questions is:

It doesn't have that.



posted on Jan, 12 2016 @ 07:47 PM
link   

originally posted by: BASSPLYR
If a neutrino is neutral and has no charge then why does Neutron Decay into a proton and eject a anti neutrino?


Because the total energy state of the final particles is less than the original particle, and there is an allowed interaction by the weak force which could make it happen.


Why even call it an anti neutrino?


It's an anti-neutrino to conserve lepton number. The electron is emitted, and an anti-neutrino to conserve lepton number.

An electron neutrino has the same lepton number as an electron so you need an anti to balance.


Why not just call a neutrino a L-Neutrino and a Anti neutrino a R-Neutrino?


Because anti-neutrino fits the usual pattern of flipping quantum numbers. L and R might imply something about spin or parity only.


Why because an electron gets ejected during beta decay does it shoot out a anti neutrino just to keep things balanced? Wouldn't it rather want to spit out a positron instead?


Occasionally beta decay can emit a positron. It depends on the energy states of the nuclei---is the one with higher or lower charge more or less energetically favorable.

edit on 12-1-2016 by mbkennel because: (no reason given)

edit on 12-1-2016 by mbkennel because: (no reason given)

edit on 12-1-2016 by mbkennel because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 12 2016 @ 07:52 PM
link   

originally posted by: Arbitrageur

originally posted by: BASSPLYR
what gives protons a negative charge?
That's like asking "What gives the Earth's north magnetic pole a north magnetic pole?"

The answer to both questions is:

It doesn't have that.


doh! meant positive charge. what gives a proton a positive charge?



posted on Jan, 12 2016 @ 07:54 PM
link   
a reply to: mbkennel

what are the differences between a neutrino and anti neutrino. same lack of charge. one goes left the other right. but what other things?
edit on 12-1-2016 by BASSPLYR because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 12 2016 @ 08:01 PM
link   

originally posted by: BASSPLYR
doh! meant positive charge. what gives a proton a positive charge?
The quarks inside with fractional charges. One of those is negatively charged, but the other two are positively charged so they win. In the neutron the positive and negative quark charges cancel each other out.



posted on Jan, 12 2016 @ 09:04 PM
link   
a reply to: Arbitrageur

yeah but what's giving it a quark its positive charge? or negative?



posted on Jan, 12 2016 @ 09:05 PM
link   
a reply to: BASSPLYR
God.
Obviously.



posted on Jan, 12 2016 @ 09:44 PM
link   
a reply to: Phage

yeah but God don't play dice. what's the underlying principle behind why there's a up or down spin.



posted on Jan, 12 2016 @ 09:47 PM
link   

originally posted by: Phage
a reply to: BASSPLYR
God.
Obviously.


So...quarks were neutral until God came along?



posted on Jan, 12 2016 @ 09:48 PM
link   
a reply to: Soylent Green Is People
yes.


Wait. What?



posted on Jan, 12 2016 @ 09:51 PM
link   

originally posted by: Phage

Wait. What?


Exactly.



posted on Jan, 12 2016 @ 10:33 PM
link   

originally posted by: BASSPLYR
a reply to: Phage

yeah but God don't play dice.
Opinions vary:

God Does Play Dice



new topics

top topics



 
74
<< 239  240  241    243  244  245 >>

log in

join