It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

Comparing basic Food and Staple Prices from around the World (Part 2)

page: 3
18
<< 1  2    4 >>

log in

join
share:

posted on Apr, 29 2014 @ 10:17 AM
link   

originally posted by: bellagirl
i love this thread. its a bit too late at night to do the food and staples but i will try to list the australian prices soon.

on a similar thing....we have been seeing stories lately of just how much is added on to international goods sold here in australia compared to other countries. in many cases we are paying double here. my son recently bought an iphone and i have been told that we pay a lot more here.

iphone 5s - 16GB - $869.00 this is the price from the australian
apple store.

my question is...how much are people paying for this in other countries.

something like this would be easy to compare the difference. please list the price for the exact same product from an apple store only. please state the country you are from.



Thanks for your input and we are looking forward to your return. can't help you on the Iphone but I am sure others will.

Regards, Iwinder




posted on Apr, 29 2014 @ 10:20 AM
link   

originally posted by: rnaa
I have several comments to make here.

1. Prices are going to be variable by locality and you seem to have an interest in comparing, yet I don't see a reference to your locality where your prices are obtained. Is it there somewhere, and I am just too blind to see?
2. Your 'trouble' with the package size would be solved by calculating the price per unit (gram, milliliter, piece, etc).
3. Calculating the percentage change of the per unit price would expose the changes more clearly.
4. Comparisons across countries would be aided by using an average price across multiple popular brands in the local market, not one particular brand that may not exist in another country.
5. Different countries actually need to have different baskets of goods. Israel, for example, is unlikely to have much bacon in the average consumers grocery basket.
6. Different basket items should be weighted as to their importance. For example, does the price of eggs affect the consumer basket more than the price of peanut butter or toilet paper?
7. Without some of this rigor, your 'study' is just an anecdote.
7. Much of this work is actually done for you by the World Bank's calculation of the CPI for each country. See: Inflation, consumer prices (annual %)


Great post and many thanks for all your valid suggestions, however the thread is posted and it is part 2 of an already existing thread so not much I can do now.

We also kept it simple because how many posters are going to bring home their groceries and then spend a couple of hours doing the math conversions and then posting?

Many thanks for your post.
Regards, Iwinder



posted on Apr, 29 2014 @ 10:23 AM
link   

originally posted by: Neopan100
Just went shopping 2 days ago.
Southern Illinois USA

Green onions (small bundle) 1.10
Bacon (I bought the cheapest / lb) 5.50
sausage links ( generic) 5.98
Bratwurst 6 links 4.58
edys ice cream 3.88 1 QT
Rice Crispies 3.88
applesauce 3.28
Bananas 1.67 / lb NOT organic
Bell Pepper .82/ea
cucumber .64/ea
mushrooms (little box) 2.38
Eggs 12/ 2.94
Rice 20lbs 8.98
Bread/1 pkg 3.98

I noticed quite a few things that were higher..that's the only thing I purchased that day though. Food cost are really hurting us right now..we eat scrambled eggs and rice a lot and tuna patties..which I know isn't the best..but all we can afford. Just a few years ago..you could fill up a cart so high that sh!t was falling out and pay around 130 bucks. Now shopping cart full is around 300 bucks


Thanks for taking the time to post your list and I am sure everyone here will read it and compare, I find it fascinating when we get a grocery list posted and do the mental math as I read it.

Regards, Iwinder



posted on Apr, 29 2014 @ 11:10 AM
link   
a reply to: Iwinder
I live in Tehran,Iran and despite dollar prices sudden jump to about triple the real value a couple of years ago,we still enjoy releatively good prices at the market...Bread,25 cents a loaf..
vegetable oil one liter for75 cents..tomatoes 30 cents a pound..ground beef $2,50 a pound..olive oil $5 for a liter.. a bag of 75 grams potato chips is 25 cents..milk 50 cents a liter...fish is about a dollar a pound..gas is about 35 cents a liter.properties in Tehran start from about $ 1000,00 per square meter going up to astronomical figures depending on the area and the material used....There are commercial real estates in Tehran,s Bazar district pricing in range of about $ 50,000 or $60,000 per square meter....Keep in mind the average salary of an Iranian teacher is about $ 700.00 a month.



posted on Apr, 29 2014 @ 11:21 AM
link   

originally posted by: shapur
a reply to: Iwinder
I live in Tehran,Iran and despite dollar prices sudden jump to about triple the real value a couple of years ago,we still enjoy releatively good prices at the market...Bread,25 cents a loaf..
vegetable oil one liter for75 cents..tomatoes 30 cents a pound..ground beef $2,50 a pound..olive oil $5 for a liter.. a bag of 75 grams potato chips is 25 cents..milk 50 cents a liter...fish is about a dollar a pound..gas is about 35 cents a liter.properties in Tehran start from about $ 1000,00 per square meter going up to astronomical figures depending on the area and the material used....There are commercial real estates in Tehran,s Bazar district pricing in range of about $ 50,000 or $60,000 per square meter....Keep in mind the average salary of an Iranian teacher is about $ 700.00 a month.


Thanks Shapur for sharing your expenses with us, your bread and tomato prices are very low compared to what we pay in our part of Canada.
Your milk and fish is also very cheap!
Your housing is very very expensive!!!!!!! How can anyone afford those properties?

Many thanks for your post!
Regards, Iwinder



posted on Apr, 29 2014 @ 11:28 AM
link   
Hi, here from Belgium...
Damn Metric system...

Big Mac 3.95 Euro - 5.4 USD
Sugar (1 Kg / 2.2 Lbs ) 1.4 Euro - 1.9 USD
Butter (500 Gr / 1.1 Lbs) 1.8 Euro - 2.5 USD
Milk (1 Liter / 0.26 Gal) 0.65 Euro - 0.89 USD
Bread (800 Gr / 1.76 Lbs) 2.2 Euro - 3 USD
Eggs (12) 3.55 Euro - 4.9 USD
Beer (1 Liter / 0.26 Gal) 1.9 Euro - 2.6 USD
Pork chops (1 Kg / 2.2 Lbs) 8.45 Euro - 11.7 USD
Steak (1 kg / 2.2 Lbs) 17 Euro - 23.5 USD
Gasoline regular (1 Liter / 0.26 Gal) 1.7 Euro - 2.35 USD
Diesel fuel (1 Liter / 0.26 Gal) 1.45 Euro - 2 USD



posted on Apr, 29 2014 @ 11:32 AM
link   
I still think it's hysterical Canada puts milk in bags.

OP I might get in on this tomorrow. Interesting.



posted on Apr, 29 2014 @ 11:35 AM
link   
a reply to: Iwinder

Yes the housing is very expensive,specially in the big cities and Caspian sea areas.That is why a lot of people invest in the real estates including the banks and the government,and that is why having a house is an unreachable dream for a lot of Iranian youth...I used to live in Toronto in the 80,s and 90,s and the prices there seem to have almost doubled since then which is not that bad considering other countries annual inflation rates...cheers.



posted on Apr, 29 2014 @ 12:04 PM
link   

originally posted by: drneville
Hi, here from Belgium...
Damn Metric system...

Big Mac 3.95 Euro - 5.4 USD
Sugar (1 Kg / 2.2 Lbs ) 1.4 Euro - 1.9 USD
Butter (500 Gr / 1.1 Lbs) 1.8 Euro - 2.5 USD
Milk (1 Liter / 0.26 Gal) 0.65 Euro - 0.89 USD
Bread (800 Gr / 1.76 Lbs) 2.2 Euro - 3 USD
Eggs (12) 3.55 Euro - 4.9 USD
Beer (1 Liter / 0.26 Gal) 1.9 Euro - 2.6 USD
Pork chops (1 Kg / 2.2 Lbs) 8.45 Euro - 11.7 USD
Steak (1 kg / 2.2 Lbs) 17 Euro - 23.5 USD
Gasoline regular (1 Liter / 0.26 Gal) 1.7 Euro - 2.35 USD
Diesel fuel (1 Liter / 0.26 Gal) 1.45 Euro - 2 USD


Thanks for posting and taking the extra time to do some conversions.....your meat prices are very high compared to ours in Canada!
Its nice to have Belgium included in this thread.....

Regards, Iwinder



posted on Apr, 29 2014 @ 12:06 PM
link   

originally posted by: Domo1
I still think it's hysterical Canada puts milk in bags.

OP I might get in on this tomorrow. Interesting.


I believe it is only Ontario that does the milk bag thing but someone correct me if needed.
Please do get in on this if you can, everyone that posts builds up the thread, plus its fun to read the costs from around the world in real time.

Hope to see you soon Dom.
Regards, Iwinder



posted on Apr, 29 2014 @ 12:09 PM
link   

originally posted by: shapur
a reply to: Iwinder

Yes the housing is very expensive,specially in the big cities and Caspian sea areas.That is why a lot of people invest in the real estates including the banks and the government,and that is why having a house is an unreachable dream for a lot of Iranian youth...I used to live in Toronto in the 80,s and 90,s and the prices there seem to have almost doubled since then which is not that bad considering other countries annual inflation rates...cheers.


Yes the Toronto area and some areas in BC really blew up as far as housing costs go.
Not so much in the more less populated areas of Canada, for example our home has gone up in value by about 65K over the last 20 years so nothing really remarkable in our area.

Regards, Iwinder



posted on Apr, 30 2014 @ 08:48 AM
link   
The smell ,the water and the sellers on there are impolite.


I buy almost all my food from park n shop web store,because they delivered to your door.
edit on 30-4-2014 by candlestick because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 30 2014 @ 12:13 PM
link   
red caviar 2000 rubles per kilogram, or about $ 55, chili kilogram autumn 120 winter 500 rubles or $ 3,4-14,2
edit on 30/4/14 by mangust69 because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 30 2014 @ 01:01 PM
link   
Well, here is a copy of my receipt from the grocery store. It's too bad you guy's don't have an Aldi's in your area, or else you would probably rave about it, without a doubt. We also have milk in a bag where I'm from, although I'm not a huge fan. It certainly is cheaper by probably 50% but the taste is different.



If that helps? I hope I didn't leave too much identifying info on there, but that is where I'm from. I buy my milk and butter and eggs from the gas station. Milk $3.89/gallon for whole. Eggs/dozen 99 cents. Butter $1.49/lb. If I paid some of the prices that some of you are mentioning, I might go hungry. Thankfully I was blessed by my family with some good cooking skills that allow me to make tasty dishes out of not much. The key is veggies and spices. I'm a foodie, but non-traditional. Some things can be made easier with a packet than by hand.

There are certainly cheaper ways to get meat other than the supermarket. One is the local butcher, meat market. Another way is to contact any of your local hunting clubs who may want an extra person to buy in on a side of beef or pork. Beware of those door to door guys selling meat. It's a rip-off. Chicken is almost always cheap, and it's amazing what you can do with it. I learned right away that if you don't know what to do with your mystery meat(lol) just boil the # out of it. Cooking is an Art! Baking is science.

I would like to add, for anyone in the states, go to the ethnic foods aisle in your grocery store and you'll probably be surprised at the kinds of deals you can get. especially when it comes to spices and staples.

I'd be more than happy to tell y'all the sizes if you want, but I am actually too lazy to type it all out.



posted on Apr, 30 2014 @ 01:39 PM
link   
You can get food prices in the UK from visiting websites like: www.tesco.com...

Dollars = Pounds x 1.5

800g Brown Bread = £0.45 to 1.50
skimmed milk = 25p/pint
Aberdeen Angus Beef Burgers 340g = £2
Pringles 190g = £2.48 (BOGOF)
Brussel Sprouts (Loose = £0.06, 250g = £1.75)

I thought of doing something similer a decade ago and scanned in all my receipts from a decade ago. Currently in Norway, and prices are as follows:

(In Norwegian Kronar, 10 Kronar = 1 pound = 1.50 dollars)
Tine Milk skimmed = 21.50
Sliced chicken (pack of 10 slices) = 25.60
Croissants = 18.70
Hamburger Buns (six) = 20.90
Ilchester Cheddar = 42.50
Pepsi Cola bottle 500g = 17.90
Angus Burgers = 89.90
Monster Khaos (drink) = 21.90
Doritos = 33.90

You can easily hit 2000NOK plus if you are shopping for the New Year as all the food stores close.

In the UK, you can buy a gaming PC for £600, In Norway it would cost around 6000 NOK

In Norway, rents are really high, around 14000 NOK for an apartment, but cheaper if you buy a place.
Rents in the UK are between £500 and £800 per month outside of London, but astronomical inside London.


edit on 30-4-2014 by stormcell because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 30 2014 @ 02:35 PM
link   

originally posted by: mangust69
red caviar 2000 rubles per kilogram, or about $ 55, chili kilogram autumn 120 winter 500 rubles or $ 3,4-14,2


I have never eaten Caviar in my life, I was born and raised on the wrong side of the tracks (Poor) but the price is really a deal I figure?
Any Caviar eaters reading this that can add to it?

Your addition to the thread is appreciated.
Regards, Iwinder



posted on Apr, 30 2014 @ 02:59 PM
link   
a reply to: Iwinder

Being since you are from Canada, caviar is muskie eggs. They are technically called sturgeon. In the Black Sea, they are like gold. I've been a fisherman all my life, but have never caught one. Catch a small one and they are like 55 pounds. Excellent fight from what I've heard.



posted on Apr, 30 2014 @ 03:08 PM
link   
a reply to: dfens
Thanks for your fantastic post dfens!
Nice to see others putting up the goods with opinions.
Yes indeed your prices are much cheaper than what we pay just scanning your receipt everything is cheaper off the top of my head......the wife may correct on that observation.....



The key is veggies and spices.

Yes we do that too, lots of veggies but no salt and we pay a good buck for our pepper blend that my wife makes up but it is really good when fresh ground over our meals.

The price of your eggs is ridiculous, are you sure you are not getting them from your own hen house? :-)
At that price you can do a lot of cheap meals, we like breakfast for dinner and usually have that once every 2-3 weeks or so.



We also have milk in a bag where I'm from


Glad to hear its just not us in Ontario, I have been thinking about the very first time I saw a bag of milk since it was mentioned in this thread, and here is the deal.
It would be about 1970 or maybe 1969 and the milkman was on the way out.
We used to get our milk delivered in heavy glass bottles to our back door every day, you just left a note and money outside your door (lots of homes had a milk shoot/door) we did not but anyways that is how it worked.
The milkman delivers Mondays milk and takes your empties and money and order and come Tuesday morning you get Mondays order.....so forth and so on.

I remember this clearly because one morning my Mother started such a ruckus because the Milkman brought bags of milk with a free pitcher....Mom was up doing breakfast and got us all out of bed to see this new invention.

The milkman was gushing how great this is, he mentioned it keeps for a long time and it is light weight......see where I am going here?

Yep not 3 months later the home deliveries ceased and you had to go to the grocery store to get your milk.
So we got bags of milk but had to spend the time and gas money to go get them......and back then all stores here closed at either 5 or 6 pm so if you were running late you were out of luck.

Anyways I am side tracking here, great post and we are most envious of your food prices!

Regards, Iwinder



posted on Apr, 30 2014 @ 03:15 PM
link   

originally posted by: dfens
a reply to: Iwinder

Being since you are from Canada, caviar is muskie eggs. They are technically called sturgeon. In the Black Sea, they are like gold. I've been a fisherman all my life, but have never caught one. Catch a small one and they are like 55 pounds. Excellent fight from what I've heard.



Thanks for the information, Yep we have a major breeding ground right here in town for the infamous "Sturgeon" though the eggs never seem to be available here.

www.google.ca... bih=631


The link below just makes me want to scream!

www.theobserver.ca...


Thanks for informative post.

Regards, Iwinder



posted on Apr, 30 2014 @ 03:17 PM
link   

originally posted by: seeker1963
a reply to: Iwinder

He who controls the food, controls the world!

Agenda 21 in motion.

Believe it or not, it's here!



Ya ironically, I got my kid a new movie.. "Nut Job".. It specifically states it in the that movie..
edit on 4/30/2014 by ThichHeaded because: (no reason given)




top topics



 
18
<< 1  2    4 >>

log in

join