Esperanto anyone? - Learn the worlds easiest second language - in 3 months or less!

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posted on Apr, 27 2014 @ 03:31 PM
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Esperanto is a man made language designed specifically to be the easiest language to learn for all mankind so we can communicate without having to learn the speakers natural languages.

Esperanto is a living language activly developed since 1887 and spoken fluently by an estimated 2 million people world wide, some of those learning the language from birth as their primary language.

Created by Doctor Ludwik Zamenhof between 1878 and released in 1887, becaue Zamenhof felt our differing languages were a direct cause of fighting among the peoples of different nationalities. The language is not meant to supplant or replace our native languages, but rather as a second language we can all quickly learn and use to help communicate with our fellow earth citizens.

Most people can learn the basics of the language enough to speak comfortably in a matter of weeks - not months or years as with some languages.. IE the Chinese trying to learn English.. many have spent 10 years of study and still cannot speak English and yet they can be fluent in Esperanto in as little as 3 to 6 months.

en.wikipedia.org...

Sounds like a beautiful idea doesn't it..

However Dorothy all is not well in Kansas.

Many people want to misuse this language for the purposes of replacing all world native languages, making one universal language for all. The big problem with this is it will kill national sovereignty and identity, stripping away from us those things about our national pride that helps shape us and make us who we are.

This cannot be allowed to happen. It is acceptable in my opinion to think of Esperanto as " A" universal language due to it's ease of learning - just not " THE " universal language. However that should not mean one shouldn't learn this language. Just be wary you don't learn it and fall into someones agenda. (Obama and Soros)

As with any good thing there are always people seeking to use it for an agenda. Some claim if Esperanto was The Universal Language we would not fight and have wars.

I strongly disagree! There are native speakers in every country that do speak the same language and they still fight and have wars so this thinking is very naive. If people want to fight, they will in any language.

I mentioned George Soros and amazingly this guy everyone loves to hate is right smack in the middle of this controversy. Soro's father was a good friend of Dr. Zamenhof and helped champion the cause. As a child, George Soros is one of the relatively few people who grew up speaking Esperanto as his first primary language. In his mind, he sees first hand the benefit of such a language. I have no direct knowledge on if Soros wants to use the language to actually replace our native languages though this is suspected by many.. perhaps you guys can find a quote on this I missed.

Thanks to Stormdancer777 for the information in her thread Here: www.abovetopsecret.com... - a good read - check it out!

So, why learn this language?

It works. it's easy to learn and become fluent, and.. it's growing by leaps and bounds - but not by the globalist elite who want a universal language, but by normal folks all over the world who just want to communicate with people from other countries.

Esperanto has over 195.000 Wikipedia articles (the most of any man made language) and is recognized by Google as their 64th language that has a version of Google search.

The popular sites for learning Esperanto get hundreds of thousands of hits each day and every day it seems another Esperanto website pops up. There are tons of folks learning this now because of it's easy exposure and learning tools found free on the internet. The internet has really helped push the popularity of this language to such an extent that it is the most popular and studied of all the man made languages.

There is evidence that if one learns Esperanto first, they will be able to process the changes and pick up other languages like Spanish or french much easier than those who don't learn Esperanto first. Many kids in Britain enjoy learning Esperanto as a prelude to other languages via a program offered in public schools called Spriongboard2languages www.springboard2languages.org...

On this last note I leave you with a story. I was forced to take Spanish as an elective in the 8th grade. On the first day we were taught how to conjugate a verb in Spanish. I had no clue what the teacher was talking about - because I had never learned how to conjugate a verb in English. I'm 46 now and I cannot even tell you what conjugating a verb means or have any clue on why the hell I'd ever need to do it. I made a decision to sleep in class every day until the end of the year. I felt I'd never have a use for Spanish and it was wrong for the school to force me to learn it. My parents agreed. I did take home the one A I got though on Spanish Cooking Day LOL. (I made a jalapeno spinach dish)

My point is if Esperanto had been available for me to choose, I may have not failed that elective so badly and might have went on at learn or at least try to appreciate a language like Spanish.

Esperanto example:


Free resources for learning Esperanto:

en.lernu.net... - web based
www.kurso.com.br... - downloadable software for PC
pacujo.net... free email course
www.esperanto-usa.org... - web based

There are Tons more free resources to find via a Google search.

I'm starting my journey to learn this today. (using the Kurso de Esperanto program from the 2nd link above) Wish me luck. LOL

What do you guys think of this language and or it's potential uses - good or bad?
edit on 27-4-2014 by JohnPhoenix because: sp




posted on Apr, 27 2014 @ 04:35 PM
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a reply to: JohnPhoenix

No thanks, I will stick to English.
See the 9 part documentary and book The Story of English
It shows how English is an adaptable language, that it accepts new words from other languages, not like French that wants to ban words like Drug Store (pharmacie), Computer (ordinateur).

According the wiki article, there is only 10,000 people who speak it fluently.

"Finnish linguist Jouko Lindstedt, an expert on native-born Esperanto speakers, presented the following scheme[1] to show the overall proportions of language capabilities within the Esperanto community:
1,000 have Esperanto as their native language.
10,000 speak it fluently.
100,000 can use it actively.
1,000,000 understand a large amount passively.
10,000,000 have studied it to some extent at some time."



posted on Apr, 27 2014 @ 04:39 PM
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Oh Esperanto. I learned it for a class in middle school and then promptly forgot it. While it was designed to be a universal language I've always seen it as more of a novelty.granted that may be due to the way I was introduced to it but 15 years later it hasn't caught on and I've never found anyone who knows about it outside of people that were in that class.



posted on Apr, 27 2014 @ 04:39 PM
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I actually think it's a cool idea and do know someone who is learning (think she found something free online to get started) and it never hurts anyone to learn languages, whether those are traditional, man-made or sign...



posted on Apr, 27 2014 @ 04:52 PM
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a reply to: MinangATS

You will stick to English because you already know it. Imagine if your Chinese or some other non romantic language trying to study English. It is my understanding that the types of languages that so greatly differ from our western or Romantic languages make it very hard to learn English.

Americans need to realize Chinese is the world most spoken language with 1,146,755,000 native speakers and 1,343,755,000 secondary speakers. English (which comes in 3rd, Hindu is 2nd) Only has 341,000,000 native speakers and 508,000,000 secondary speakers. Thats a drop in the bucket compared to Chinese speaking people. www.nationsonline.org...

I don't know why most Americans if not most English speaking people seem to think English is some kind of universal language when it so clearly isn't in both numbers of users and ease of learning.

Clearly English isn't enough to get the job done when it's so hard to learn for the majority of peoples on earth - the Chinese.
edit on 27-4-2014 by JohnPhoenix because: sp



posted on Apr, 27 2014 @ 04:52 PM
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English is such a rich language. Why replace it with something inferior?

It all sounds like a good academic project. Nothing more.

Regards



posted on Apr, 27 2014 @ 04:53 PM
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I gave Esperanto a whirl in my teens, as I did with most languages. While it is simple to grasp, it never resonated with me, and I don't recall any of it today.

Basically, being a created language and not a naturally blossoming one, it's as much a novelty as Klingon or Elvish is. That doesn't mean it's not valid, you can communicate with it. It's simply so seldom spoken & unnecessary that it's just like a novelty item. Cool to look at/have, but virtually useless on a wider scale until it catches on. With that, I bid you qapla'.



posted on Apr, 27 2014 @ 04:59 PM
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a reply to: paraphi

You may want to re-read the opening post. The purpose of this language as intended was not to replace our native languages, but to give people a secondary language that's easier to learn for all so we can communicate without having to learn many other natural languages.

Only some groups who want to misuse the language want to replace our native languages with it. i denounce these ideas but applaud the use of the language as a secondary language. We must always keep our national languages at all cost.



posted on Apr, 27 2014 @ 05:00 PM
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a reply to: JohnPhoenix

Im glad you made a thread on this! One of things I have found in reading over some things is the complaint that not everyone even agrees on the grammar and what is right in the language...however what language does?

The reason why its so good is because the world could learn it quickly...what a great way to just be able to communicate with anyone on the planet! It needs more funding and advertising...you can take it in duolingo or live mocha...i forget which one..or maybe both.

Ive actually considered trying to make a business out of it...teaching it online or in small groups. It could break a lot of barriers.



posted on Apr, 27 2014 @ 05:04 PM
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originally posted by: Nyiah
I gave Esperanto a whirl in my teens, as I did with most languages. While it is simple to grasp, it never resonated with me, and I don't recall any of it today.

Basically, being a created language and not a naturally blossoming one, it's as much a novelty as Klingon or Elvish is. That doesn't mean it's not valid, you can communicate with it. It's simply so seldom spoken & unnecessary that it's just like a novelty item. Cool to look at/have, but virtually useless on a wider scale until it catches on. With that, I bid you qapla'.


A common reason for learning this would be to visit another country like Germany for instance. I would be able to learn and speak Esperanto with a German speaker much faster than i could learn German or he English. On the internet now there are lots of Esperanto chat rooms and other online and offline communities folks do use to help keep their Esperanto fresh. You didn't have that advantage in school years ago like folks have now. So people meet others say from Germany who can speak it, travel there, meet them and have a cool tour guide that they can easily speak to. It's a very popular thing to do I understand.



posted on Apr, 27 2014 @ 05:10 PM
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a reply to: JohnPhoenix

Granted Chinese is spoken by more people in China, but English is spoken/understood in more different countries as a second language than Chinese. When I travel outside of Indonesia, it is far easer to find someone who understands English than Chinese.

Just my two cents.



posted on Apr, 27 2014 @ 05:13 PM
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a reply to: JohnPhoenix

I have heard of this and it is a neutral in my mind. However after reading this and watching the video I want to learn.



posted on Apr, 27 2014 @ 05:15 PM
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a reply to: MinangATS

Having traveled the world, it is not as common as you would think in most countries. I almost had better luck speaking Spanish which I am poor at than English.



posted on Apr, 27 2014 @ 06:30 PM
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I'm not even going to learn Finn. I study ancient languages, but not to speak, just to compare to the modern languages. I'm studying patterns and similarities.

If someone wants to talk to me they can learn english or have a translator.



posted on Apr, 27 2014 @ 07:33 PM
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originally posted by: JohnPhoenix

originally posted by: Nyiah
I gave Esperanto a whirl in my teens, as I did with most languages. While it is simple to grasp, it never resonated with me, and I don't recall any of it today.

Basically, being a created language and not a naturally blossoming one, it's as much a novelty as Klingon or Elvish is. That doesn't mean it's not valid, you can communicate with it. It's simply so seldom spoken & unnecessary that it's just like a novelty item. Cool to look at/have, but virtually useless on a wider scale until it catches on. With that, I bid you qapla'.


A common reason for learning this would be to visit another country like Germany for instance. I would be able to learn and speak Esperanto with a German speaker much faster than i could learn German or he English.


I dont see the value as most Germans under seventy already speak English. As someone who teaches English and is learning Spanish I have to say that learning English isnt nearly as hard as your making it out to be. Also, English is spreading like wildfire around the world and there are a lot more non native speakers of English than Native. Like the other poster I see this Language as a novelty. Good presentation tho s&f
edit on 27-4-2014 by Tucket because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 28 2014 @ 01:19 AM
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originally posted by: Tucket

originally posted by: JohnPhoenix

originally posted by: Nyiah
I gave Esperanto a whirl in my teens, as I did with most languages. While it is simple to grasp, it never resonated with me, and I don't recall any of it today.

Basically, being a created language and not a naturally blossoming one, it's as much a novelty as Klingon or Elvish is. That doesn't mean it's not valid, you can communicate with it. It's simply so seldom spoken & unnecessary that it's just like a novelty item. Cool to look at/have, but virtually useless on a wider scale until it catches on. With that, I bid you qapla'.


A common reason for learning this would be to visit another country like Germany for instance. I would be able to learn and speak Esperanto with a German speaker much faster than i could learn German or he English.


I dont see the value as most Germans under seventy already speak English. As someone who teaches English and is learning Spanish I have to say that learning English isnt nearly as hard as your making it out to be. Also, English is spreading like wildfire around the world and there are a lot more non native speakers of English than Native. Like the other poster I see this Language as a novelty. Good presentation tho s&f


Your problem is you never tried to learn English from a language like Chinese as your natural language.



posted on Apr, 28 2014 @ 01:28 AM
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originally posted by: Xcalibur254
Oh Esperanto. I learned it for a class in middle school and then promptly forgot it. While it was designed to be a universal language I've always seen it as more of a novelty.granted that may be due to the way I was introduced to it but 15 years later it hasn't caught on and I've never found anyone who knows about it outside of people that were in that class.


I'd like to hear more on how you were introduced to it. It may be very pertinent to this thread.



posted on Apr, 28 2014 @ 01:45 AM
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a reply to: JohnPhoenix

dunno why people are so anti this. D: it's just a language and a cool one at that. I'd like to learn as many as I can; I know some Norsk, some Swedish, some spanish, some french, some gaelic, some german..... you're not betraying your mother language by learning others, folks


It's not bad. It's not horrible. It's actually probably good for ones brain to learn more languages.



posted on Apr, 28 2014 @ 02:09 AM
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the Vonyich manuscript is written in Esparanto /end sarcasm

Its popular within the Portuguese community in my town, but not amongst those of anglo decent. I considered learning it but like an earlier poster, I decided Spanish would be more useful to learn.



posted on Apr, 28 2014 @ 02:30 AM
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I always thought Esperanto was some sort of joke I never actually got in Red Dwarf.

As a result, I was even more amused when I found out it was a real language...never really looked much into it though.





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