It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

NASA Announces First Earth Twin in Habitable Zone Discovered by Kepler

page: 5
72
<< 2  3  4    6 >>

log in

join
share:

posted on Apr, 18 2014 @ 12:27 PM
link   
a reply to: JadeStar


Of course it is not the first Earth sized planet. It's significant because its the FIRST EARTH SIZED PLANET IN A HABITABLE ZONE OF THE STAR IT ORBITS.


Although true, That's not what either the article on my thread about it says nor this article says.
So. Still blatantly misleading any way you look at it. They both say planet in habitable zone, which leads anyone to the notion that It's any of the 1000+ earth-like, earth-sized planets that have been found up to date in the "habitable zone"

"Habitable zone" is NOT the definition of that red dwarf star's 'orbit' at which this "new" planet has been located. A Habitable zone refers to the area in space at which life can potentially live, also known at the moment, as the Goldilocks Zone.

And no my information in not full of errors and nice coffee mug. You can buy one anywhere online. There's idiots with masters degrees and brilliant minds with high school GEDs. Doesn't mean squat where you 'claim' to work (based on a coffee mug)

Get off yourself. Nobodies impressed and nobody particularly cares.
edit on 4/18/2014 by unb3k44n7 because: (no reason given)




posted on Apr, 18 2014 @ 12:36 PM
link   
a reply to: JadeStar

I want to know how an artist can tell us how the planet looks. I don't believe it looks like they show. All they can tell is there is a tiny source of light, or more likely the shadow of the planet as it passes between us and it's sun.

Anyone have any input on planets they find, and then draw, that are hundreds to millions of light-years away?



posted on Apr, 18 2014 @ 12:50 PM
link   

originally posted by: unb3k44n7
a reply to: JadeStar


Of course it is not the first Earth sized planet. It's significant because its the FIRST EARTH SIZED PLANET IN A HABITABLE ZONE OF THE STAR IT ORBITS.


Although true, That's not what either the article on my thread about it says nor this article says.


Your thread referred to a RUMOR. May I quote it the article you linked in your misleading post?


Jesus Diaz
Filed to: INTERESTING. EARTH. PLANETS, WORLDS, ALIENS
3/24/14 12:44am


The search for a new Earth outside the solar system seems to be nearing its end. NASA's Ames Research Center astronomer Thomas Barclay has found a planet nearly the size of Earth in the habitable zone of a star in the Milky Way.

Barclay's announcement at the Search for Life Beyond the Solar System conference hasn't been officially published yet, so the details are scarce. We know that:

1. It's an M1 red dwarf star (maybe we should call it Krypton.)

2. It's a goldilocks planet, orbiting within the zone where liquid water (and life) can exist.

3. It's radius is only 1.1 times the size of Earth. Until now the minimum size for a new Earth candidate was 1.4 times—Kepler-62f, which orbits a star about 1,200 light years away from us.

4. At least five other planets are orbiting this red dwarf.



Now if you really want to play the "I posted this first" nonsensical game....

The announcement yesterday was confirmation of that rumor which if you recall PRIOR TO THE GIZMODO ARTICLE - I hinted at HERE ON ATS back in FEBRUARY a FULL MONTH BEFORE YOUR FREAKIN POST: First Earth Twin that's Habitable to be Announced By NASA on Wednesday? - See more at: www.abovetopsecret.com... - Feb 24, 2014



So. Still blatantly misleading any way you look at it.


Your thread was misleading as you stated a rumor as fact.

Pot. Kettle. Look into it.




They both say planet in habitable zone, which leads anyone to the notion that It's any of the 1000+ earth-like, earth-sized planets that have been found up to date in the "habitable zone"


Do you know the difference between Earth sized and Earthlike? Clearly no. My time with you is wasted.



"Habitable zone" is NOT the definition of that red dwarf star's 'orbit' at which this "new" planet has been located.


Ehm. Yes it is. Learn to read.






A Habitable zone refers to the area in space at which life can potentially live, also known at the moment, as the Goldilocks Zone.


Yes. We grown ups call them Habitable Zones.

Again.... Say it with me: Kepler 186f is the first Earth radius sized planet in the habitable zone of a star.




And no my information in not full of errors


It was. And you should use something better than "Gizmodo" as a source. You know, like ArXiv......



and nice coffee mug. You can buy one anywhere online.


Actually you can't. Only the Kepler Science Team and those who work with them have them. Go try and find one. I dare you.


There's idiots with masters degrees and brilliant minds with high school GEDs. Doesn't mean squat where you 'claim' to work (based on a coffee mug)


At this point you're just attacking me, and I don't know why?
God forbid I actually work in the field and know what I'm talking about.... Maybe I should leave ATS again. People like you are time wasters.



Get off yourself. Nobodies impressed and nobody particularly cares.


Dude, you look like the person who needs to get over themselves. "my thread, my my my". Its an internet forum, you don't own it. Chill.

Stop being a troll. And a poor one at that.
edit on 18-4-2014 by JadeStar because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 18 2014 @ 01:03 PM
link   
a reply to: JadeStar

I have things to do other than to formulate pointless comebacks to your pointless comebacks. You're an idiot and have a great day.



posted on Apr, 18 2014 @ 01:03 PM
link   

originally posted by: unb3k44n7
a reply to: JadeStar

I have things to do other than to formulate pointless comebacks to your pointless comebacks. You're an idiot and have a great day.


Likewise.



posted on Apr, 18 2014 @ 01:07 PM
link   
a reply to: JadeStar

Don't mind the jerks, they have no idea what side the bread is buttered on, much less know what butter is (or bread. seriously. there's this one monk bread recipe that people line up for).



posted on Apr, 18 2014 @ 01:11 PM
link   

originally posted by: SixX18
a reply to: JadeStar

I want to know how an artist can tell us how the planet looks. I don't believe it looks like they show. All they can tell is there is a tiny source of light, or more likely the shadow of the planet as it passes between us and it's sun.

Anyone have any input on planets they find, and then draw, that are hundreds to millions of light-years away?



Good question. And you're right.

These artists representations (they are almost always labelled as such, or should be) are usually drawn by astro-artists based on educated guesses and speculation in addition to the very basic information we may have about a world.

These are people who take things like light source, color of light from source, atmosphere, planet size, mass, and orbit into account with regards to what they draw based on what we know about planet formation.

They may look like that, or we may be surprised and they look entirely different. It will be wonderful when we have photos rather than paintings but that will take time and money.

I'll say most of the time they try to stick as close to the science as possible.

Check out the Scientific Exoplanets Renderer


The Scientific Exoplanets Renderer (SER) is a new scientific software tool to generate photorealistic visualizations of exoplanets. It uses physical properties from exoplanets and their parent stars to generate possible scenarios for their visual appearance as seem from space. Many parameters can be adjusted based on estimates of their atmospheric and surface physics and chemistry. It includes the reconstruction of realistic atmospheric clouds motion and weather effects.

SER is specially designed to reconstruct Earth-like exoplanets, either rocky or ocean in nature, but it is also able to generate visuals for gas giants and stars. SER can be used to interpret and visualize results from General Circulation Models (GCM), reconstruct light-curves, albedo studies, and stellar transit simulations, including moons. Current test models of SER operate in the visual range but future developments will include a wider spectrum.

SER is a scientific tool and it tries to reproduce the physical and chemical interactions of light with matter at planetary scales. This is a time consuming process for computers and not suitable for fast or interactive views of exoplanets. Below are listed some nice educational alternatives for quick visuals of exoplanets.


Also check out the Ashland Astro Studio: www.astrostudio.org...
edit on 18-4-2014 by JadeStar because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 18 2014 @ 01:15 PM
link   
Attack the post not the poster
assumed their would be more intelligent minds at work here
all2human
edit on 18-4-2014 by all2human because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 18 2014 @ 01:19 PM
link   
If you want to prance around the playground and play "he said she said"/ "they started it" we can play that game.
Starting with the fact that you attacked my post 'first'. My post at which wasn't even directed at you or for you.
At which you then took it, ran with it, and made it into your own personal pissing contest in the same breath that you said It's not a pissing contest. And then continued to run with it with more personal attacks and a false sense of superiority display.

So get the F* off me. If your jobs so important get to work and off here. It's noon, go look at some space trajectory models or something.

I'm such a jerk for initiating a personal argument that I didn't initiate. (LOL)

Now that I've wasted a half hour on BS.



posted on Apr, 18 2014 @ 01:53 PM
link   
a reply to: unb3k44n7


Actually, from what I read (I have read all of the posts on this thread), you actually posted first attacking that you already posted about this.

Jade, fantastic find and very informative.

The purpose of this site, from my understanding, is to deny ignorance, not perpetuate it. Jade has provided sourced material with very informative, understandable explanations for the layperson (in the field of astronomy, such as myself).

I believe there is other life in this universe based on a sheer numbers game. The extent of intelligent life (and how intelligent), is another conundrum. Although, to be fair, "intelligence" is a human-made word and context-specific metric.

edit on 18-4-2014 by ExNihiloRed because: Grammar



posted on Apr, 18 2014 @ 02:19 PM
link   

originally posted by: unb3k44n7
If you want to prance around the playground and play "he said she said"/ "they started it" we can play that game.
Starting with the fact that you attacked my post 'first'. My post at which wasn't even directed at you or for you.
At which you then took it, ran with it, and made it into your own personal pissing contest in the same breath that you said It's not a pissing contest. And then continued to run with it with more personal attacks and a false sense of superiority display.

So get the F* off me. If your jobs so important get to work and off here. It's noon, go look at some space trajectory models or something.

I'm such a jerk for initiating a personal argument that I didn't initiate. (LOL)

Now that I've wasted a half hour on BS.




im new around here and was wondering if there is a way to ignore "people" like this, i have seen it done on other forums you click a button below the name and from then on you cant see them or their garbage until you click the button again.
if there is an ignore feature i am not finding it.

posters like this really ruin the flow of a good thread and bring morale down, its such a shame..

Thanks and sorry for my engish



posted on Apr, 18 2014 @ 04:32 PM
link   
I'm not going to apologize for pointing out that there's a thread on it already.
I'm not going to admit that it was an attack because it was pointing out something and not an attack.
It's getting old seeing 900 duplicate threads on the same subjects constantly so excuse me for being a bit annoyed.
It's annoying that I posted a thread on it a month ago and because there is another thread about it a month later with pretty uploaded pictures/displays and a misleading title that makes it sound more exciting that the same topic that was posted a month before it gets a shoulder turned to it.
It's annoying that It's ok for a member to attack another. It's annoying that you have a post a coffee mug with a smug face like you're better than everyone and to gain supporters to grill on another member for just for pointing out misleading titles and info.

How many threads do we need of the same topic again? Do we have an estimate/goal that we're shooting for here or what

JADE can be informative without directing replies to me "personally." I don't want to hear from Jade's high-horse. Yes there should be an ignore button.

Thread derailed because of blatant stupidity.
I don't particularly give a crap if my views or posts are popular or liked or not. I'm not here to be your buddies.



posted on Apr, 18 2014 @ 04:50 PM
link   
JadeStar; They mentioned at the press conference that they're not certain if the planet Kepler 186 f is tidally locked or not. Is this something that can be calculated from the present data, given sufficient time, or will additional information be required?



posted on Apr, 18 2014 @ 04:55 PM
link   
a reply to: cestrup
Love your comment



posted on Apr, 18 2014 @ 05:49 PM
link   

originally posted by: unb3k44n7
It's annoying that I posted a thread on it a month ago and because there is another thread about it a month later with pretty uploaded pictures/displays and a misleading title that makes it sound more exciting that the same topic that was posted a month before it gets a shoulder turned to it.

I am little confused as to how you could have posted this a month ago when the information was just released yesterday?
Also, the topic you started back in May has nothing to do with this discovery, at all. You posted about an upcoming announcement about a possible planet being discovered. How do we even know this is the same planet? Per your source in the thread you posted:

The search for a new Earth outside the solar system seems to be nearing its end. NASA's Ames Research Center astronomer Thomas Barclay has found a planet nearly the size of Earth in the habitable zone of a star in the Milky Way.
source not sure why you're getting upset about this thread. www.abovetopsecret.com...

As you can see here, there are other planets that could be in habitable zones, your thread could be referencing any of these, again Jade's thread is about Kepler 186F, your thread did not mention any names:


originally posted by: JadeStar
Here's something interesting.
Kepler 186f was also known as KOI 571.05 before it was confirmed (All Kepler unconfirmed planets have KOI XXnumbers, the confirmed ones become Kepler XX numbered planets)
Here is Kepler 186f on a table of unconfirmed (prior to today) planets with high ESI (Earth Similarity Index) numbers.
Notice I highlighted in green at the bottom with Kepler 186f written in red next to it:

What this says is that there are a whole lot better candidate planets in the pipeline waiting to be confirmed or announced

Of course some may be false positives and eliminated entirely but there should at least be a few more announcements like today's this year.



Back on topic, I bet this would be a beautiful sight:

Standing on the shore at dusk, you see four planets and an orange sun near the horizon. At night, dazzling ribbons of auroras snake across the sky. You are on Kepler-186f, the smallest known exoplanet thought capable of supporting life.
source

Thanks again, Jade! You're posts are always enjoyable to read and beautifully presented

edit on 18-4-2014 by Jennyfrenzy because: added on topic info

edit on 18-4-2014 by Jennyfrenzy because: added additional info and source

edit on 18-4-2014 by Jennyfrenzy because: fixed error

edit on 18-4-2014 by Jennyfrenzy because: (no reason given)
extra DIV



posted on Apr, 18 2014 @ 07:13 PM
link   
a reply to: JadeStar

More conformation for the notion that this universe is littered with many (countless) planets mirroring our Earth... and that life is wriggling everywhere... and not just on rocks that happen to be in our "Goldilocks" zones.

Even years before I saw tech indicative of unknown and higher intelligences, I thought this universe was full of it... life, that is.

The view we are alone is egocentric and ridiculous. The view no other living thing could reach us in a relatively short amount of time is becoming more unlikely with every exponential increase in tech in our own civilization.

In the vastness of this universe in volume and age, thinking nothing has lived and learned to the point of easily traveling between stars is... well, silly.

Heh, and seeing something completely astounding and "alien" in our sky with ones own eyes kinda puts the whole discussion to rest for the person who sees the tech... but it's understandable and good that people are intellectually careful.

Either way, thanks for bringing the news to this site... appreciated and cool as heck.



posted on Apr, 18 2014 @ 07:44 PM
link   
Fantastic post! we're getting closer.....

We live in exciting times!



posted on Apr, 18 2014 @ 08:12 PM
link   
a reply to: JadeStar

That's cool I suppose, I was never much for astronomy but a passing fancy, you however seem to really be into this sort of thing. I would not put all my eggs in one basket based on circumstantial evidence, dots moving on a screen thousands of light years away. Well! You never really know what or how a thing is till your knee deep in its atmosphere to sort of say.

Besides there seem to be plenty of stars and planets out there, a variable ocean of stars literally, after all the universe is a pretty big place, think of the biggest number you can think of, then imagine that that number is insignificant in the sum of things. And you would get the scope of things, what I am saying is, that even the worst odds you could think of would say that in all of that, the vastness of it, that the chance of other earth like planets being out there somewhere all in various stages of there evolution is pretty dam likely.



posted on Apr, 19 2014 @ 12:44 AM
link   

originally posted by: SLAYER69
Has the thought ever occurred to anybody else that we 'The Earth' may have already been spotted in our 'goldielocks zone' by others a long time ago? I mean, if we with our meager 21st Century Tech can do it why couldn't other even more advanced Civilizations have spotted us in ours?


Ummm Yeah Kinda Sort Like this

After Earth was Discovered by them a Civ type 2 just maybe this happened Complete with a BIO Vault AKA ARK




And We may Do the Same in the Distant Future

They're other Star Systems Much Older Then Ours Millions to Billions


edit on 19-4-2014 by Wolfenz because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 19 2014 @ 10:11 AM
link   
a reply to: BuzzyWigs

Right on you know the heavens probably have a lot more to offer than a bunch of dead planets.




top topics



 
72
<< 2  3  4    6 >>

log in

join