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Cellular Mobile Technology: The Next Generation

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posted on Mar, 20 2014 @ 05:56 PM
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Dropped calls, failed calls & texts, poor voice quality, difficulty connecting to data, buffering... we have all been there before. But what if I told you that was all a thing of the past? What if I told you that you could have uninterrupted fiber internet speeds on your phone and wireless devices?

Welcome to the future.

The technology turns conventional wisdom about wireless technology on it's head.

This Man Says He Can Speed Cell Data 1,000-Fold
Steve Perlman: pCell's wireless tech is real, and it will change the world
pCell demonstration at Columbia




posted on Mar, 20 2014 @ 06:25 PM
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We never seem to stop to think what all this is doing to our body's and how the cell's communicate with each other ,

we are moving way too fast to find out and most study's are paid for by the very bodies that have most to hide '
why have schools got those cell towers near them while other country's ban them ?

maybe i am old but i do not trust those things i like not being contacted by a cell

i will not comply i am not borg



posted on Mar, 20 2014 @ 06:50 PM
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That's cool ! Soon TPTB will even know when we turn our lights on ... Ultimate tracking technology.

Thanks Mr Tesla !



posted on Mar, 20 2014 @ 06:54 PM
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reply to post by OatDelphi
 


Realistically I have a 4G LTE phone and I have really good speeds and no drops in my calls and really good service, never had buffering problems. Making it faster and more efficient by a thousand fold is a whole new dimension in overkill.



posted on Mar, 20 2014 @ 07:28 PM
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Yea I agree. When is too much going to be too much?



posted on Mar, 20 2014 @ 07:30 PM
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Ever been to a packed stadium with a 4g LTE phone? Doesn't quite work the way you have grown accustomed to. All that interference and wait times makes even the best service as slow if not slower than dial-up. Now imagine that lack of service everyday everywhere.

That's what's coming with the advent of wireless everything. There's a reason we are fading out IPV4 addresses & currently rolling into IPV6.



posted on Mar, 20 2014 @ 07:43 PM
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I totally understand that. Sometimes I feel as if technology is moving just too fast. Don't get me wrong, I love my fast connection speed just as much as the next tech junkie does. We will just have to see how it all plays out in the future.



posted on Mar, 20 2014 @ 08:14 PM
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reply to post by OatDelphi
 


Wow, . . . I don't know what to say other then that.

The system is not switching to other bandwidths but taking advantage of device interferences by essentially tagging that interference pattern and incorporating it into how the signal is processed.

This is not a signal modulation but more of a processing modulation that really seems too good to be true.

I don't think this service would work with weak processors and is heavily dependent on the increasing processing power of smart phones.

Really curious if they will demonstrate any of the obviously insane maths used to make this work.

Here is a video to help people understand a little bit of the basics (I mean BASICS) involving signals and how they are sent and received.


-FBB
edit on 20-3-2014 by FriedBabelBroccoli because: 101



posted on Mar, 20 2014 @ 08:36 PM
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reply to post by FriedBabelBroccoli
 

If you are really interested check out my last link in the OP.


He doesn't give up his proprietary know-how but he explains it pretty in depth.



PS. Thanks for the awesome video. I'll be subscribing to that youtube channel.
edit on 20-3-2014 by OatDelphi because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 20 2014 @ 08:48 PM
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OatDelphi
reply to post by FriedBabelBroccoli
 

If you are really interested check out my last link in the OP.


He doesn't give up his proprietary know-how but he explains it pretty in depth.


Ahhh yes, that is why I linked to that video series as it is specifically about SDR or software defined radio. It basically uses the computer's processors to "clean" up fuzzy signals or otherwise known as "modulate" them.

venturebeat.com...


VentureBeat: How much does software drive pCell?

Perlman: Our team member, Mario di Dio, has made huge strides in software-defined radio. We don’t have a baseband chip. We’re clocking that out in software. We have come up with new computational mathematical techniques. Software-defined radio has been a hobby until now. With the introduction of pCell, it’s a commercial proposition. We just entered an entirely new field.

VentureBeat: How does pCell differ from MIMO technology?

Perlman: MIMO is a term used to describe many, many different systems. What is really means is multiple input and multiple output, which means there’s many antennae going into the channel and many antennae going out of the channel. MIMO usually refers to the kind of MIMO that’s used in LTE. In that case, you have multiple antennae at a base station that then are communicating to one or more antennae in a user device — it’s usually a multiple of 2-to-2 or 4-to-4.

The trouble with MIMO is because the antennae on both sides are very close to each other, there’s no angular diversity. So what happens is, if you have a line-of-sight path right to something, and then there is no multipath, there’s no bouncing off of walls — take outer space — MIMO doesn’t work at all.


I am watching the video of his presentation and its clear SDR is used heavily which means processing power.

But I want to see the proprietary goodies he has hidden in those boxes. I am working towards my FE (electrical engineering) and have been nerding out so hard on this stuff lately that just hearing "better signals" does nothing for me.

I am greedy and want to see the math and physics of how he did it. It really seems too good to be true.

-FBB



posted on Mar, 20 2014 @ 10:52 PM
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reply to post by OatDelphi
 


Well a good thing that everything comes with a mac address so they can be easily converted to ipv6 and yes I've been in crowded stadiums, underground train stations(union station) , tall skyscrapers, and I've never had any problem with my service, I go too school in downtown Chicago, so yes I've been in places where signal can get questionable, and it's still gonna be a little while before ipv6 gets rolled out and I will be ready to implement it when the time comes.
0:0:0:0:0:0:0:1



posted on Mar, 20 2014 @ 11:44 PM
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DonVoigt
reply to post by OatDelphi
 


...and it's still gonna be a little while before ipv6 gets rolled out and I will be ready to implement it when the time comes.
0:0:0:0:0:0:0:1


It's already being rolled out.

Verizon already has 46% of their services using IPV6
Google Fiber is at 76% IPV6
Comcast is currently switching and at 25%
T-mobile is at 18%
AT&T 16%

www.worldipv6launch.org...



posted on Mar, 28 2014 @ 11:02 AM
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Just wanted to add an interesting ongoing article from digitstodollars.com...

A look at Artemis and the pCell: Part 1- The Basics

Artemis and the pCell Part 2 – How it kinda works

Artemis and the pCell Part 3: Does it Work?

Also Artemis has their website up and running now if you are wanting to take a look.

www.artemis.com...



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