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4,200 NY hospital patients face possible hepatitis, HIV exposure

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posted on Mar, 13 2014 @ 09:09 AM
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4,200 NY hospital patients face possible hepatitis, HIV exposure

A New York hospital warned 4,247 people of potential exposure to hepatitis B, hepatitis C and HIV after authorities discovered a risk of potential blood contamination.

In the letter dated February 22, South Nassau Communities Hospital said the patients may have received insulin from an insulin pen reservoir – not the pen's single-use disposable needle – that may have been used with more than one person.


That is just wow!! And all that in New York, not in a 3rd World Country. This is unacceptable and I hope most of the people are not infected with anything.

I'll post updates..


RT

Reuters


The pens should be limited to one patient because regurgitation of blood into the insulin cartridge can occur after injection, creating a risk of blood-borne pathogen transmission, even when the needle is changed, according to the

CDC.

Some 200 of the more than 4,000 patients who were warned have signed up for free blood testing, WABC-TV reported.

edit on 13-3-2014 by Hellas because: (no reason given)




posted on Mar, 13 2014 @ 09:16 AM
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Unacceptable indeed! I think they try to save a buck and look what happens!



posted on Mar, 13 2014 @ 09:18 AM
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The pens each contain multiple insulin doses with disposable needles. While nurses used new needles for each patient, they did not use a fresh pen.
Blood may have back-flowed into the chamber contaminating the insulin, the hospital warned.
“It’s just shocking to hear something like that,” said hospital visitor Peter Vetro. “I just can’t believe that.”


CBS



posted on Mar, 13 2014 @ 09:33 AM
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So, I wonder how long this practice was going on. I also wonder how many other hospitals use this practice. For what they charge a patient in hospital for medicines, they could definitely afford single dose units. Even an aspirin can be twenty bucks when given in a hospital...it is probably a generic aspirin too.



posted on Mar, 13 2014 @ 09:39 AM
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rickymouse
So, I wonder how long this practice was going on. I also wonder how many other hospitals use this practice. For what they charge a patient in hospital for medicines, they could definitely afford single dose units. Even an aspirin can be twenty bucks when given in a hospital...it is probably a generic aspirin too.


Who knows really, which is a sickening thing to think about.

This story sounded familiar so I searched and this is what I found. Looks like here in Buffalo in Jan of 2013 we had the same story break in the news. *sigh*....


BUFFALO, N.Y. |More than 700 patients admitted to the Veterans Affairs Western New York Healthcare System over a two-year period may have been exposed to HIV, hepatitis B and hepatitis C, authorities said Monday.
1/24/13 CBSnews.com Article

ETA: Important to note that in both cases it was re-used insulin pens.
edit on 13-3-2014 by MyMindIsMyOwn because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 13 2014 @ 09:52 AM
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I had just seen a huge advertising billboard here in Michigan yesterday,which had a CDC alert message on it for those born between 1945-1965 regarding Hep C Virus. I came home and naturally googled it Here and was amazed that they had a list of reasons why they are concerned for the baby boomers, but none of them seemed definite in their reasoning?

I would imagine it would be their concern that hospitals were as inept in their practices, as these newer cases are unfolding, are today. Personally, I at the time thought 'Whew, I am safe being born after 1965' but now I have to wonder...hmmm.



posted on Mar, 13 2014 @ 10:01 AM
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reply to post by Hellas
 


Hospitals attract sickness.

After all, that is where sick people go to get help? The book "Hot Zone" explored this. The author explained that in an outbreak the hospitals are the first place to be compromised because that is the first place people gravitate towards when they come down with it.

Weird like that. Once they announce an outbreak of something, its already too late. Could play havoc with trying to contain the further spread of any disease from index cases.

People with money and insurance can avoid this, the rest of us are in the emergency area waiting for hours.

In a plague outbreak stay away from health centers. They will be quarantined. So will you if you go.

Sorry if off topic, just musing about the "hospital" being the focus of outbreaks.



posted on Mar, 13 2014 @ 11:06 AM
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intrptr
reply to post by Hellas
 


Hospitals attract sickness.

After all, that is where sick people go to get help? The book "Hot Zone" explored this. The author explained that in an outbreak the hospitals are the first place to be compromised because that is the first place people gravitate towards when they come down with it.

Weird like that. Once they announce an outbreak of something, its already too late. Could play havoc with trying to contain the further spread of any disease from index cases.

People with money and insurance can avoid this, the rest of us are in the emergency area waiting for hours.

In a plague outbreak stay away from health centers. They will be quarantined. So will you if you go.

Sorry if off topic, just musing about the "hospital" being the focus of outbreaks.


Getting sick by the environment is one thing. A whole other getting HIV due to sloppy handling by the staff.



posted on Mar, 13 2014 @ 12:50 PM
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reply to post by Hellas
 




Getting sick by the environment is one thing. A whole other getting HIV due to sloppy handling by the staff.

The staff didn't bring aids and hepatitis to the hospital, patients did.

Thats sets up a scenario where "mishandling" can occur. It was a mistake, right?



posted on Mar, 13 2014 @ 12:53 PM
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intrptr
reply to post by Hellas
 




Getting sick by the environment is one thing. A whole other getting HIV due to sloppy handling by the staff.

The staff didn't bring aids and hepatitis to the hospital, patients did.

Thats sets up a scenario where "mishandling" can occur. It was a mistake, right?


I said sloppy handling. And no that is not a mistake. They knew what they were doing!



posted on Mar, 13 2014 @ 07:54 PM
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reply to post by rickymouse
 





So, I wonder how long this practice was going on.


How long and in how many Hospitals..



posted on Mar, 14 2014 @ 12:45 AM
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reply to post by Hellas
 


In reality the most dangerous place to go is to the hospital. What with M.R.S.A. , and hep-c. You are more likely to leave the hospital much sicker than you were when you got there.

That being said we now have our government trying to shove health care down our throats. I haven't been to the hospital since 1992 , and I wont be going there any time soon. I feel bad for those people who don't have a choice.


edit on 14-3-2014 by Diisenchanted because: correction



posted on Mar, 14 2014 @ 08:17 AM
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reply to post by Diisenchanted
 


It is bad enough when you have to go to the Hospital. But being there because of something minor and leaving with a death sentence, is not something that we should expect.



posted on Mar, 14 2014 @ 08:21 AM
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As usual, I'm betting no one will end up in prison over this.



posted on Mar, 14 2014 @ 05:16 PM
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doubletap
As usual, I'm betting no one will end up in prison over this.


Not that it would change anything for the victims, but it would make an example.



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