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RCAF F-18 replacement program the gift that keeps on giving

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posted on Nov, 25 2021 @ 10:54 PM
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The Canadian government has been trying to replace their F-18A/B aircraft for several years now, and about the only thing they've done is provide hours of entertainment for the people watching. In 2015, when Justin Trudeau took office, the planned purchase of F-35As was canceled due to cost concerns, and Trudeau said that the Canadian government would never buy the F-35. At one point, they planned to buy F-18E/Fs from Boeing as an interim measure, but then Boeing went to the WTO about the (now) A220 undercutting their 737 sales through unethical measures. So instead of buying Rhinos from Boeing, they bought worn out F-18A/Bs from the RAAF, as the Australian's retired them, again delaying the replacement program.

Recently, they opened bidding and the initial competitors were going to be the Rafale (Dassault), Typhoon (Airbus/EADS), Gripen (SAAB), F-35A (Lockheed), and the F-18E/F (Boeing). Dassault decided not to enter the Rafale because of requirements of close interoperability with US aircraft. Just before the bids were opened, the RFP was rewritten, causing EADS to withdraw completely, resulting in the F-35, Gripen, and F-18 being the only entrants, with selection to be in the spring timeframe. But in the latest twist, sources within the Canadian government are saying that Boeing's entry, the F-18E/F doesn't meet requirements for the program. This is going to almost guarantee that the service will, again, get the F-35A.


Boeing has been told that its bid to replace Canada’s aging CF-18s with a new fleet of the American company’s Super Hornet fighter jets did not meet the federal government’s requirements.


Three sources from industry and government say the message was delivered Wednesday as the other two companies competing for the $19-billion contract — U.S. defence giant Lockheed Martin and Swedish firm Saab — were told they met the government’s requirements.

The three sources were all granted anonymity because they were not authorized to discuss these matters publicly.

globalnews.ca...



posted on Nov, 26 2021 @ 03:48 AM
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Perhaps they should revive the Avro Arrow


Cheers



posted on Nov, 26 2021 @ 09:16 AM
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As I recall, a very big requirement when all this began was having a twin-engine plane. Now Canada has dropped all the twin-engine planes from contention. Seems like we are just being leaned on by Lockheed and the USA. (plus a little petty payback to Boeing thrown in for good measure)



posted on Nov, 26 2021 @ 09:32 AM
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a reply to: discordantone

Single engine planes are just as reliable and safe as twin engine planes. The requirement for two engines, because of long flights over open areas, no longer applies. The MTBF for engines has gotten insane.



posted on Nov, 26 2021 @ 09:43 AM
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a reply to: Zaphod58

Thanks for that.
I am no military buff but did remember that discussion of twin vs single engine back at the beginning of the process so it seemed odd to be left with just the single engine options. Makes more sense now
edit on 26/11/21 by discordantone because: typo fix



posted on Nov, 26 2021 @ 09:56 AM
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a reply to: discordantone

The F100-PW-229, after the Engine Enhancement Package is installed sees the time between overhauls increase from 4,300 cycles (engine start through any condition of flight to shut down) to 6,000 cycles. That's an increase of every seven years to every 10 years. There was a CFM56 engine on a 737 that went 50,000 hours on wing, and was only removed because it hit a required inspection and had to be.



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