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Because I Am Always Reading And Watching Videos

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posted on Jul, 15 2021 @ 11:34 PM
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It should come as no real shock that by chance I came across a book on Camping and Woodcraft published in 1906. What is interesting was the chapter on gear. It could have easily been written today including speaking out military surplus items such as tent shelters and mess kits. Also worth noting is that the old two compartment plate/frying pan combo is much older than I thought and dates back to at least the Spanish-American War (Teddy Roosevelt and the Rough Riders up San Jain Hill may have had them).

Also worthy of mentioning is small sewing kits, candles, smaller more practical knives and tomahawks rather than batoning wood (which is a modern habit that is pet peeve of mine) is specifically mentioned. It also details should it be necessary to do so (or even with your tomahawk—all about the handle removal and replacement), that wooden wedges should be used after the initial start.

The chapter on tents included at home waterproofing techniques. And discussed screen techniques with cheesecloth or light weave muslin. And using rainflies of waterproofed material suspended above common cloth canvas. Mattressing ideas (notably absent from 60’s, 70 and even 80’s books). Discussion on the pros and cons of cots and other elevated sleeping platforms including a hammock.

It will be interesting to see if it addresses some other primitive arts in the hunting and fishing sections. But it already mentioned 22LR “Pocket Rifles” (which are long barreled pistols with a removable wire shoulder stock making it pretty much a short barrel rifle) which were legal at the time. You could easily substitute an AR-7 made by Henry today.

But for those that want to go digging:

THE BOOK OF CAMPING AND WOODCRAFT
A GUIDEBOOK FOR THOSE WHO TRAVEL IN THE WILDERNESS
BY HORACE KEPHART
Copyright, 1906, by
THE OUTING PUBLISHING COMPANY, NEW YORK



posted on Jul, 15 2021 @ 11:59 PM
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I gave my mess kits to my granddaughter, they like cooking on the campfire. I'm not going anywhere, I have the ability to supply food for the table right here at my house in the country. We are prepared for almost everything except a tornado or forest fire, we have the ability to pack up quickly and go to the daughters in case of a forest fire.



posted on Jul, 16 2021 @ 01:06 AM
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a reply to: Ahabstar

I've been putting together a few bug out bags, medkit needs a few items, like a scalpel and stitch thread, and I'm accumulating lots of dry beans and rice...with everything I've got...no way I can haul it on foot, I need to lose 200 lbs of chub and even though I've lost weight and feel better, I've got a long long way to go.

I guess I need to brush up on hot wiring vehicles. In case crap hits the fan before I get my own wheels.



posted on Jul, 16 2021 @ 01:10 AM
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a reply to: Ahabstar

Now you need to go practice it...



posted on Jul, 16 2021 @ 04:11 AM
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a reply to: Ahabstar

Is this it?

archive.org...

Mr. Kephart has a few things on the archive.



posted on Jul, 16 2021 @ 06:42 AM
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a reply to: Chalcedony

Sorta. Your link contains an updated and expanded version by the author. He says as much in the preface. All of which were based upon his articles for Field & Stream and Outdoor magazine.



posted on Jul, 16 2021 @ 07:02 AM
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a reply to: Xtrozero

I lived without electricity for the better part of a year. I also lived in an apartment for eleven years that didn’t receive TV signals. As kids, we made a lot of things for entertainment. And we never slept in a tent. I guess for me, it all goes back to reading My Side of the Mountain, and saying I need to be able to do that.

Living in a log cabin in the woods would be a step up in some regards to certain parts of my life.



posted on Jul, 16 2021 @ 11:29 AM
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originally posted by: Ahabstar
a reply to: Xtrozero

I lived without electricity for the better part of a year. I also lived in an apartment for eleven years that didn’t receive TV signals. As kids, we made a lot of things for entertainment. And we never slept in a tent. I guess for me, it all goes back to reading My Side of the Mountain, and saying I need to be able to do that.

Living in a log cabin in the woods would be a step up in some regards to certain parts of my life.


All I got to say is I'm a boomer and that explains alot...lol

First 40 years was a manual analog world, with three decades of military. Saying that though I do camp at times in a tent I'm not a big outdoors guy. I do fear what would happen if a city like LA lost it power grid for a month...I think people would turn to catabolism in a week...lol

But have you ever tried to make your own soap, skin a deer and make sausage, collect edible plants in the forest, make coal, build a solid shelter etc etc... These things take some skill and practice.
edit on 16-7-2021 by Xtrozero because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 16 2021 @ 12:26 PM
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a reply to: Xtrozero

Made buckeye soap. But never a bar of lye soap from extracting lye from ash and mixing rendered fat and water.
There may be some evidence of a shelter here and there after decades of abandonment.
Never made sausage nor hunted so never processed game. Yes, I can watch it a billion times but it doesn’t count until I do it.
Fishing, snares and dead falls plenty of that. And I still snack on passing edibles while walking in the woods and fields.
Never owned a glue gun, but had more pitch sticks than most people have lit wood matches.
Cooking with a fire is an art. Most guys have trouble with figuring out a pop tart and a toaster. Also why you never hedge a bet on one fish always try for two. You can eat them both if need be.
Made plenty of shepherd’s slings, knapped blades, fire hardened spears, bows and arrows, cordage (and get better each time).

Your most important tool is not your knife, tent, canteen, cordage, etc. Most important tool is your feet followed by eyes, head and hands. Blind, two broken arms and crazy out of your head you still might walk out on your own.

End of the day, experience beats knowledge hands down. Knowing something isn’t as valuable as successfully doing something. You build a shelter and provide for the old lady that preserves meat by smoking it. Or can hand you a jug of apple cider vinegar in exchange for a pillowcase full of apples. The kid with the high score on Mario Cart...not so much. You hand him the pillowcase and point out the apple tree.



posted on Jul, 16 2021 @ 12:38 PM
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Just downloaded the book from amazon kindle.
Great addition to my collection of survival books.
a reply to: Ahabstar



posted on Jul, 16 2021 @ 01:00 PM
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originally posted by: Ahabstar

Made plenty of shepherd’s slings, knapped blades, fire hardened spears, bows and arrows, cordage (and get better each time).



I have always been interested in forging. Living in Japan for 5 years I was fascinated with the art there, and maybe in my retirement years I'll play around with it.



posted on Jul, 16 2021 @ 02:20 PM
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Nice thread - got me thinking about refocusing & spending some time researching the skills of the outdoorsman/woman, I really do have a romantic vision of whether I (with a significant disability) might one day be able to craft a little cabin (with a little help from my friends) with a patch of land extending into some forested/hill areas, just to have a place to retreat to when the nonsense of the modern world gets to be too much.

The way things are going with the whole scam of the corona-control system, I've joined a couple of local 'resilience communities' & 'stand in the park' Telegram groups, which are crammed with useful links to information, and also provide for an immediate network of people who are already involved in generating off-grid communities in an area of the countryside fairly local to myself, as well as a multitude of people who have observed the corona-scam control system as it develops, who have perceived the deceptions employed, who are now angry & wanting an opportunity to consider living in a different way/ empowering others in society to resist the burgeoning control system..

They organise what are known as 'stand in the park' events, where peaceful resistance against government coronavirus restrictions is employed, where COVID rules are peacefully ignored - all in public parks in various localities around the nation (in the UK). There are now hundreds of these real-life 'support/ protest groups' for all sorts of people who share the common ideal that the current mainstream narrative is utter nonsense, these are people who can see the dangers on the horizon, who have started putting various plans in place to develop plots of land to situate independent-yet-networked 'resilient communities'.

It's actually now my 'Dream', something I've distilled in thought experiments in recent months, to establish innovative companies based around my longstanding entrepreneurial product design activities, which can interface with the modern world & compete with mainstream companies, all the while also offering a visible counter-narrative connection into these resilient communities. Essentially, building small productive companies which specialise in one or two products, which have their back end firmly established in the resilient community landscape, with the front doors open to the modern world - a sort of hybrid approach to remaining technically savvy/ keeping the technological lights on - despite involving both self & others in communities which are deliberately insulated from the madness of the modern dystopian narrative.

I don't agree with those who claim we should be totally off-grid, living in dungarees & bare feet exclusively tending an allotment all the hours that God sends. That's fine for many people, it's a peaceful & satisfying lifestyle for some - and indeed resilient communities require that some people commit to that sort of activity & gainful employment within the community. However, I'm determined to demonstrate that we do not need to become Luddites who shun technology & totally disengage with the modern world/ with the processes that generate the strength to operate as distinct & politically viable entities, all of which comes with accumulated wealth through business endeavours. I think there's a balance to be found, if we act quickly to generate these interfacing companies which can offer employment to community members, as well as providing for significant resources to be used at least in part to really help the community to firmly establish its roots & develop technological resilience, as well as the back-to-nature resilience many people are seeking. Both are important if we are to continue to convince others that there is a better approach to living one's life than accepting servitude under the boots of the NWO master puppeteers.

After 40 years of searching in this life, I have identified the above proposal as what I truly consider to be a reasonable stab at accomplishing my life's purpose on this Earth. I believe that if we can insulate these communities (which are springing up as cooperatives, all over the UK) in a technological sense, also generating paid employment for community members, as well as financial resources that can be partially fed back into community projects & reinvested in the businesses, then we have the potential to remain an active participant in the better aspects of the modern world (access to technological resources & finance, appropriate medical care, etc), while simultaneously adopting a simpler lifestyle which is dignified & comfortable, more enjoyable in a holistic sense, spending time in nature, with one's family & with dozens of people whom we know & love, dotted around the particular community/ communities we call Home.

Despite the appeal of a simple community life where material wealth isn't held up as some sort of badge of honour, I do believe in the right to personal wealth if one has worked for it, with the caveat that one must be ethical in assisting the effective growth of the community 'organism' which has sheltered & supported your plans as they were being implemented, naturally conducting oneself righteously in other areas of life. As long as we're creating opportunities for other community members, and helping to voluntarily maintain some of the community projects, then we are within our rights to ensure that our life within the community is comfortable (though I would never want to look like a flash harry, putting my needs & desires completely over & above those of other community members).

I do believe that we can continue to exist in a hybrid relationship with the rest of the world, indeed by our very presence in the marketplace demonstrating that there is an alternative to the nightmare which is currently unfolding in practically all nations on Earth. By developing technologically competent small businesses, we can actually help to establish new communities around the country as more people sign up to live in a different manner (which they are doing in their dozens each & every day). I believe the future is an exciting place, despite the obvious worries & concerns about just how the NWO masters will want to react to 'resilient communities' in general.

I'm hedging my bets that they might just leave us alone, at least for a while, if we're hurting no-one & paying our taxes on time, etc.

The Dream comes first, before we can determine how exactly the NWO will choose to interface with us.

Cheers,


FITO.





edit on JulyFriday2117CDT02America/Chicago-050031 by FlyInTheOintment because: spelling, clarification



posted on Jul, 16 2021 @ 03:27 PM
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originally posted by: EdisonintheFM
a reply to: Ahabstar

I've been putting together a few bug out bags, medkit needs a few items, like a scalpel and stitch thread, and I'm accumulating lots of dry beans and rice...with everything I've got...no way I can haul it on foot, I need to lose 200 lbs of chub and even though I've lost weight and feel better, I've got a long long way to go.

Took me all of 3 months to lose 85 lbs, and I've been trying to lose it for the last 30 years.

Search on Intermittent Fasting, and watch every video by Dr. Jason Fung (then branch out from there). I dove right in to OMAD (one meal a day). They key is simple. NO SNACKING. NONE. ZILCH. NADA.

For the first time since I was 30, I'm at my ideal weight and have been here for over a year.

If you do it right, the weight will just fall of until you've lost 95% or so of it, then the rest comes off slowly.



posted on Jul, 16 2021 @ 04:42 PM
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a reply to: bluesman462002

If you think of The Wild West (1850’s - 1912) or even Little House on the Prairie (1870’s - 1890’s), this book was published within a generation of when pioneers and mountain men were still at large. And while dated in places due to period materials, (powdered Alum and Lead mixed as a waterproofing paste) the use of wax treatment is very similar to how to do a DIY silnylon tarp.

The gear fits with Dave Canterbury‘s 5 C’s (later 10 C’s) lists. I’ll give him credit for popularizing the mnemonic...but he by no means created it. And I’d rather stay out of all the baggage there as no one poked this bear. The old “My name is Paul and that is between you all.” is my position on it. I will say that this grill shares an incredible amount of detail to something I explained some 25 years ago after making one.

So far no one has gone with my long term survival in a business suit video series idea. So there is that still.



posted on Jul, 16 2021 @ 06:33 PM
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originally posted by: tanstaafl

originally posted by: EdisonintheFM
a reply to: Ahabstar

I've been putting together a few bug out bags, medkit needs a few items, like a scalpel and stitch thread, and I'm accumulating lots of dry beans and rice...with everything I've got...no way I can haul it on foot, I need to lose 200 lbs of chub and even though I've lost weight and feel better, I've got a long long way to go.

Took me all of 3 months to lose 85 lbs, and I've been trying to lose it for the last 30 years.

Search on Intermittent Fasting, and watch every video by Dr. Jason Fung (then branch out from there). I dove right in to OMAD (one meal a day). They key is simple. NO SNACKING. NONE. ZILCH. NADA.

For the first time since I was 30, I'm at my ideal weight and have been here for over a year.

If you do it right, the weight will just fall of until you've lost 95% or so of it, then the rest comes off slowly.



Thank you for that.

I've told intermittent fasting was beneficial in MANY ways. I've done it on occassion but it's harder to do now than it was years ago.

Appreciate the info!



posted on Jul, 16 2021 @ 07:03 PM
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If you can find them the foxfire series of books cover everything that was done
by old timers.
Soap making cabin building etc.
I think they are hard to come by these days.

p.s. i was wrong they have them on amazon

a reply to: Ahabstar


edit on 16-7-2021 by bluesman462002 because: (no reason given)



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