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The Meaning of God in the Hebrew Bible

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posted on May, 12 2020 @ 04:53 PM
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a reply to: Astrocyte

Who's to judge...

I'm not Jewish, but I'm farily familiar with it mythologies, I know Yahweh does mean "I am", but it never goes into detail about it though (from what I know anyways). I do think the God of Israel is a good depiction of reality(character wise), even though its a subjective one, just without the innuendo's.

Only thing I've ever found close to it was the concept of the Gnostic Demiurge or Platos Artisan which was based on another cultures belief, only without alot more innuendos...alot more...

Long story short, it basically about an Omnipotent Creator being blind to its origins, and the higher heavens. While believing himself to be the only one of his kind I guess, claiming to be the only God( he kind of not wrong ether) all the while, being completely ignorant of the higher realms that are the source of his being.

It symbolic of the mind, albeit a foolish one really, who doesnt second guess or question themselves. Even though it doesnt offer much explanations on the nature of existence, it does make one question this sort of stuff.

Not much of god, right? I mean what idiot would claim that God was an idiot, and works for a higher power and doesnt know it.
And if I'm not mistaken ether, certain sect of Judaism adopted the idea, I think they they call themselves Kabbalists.




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posted on May, 12 2020 @ 09:52 PM
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a reply to: Astrocyte

12 represents reality (aka 12 tribes) in which our brain is part and parcel. Thus I'd argue that we cannot be 12 and say we understand the love that 13 represents. That's superficial love. True love can only be experienced as 13. In achieving 13, the aspect of 13 dissolves into 1.

Deuteronomy 6:4 Hear, O Israel: HaShem our God, HaShem is one.

So what I was trying to hint at. The aim is not to know, but to experience the knowing. Otherwise its all for naught (pun intended).



posted on May, 14 2020 @ 10:16 PM
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originally posted by: Specimen88
a reply to: Astrocyte

... I know Yahweh does mean "I am", but it never goes into detail about it though (from what I know anyways).

The name is a form* of a Hebrew verb ha·wahʹ (הוה), meaning “to become,” and actually signifies “He Causes to Become.” Thus, God’s name identifies him as the One who progressively fulfills his promises and unfailingly realizes his purposes. (*: the causative form, the imperfect state)

At Exodus 3:13-16 God himself explained the meaning of his name to his faithful servant Moses. When Moses asked about God’s name, God’s reply in Hebrew was: ʼEh·yehʹ ʼAsherʹ ʼEh·yehʹ. Some translations render this as “I AM THAT I AM.” However, it is to be noted that the Hebrew verb ha·yahʹ, from which the word ʼEh·yehʹ is drawn, does not mean simply “be” (or “being” as Astrocyte puts it). Rather, it means “become,” or “prove to be.” The reference here is not to God’s self-existence but to what he has in mind to become toward others. Therefore, the New World Translation properly renders the above Hebrew expression as “I SHALL PROVE TO BE WHAT I SHALL PROVE TO BE.” Or: “I Will Become What I Choose to Become.” (as its primary rendering in the Study Edition) Rotherham’s translation renders those words: “I Will Become whatsoever I please.” So Jehovah can become whatever is needed in order to fulfill his purposes, and he can cause to happen whatever is required with regard to his creation and the accomplishment of his purpose. Jehovah thereafter added: “This is what you are to say to the sons of Israel, ‘I SHALL PROVE TO BE has sent me to you.’”​—Ex 3:14, ftn. Or: “I Will Become . . .” (primary rendering again).

That this meant no change in God’s name, but only an additional insight into God’s personality, is seen from his further words: “This is what you are to say to the sons of Israel, ‘Jehovah the God of your forefathers, the God of Abraham, the God of Isaac and the God of Jacob, has sent me to you.’ This is my name to time indefinite, and this is the memorial of me to generation after generation.” (Ex 3:15; compare Ps 135:13; Ho 12:5.)

Concerning the other subject of the meaning of the Hebrew words for “God” (as the subject is phrased in the title of this thread but not the OP which focuses more on God's personal name, which is not to be confused with the word “God”):

Among the Hebrew words that are translated “God” is ʼEl, probably meaning “Mighty One; Strong One.” (Ge 14:18) It is used with reference to Jehovah, to other gods, and to men. It is also used extensively in the makeup of proper names, such as Elisha (meaning “God Is Salvation”) and Michael (“Who Is Like God?”). In some places ʼEl appears with the definite article (ha·ʼElʹ, literally, “the God”) with reference to Jehovah, thereby distinguishing him from other gods.​—Ge 46:3; 2Sa 22:31; see NW appendix, p. 1567.

At Isaiah 9:6 Jesus Christ is prophetically called ʼEl Gib·bohrʹ, “Mighty God” (not ʼEl Shad·daiʹ [God Almighty], which is applied to Jehovah at Genesis 17:1).

The plural form, ʼe·limʹ, is used when referring to other gods, such as at Exodus 15:11 (“gods”). It is also used as the plural of majesty and excellence, as in Psalm 89:6: “Who can resemble Jehovah among the sons of God [bi·venehʹ ʼE·limʹ]?” That the plural form is used to denote a single individual here and in a number of other places is supported by the translation of ʼE·limʹ by the singular form The·osʹ in the Greek Septuagint; likewise by Deus in the Latin Vulgate.

The Hebrew word ʼelo·himʹ (gods) appears to be from a root meaning “be strong.” ʼElo·himʹ is the plural of ʼelohʹah (god). Sometimes this plural refers to a number of gods (Ge 31:30, 32; 35:2), but more often it is used as a plural of majesty, dignity, or excellence. ʼElo·himʹ is used in the Scriptures with reference to Jehovah himself, to angels, to idol gods (singular and plural), and to men.

When applying to Jehovah, ʼElo·himʹ is used as a plural of majesty, dignity, or excellence. (Ge 1:1)

At Psalm 8:5, the angels are also referred to as ʼelo·himʹ, as is confirmed by Paul’s quotation of the passage at Hebrews 2:6-8. They are called benehʹ ha·ʼElo·himʹ, “sons of God” (KJ); “sons of the true God” (NW), at Genesis 6:2, 4; Job 1:6; 2:1. Lexicon in Veteris Testamenti Libros, by Koehler and Baumgartner (1958), page 134, says: “(individual) divine beings, gods.” And page 51 says: “the (single) gods,” and it cites Genesis 6:2; Job 1:6; 2:1; 38:7. Hence, at Psalm 8:5 ʼelo·himʹ is rendered “angels” (LXX); “godlike ones” (NW).

Just some of the basics.
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posted on Jun, 6 2020 @ 06:46 AM
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Conscience And Consequence (Of The Self)...

Consequence And Conscience (Of The Truth)...

That Is What God Is In My Book.



posted on Jun, 6 2020 @ 09:49 AM
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a reply to: whereislogic

There are a bunch of interpretations for it though, and we be here for days arguing about it. Yhey do kind of contradict each other to a certain extent, due to their root meanings, and dialects because of syncretism.

The word El may have belonged to the Caanites an meant God, while for the Hebrews it could of meant Lord. Elhoim is hinted to have been originally used to name the Caanite pantheon similar to Annuaki. It then later became a name possibly due to the story of Elijah/Elias(whose name supposed to mean "Yahweh is my God/Lord") when there was a contest in A. Israel between the usage of Baal or Yahweh.

J/Iehovah is english translation of latin, and is synonymous with Yahweh. I'm even inclined that Arabic usage of Allah might give some insight to it, although albeit, through a different dialect long before Mohammed an Islam came to be.



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