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How BAD does the weather have to be...

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posted on Feb, 17 2014 @ 08:41 AM
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reply to post by Jakal26
 


I tip my hat to you,and thank you for trying to keep roads clear and safe. Our plow operators here got dealt a harsh blow when the garage containing three plows and salt trucks,burnt to the ground. We were running a skeleton crew to begin with due to budget cuts. Were it not for the generosity of other communities,we'd still be buried since the last storm. It bothers me greatly that you aren't given proper training for your job. That should change.




posted on Feb, 17 2014 @ 09:16 AM
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I hope it doesn't have anything to do with electromagnetic weather modification...
edit on 9Mon, 17 Feb 2014 09:23:35 -0600America/Chicago14America/ChicagoMon, 17 Feb 2014 09:23:35 -0600 by greyer because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 17 2014 @ 09:42 AM
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greyer
I hope it doesn't have anything to do with electromagnetic weather modification...
Ummm,doubt it. But if so,would explain the flock of geese I saw flying north just before the storm hit. Odd that,for sure.



posted on Feb, 17 2014 @ 12:23 PM
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At our workplace we had a "Snow Day" provision that provided for paid time off in the event of snow for (I believe) two separate incidences per year. This was a "no questions asked" policy, but management did declare "Snow Days" for everyone once in awhile and actually close the place down, in which case everyone got paid for time scheduled to work. This did not count against the above "Snow Days."

It was interesting to see employees' reactions. One woman in my department would leave if she saw ONE snowflake in the sky. She would panic, literally, and rush out of the workplace, she was so frightened of driving in the snow. Although middle-age she did not have a lifetime of driving experience and only learned after her divorce. So she self-selected out, which for her was the right thing to do.

Other people would put chains on their RWD cars and drive to work no matter what, perfectly competently, without a real care in the world except the snow slowed them down.

At one level I kind of roll my eyes at the "ease" of which people would run for cover. I wonder of they would act like that if they did not get paid. And I guess I wish people were a little more competent about dealing with inclement weather. On the other hand I have to respect people who know their own level of competence and opt out for their own selves--and others. That also seems a sensible solution.

But the fact is we don't get much snow so we can "afford" to be as lenient as described above, surely a liberal policy. If we were in Detroit or Duluth or Missoula, surely those places need to get on with life even if there is two feet of snow on the ground.



posted on Feb, 17 2014 @ 01:05 PM
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reply to post by schuyler
 


Aha!
A very good point that I had not first considered. I suppose it is not entirely up to the discretion of the employer,but the comfort level of the employee as well. It's true that some have no issue with driving in bad weather,while others do. That would be a difficult thing to manage on an individual employee basis,especially for a larger business. I would think at the very least an employer would exercise caution with an employee driving in the company car though,if nothing else. Bottom line to me is,if the police say stay off the roads,your boss should expect you to stay home.






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