76-Zentner the Nazi Atomic bomb found at Espelkamp in 1945

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posted on Jan, 18 2014 @ 12:56 AM
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Espelkamp... Nazi Germany's secret Atomic Bomb factory

On 4th April 1944 a unit of the British 8th Army fought surprisingly stubborn resistance at a small town 74 kilometres west of Hanover. Their mission was to capture a large ammunition dump there, but what a young NCO name Sanders found in an underground bunker sent shock-waves through Allied Governments.

After fighting subsided entry was gained to the bunker and inside the British officer found 40 Uranium centrifuges, a functional working nuclear reactor and the 76-Zentner a 3.8 tonne Atomic Bomb inscribed “To be fired only by order of the Fuhrer.”

This discovery still remains classified and concealed by the British Government. Historians still falsely maintain the Nazis never succeeded in developing a working nuclear reactor, yet there it was at Espelkamp.

Today Keith Sanders and his friend, a German co-researcher named Dirk Finkemeier struggle with subtle totalitarian censorship in both the British and American media to share information about this secret Nazi Atomic Bomb factory.

Here is what Keith Sanders wrote to me about Espelkamp:

"My father was in the battle group which fought their way in through 2,000 SS defenders and captured the factory at 3.10 pm on Wednesday 4th April 1945. He was the source of the alarm, which led to "Operation Teardrop" by the USN 15/16 April sinking U-1235 and U-880, they missed U-857.... I have an IWM photo of him driving his little unit of RAOC ammunition technicians off a class40 raft on 24th March 1945. His boss Major Roy Tucker (standing rear on raft with greatcoat) was still alive (84) in 1998 for my father's efforts he was awarded a DSO! Only awarded to officers, as lesser ranks are considered too stupid to ever merit such an accolade."

Dirk Finkemeier also wrote to me:

"His father discovered in April 1945 the German Atomic Bomb Factory, called MUNA Luebbecke in Espelkamp. On 4th April 1945 the British found 40 centrifuges and an underground reactor...Around that wood called Lange Horst, south of Espelkamp was also buried an atomic bomb, called 76- Zentner Bomb (the IG Farben Bomb). It weighed 3,8 tonnes the same like "Little Boy." In 2011 Prof.Dario Biocca from Peruggia University published an article about MUNA Espelkamp in La Republica."

The nuclear reactor (possibly Gottow IV) is buried beneath the North end of Lange Horst wood an area which is now encroached by public housing development. On January 3rd, 1945 the British brought Prof Werner Heisenberg to the site to interrogate him about the Nazi project. Nowhere in our history books or his autobiography did Heisenberg ever mention this.

I wanted to share this information with others at ATS because both these men have effectively been silenced in the UK media.
edit on 18-1-2014 by sy.gunson because: layout correction




posted on Jan, 18 2014 @ 01:07 AM
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sy.gunson
On 4th April 1944 a unit of the British 8th Army fought surprisingly stubborn resistance at a small town 74 kilometres west of Hanover


The reason we have never heard about this is the D-day landings did not take place until 6th June 1944.

Also the 8th Army were no where near Hanover, ['the Eighth Army was covertly switched from the Adriatic coast in April 1944 to concentrate all forces, except the V Corps, on the western side of the Apennine Mountains alongside the US Fifth Army in order to mount a major offensive with them and punch through to Rome. This fourth Battle of Monte Cassino was successful with Eighth Army breaking into central Italy and Fifth Army entering Rome in early June']

The 8th Army only got as far as Austria....

So again all we just have is a silly made up story trying to claim the Germans were ahead of the Allies in developing the atomic bomb.



posted on Jan, 18 2014 @ 01:11 AM
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reply to post by sy.gunson
 


One of the people who gave information on the German bomb was Douglas Dietrich with Revolution Radio... This is an interesting confirmation. He further stated that a deal was made with the Nazis for processed Uranium at the end of the war which was then sent by submarine to America which was then used in the US bombs. DD has said that America did not have enough material for the bombs at that time.

Thanks for sharing this historical reference..
edit on 18-1-2014 by R_Clark because: Grammar



posted on Jan, 18 2014 @ 01:18 AM
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reply to post by hellobruce
 


I think you must separate what the Op wrote and what Sanders wrote to the Op...

Sanders states 3.10 pm on Wednesday 4th April 1945....

and seems to be British...
edit on 18-1-2014 by R_Clark because: Details



posted on Jan, 18 2014 @ 01:19 AM
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R_Clark
Sanders states 1945...


Still does not change the fact that the 8th Army was nowhere there....



posted on Jan, 18 2014 @ 01:21 AM
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reply to post by hellobruce
 


Sanders seems to be part of a British unit.... not the 8th... nor does Sanders mention the 8th..

The Op should weigh in here.... certainly, I am only referencing the Ops statements.
edit on 18-1-2014 by R_Clark because: Details



posted on Jan, 18 2014 @ 01:23 AM
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interesting info there i will look into it scary how the natzis got so ahead of everyone in so short a time if they had 10 more years the world would be a different place



posted on Jan, 18 2014 @ 01:50 AM
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hellobruce

sy.gunson
On 4th April 1944 a unit of the British 8th Army fought surprisingly stubborn resistance at a small town 74 kilometres west of Hanover


The reason we have never heard about this is the D-day landings did not take place until 6th June 1944.

Also the 8th Army were no where near Hanover, ['the Eighth Army was covertly switched from the Adriatic coast in April 1944 to concentrate all forces, except the V Corps, on the western side of the Apennine Mountains alongside the US Fifth Army in order to mount a major offensive with them and punch through to Rome. This fourth Battle of Monte Cassino was successful with Eighth Army breaking into central Italy and Fifth Army entering Rome in early June']

The 8th Army only got as far as Austria....

So again all we just have is a silly made up story trying to claim the Germans were ahead of the Allies in developing the atomic bomb.



My father was at Arromanches on 6 June 1944 so I am well aware of D-day thanks. I made a typo

This is the actual text of the email sent to me 4 January 2014 which accurately states the date in 1945:




Happy New Year to you and your family.2010 the STERN published my research about Nachterstedt Desaster...We work together with Keith Sanders, England.His father discovered in April 1945 the german atomic bomb factory, called MUNA Luebbecke in Espelkamp.The ten Farm Hall german scientists, Luke Heisenberg, Hahn, etc.were brought Januar 1946 to that plant to show the scientists what (the americans and) British found on the 4.th. April 1945.They Foundation 40 centrifuges and an underground reactor...Around that wood( Wood Lange Horst) there could be buried one other atomic bomb, called 76- Zentner Bomb( the IG Farben Bomb).The weigh is 3,8 to. Same like" Little Boy".Prof.Dario Biocca from Peruggia University published 2011 an article about MUNA Espelkamp in La Republica...HAve gar the possibility to show hin documents.
edit on 18-1-2014 by sy.gunson because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 18 2014 @ 01:56 AM
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reply to post by hellobruce
 


yeah I think he said British not American 8th. I have no knowledge of troop movements back then but if it was British hopefully the story is true because it sounds very believable and just cool to know a part of history that was lied about and changed



posted on Jan, 18 2014 @ 03:12 AM
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If the Nazi's had a bomb, they'd have used it the instant they lost Stalingrad and the Russians started pushing them back.



posted on Jan, 18 2014 @ 03:14 AM
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reply to post by sy.gunson
 


Although some of your details are possibly a bit skewed, the main gist rings true. My father was in the 51stHD/153 IB/5/7th Gordon Highlanders, (other brothers in other divisions, and one uncle who was an interpreter during the Nuremberg trials) and i recall many stories along these lines, and many things that have been suppressed or sanitized since. Anything related to WW2 or Nazis, i only believe my relatives first or possible second hand accounts. In most instances think 180 degrees of what is presented as history.



posted on Jan, 18 2014 @ 03:39 AM
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Agit8dChop
If the Nazi's had a bomb, they'd have used it the instant they lost Stalingrad and the Russians started pushing them back.


Is it not possible in this hypothetical situation that the program was finished after that battle? Say they were 6 months from being able to launch then. Stalingrad was in 43, the "bomb" was "found" in 45. Some time to work with there



posted on Jan, 18 2014 @ 04:44 AM
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reply to post by sy.gunson
 


From what I have read over the years, the germans where at times ahead of the british but by the end of the war they were over twelve months behind in development of the atomic bomb, the raids of pinamund where essential in preventing there heavy water production, Britain was actually the leading player and gave all our research and scientists to america where openheimer took the credit as he was the lead US researcher, America was nearly two years behind at that point but was boosted with british scientific research, now today britain is a backwater but then we where leading scientific research in a number of fields and were still the largest economy on the planet if the empire was taken as a whole, We also invented the jet engine and though the germans independantly (though one of there scientists may have heard of the british one) invented there own version, the lack of rare alloys made the german engines burn out and they were less powerful than frank whittles work but mr whittle had ten years on them (would you believe the RAF top brass actually turned his engines down in the late 1930's because they were too fast for aeriel combat) Oh and another thing the method of mixed unit tactics was demonstrated in the 1920's by a british leutenant and his superiors called it a waste of resources (The truth was they liked there own control and whom was in charge, the general, the air marshal or the admiral), the germans had civilian observers whom took the lesson home though under the treatis of versai they were prohibited from re arming as you know but they were quick studies and if there was one advantage to there state it was that they when rearming built a state of the art army as far as strategy and tactics were concerned, did you know the Polish army was far larger but had only a hand full of WW1 biplanes, hardly any machine guns and a very large cavalry with out dated cannon.



posted on Jan, 18 2014 @ 04:46 AM
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reply to post by Sremmos80
 


Yeah sure why not....
But they didn't use it did they!

They were slicing the necks of their own people in the back alleys of Berlin, in the moments leading up to the surrender...

if such a bomb existed, it would have been used!



posted on Jan, 18 2014 @ 05:09 AM
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It is still a Hot Topic in Germany.

Now it is a bit quite but i remember a few Article in 2004-06.

The Third Reich: How Close Was Hitler to the A-Bomb?


The United States needed 125,000 people, including six future Nobel Prize winners, to develop the atomic bombs that exploded over Hiroshima and Nagasaki in 1945. The uranium enrichment facility alone, including its security zone, was the size of the western German city of Frankfurt. Dubbed the Manhattan project, the quest ultimately cost the equivalent of about $30 billion.

In his new book, "Hitler's Bomb," Berlin historian Rainer Karlsch claims Nazi Germany almost achieved similar results with only a handful of physicists and a fraction of the budget. The author writes that German physicists and members of the military conducted three nuclear weapons tests shortly before the end of World War II, one on the German island of Ruegen in the fall of 1944 and two in the eastern German state of Thuringia in March 1945. The tests, writes Karlsch, claimed up to 700 lives.

Der Spiegel

Atomforschung: Historikerstreit über Hitlers Bombe
Der Spiegel

edit on 18-1-2014 by Human0815 because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 18 2014 @ 05:12 AM
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reply to post by Agit8dChop
 


Did'nt they?? Are u sure of that?

en.wikipedia.org...
ian.kluft.com...
perrya.hubpages.com...
www.dailymail.co.uk...
en.metapedia.org...

U still believe in Saddams WMD's too?

Just askin the questions for open minds.



posted on Jan, 18 2014 @ 05:33 AM
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reply to post by CovertAgenda
 


What was it that was used on the Kurds then?



posted on Jan, 18 2014 @ 06:19 AM
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Whether true or not, I read a short account of where the British, in 1940, rescued an amount of French Uranium, and then transported it over to America for 'safe keeping' and it was later used in the Manhattan project.



posted on Jan, 18 2014 @ 06:38 AM
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reply to post by sy.gunson
 


I don't know if the following is relevant, but it is interesting. According to a history of the Manhattan Project, it cites Einstein's famous letter of August 2, 1939 to Roosevelt. The last paragraph of that letter throws a bit of light on this argument of who started what when.:

"I understand that Germany has actually stopped the sale of uranium from the Czechoslovakian mines which she has taken over. That she should have taken early action might perhaps be understood on the ground that the son of the German Under-Secretary of State, von Weizsaker, is attached to the Kaiser-Wilhem-Institute in Berlin where some of the American work on uranium is now being repeated."

On March 9, 1942, V. Bush wrote to Roosevelt that the project was well underway:

"The technical aspects are in the hands of a group of notable physicists, chemists, and engineers, as noted in the report. corresponding British organization is also indicated. The work is under way at full speed."

"...The subject is rapidly approaching the pilot plant stage. I believe that, by next summer, the most promising methods can be selected, and production plants started. At that time I believe that the whole matter should be turned over to the War Department."

Given that is was a proper letter to the President at that time about an urgent matter, it seems an accurate benchmark for dating fairly exactly the process of development in the US.



posted on Jan, 18 2014 @ 06:43 AM
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reply to post by hellobruce
 

I think you will find it was the British/Canadian Battle groups that helped liberate the Lower Saxony areas off Germany

Before pushing on to find Bergen Belsan cosontration camps.

Included in the TAOR was a town called Celle nr Hanover west Germany, The was a factory under the guise of making silk parachutes actually producing isotope 233?

Check out silk factory Celle.

Or "A curious Nazi occult tale" here on ATS, SOXMIS is the OP and I have some input using my old name foxhoundone



When the Alsos team failed to find information in Paris, they turned their focus directly on Germany. On March 22, American troops began crossing the Rhine River in force, and by the next day reached Aachen. April 17 found Smyth in Celle, in southern Germany near Stuttgart, visiting a factory that made parachute silk. Smyth took a small piece of camouflage as a souvenir and also came across a tantalizing clue: at the factory he discovered a centrifuge used to concentrate fissile uranium-235 from uranium-238.

edit on 18-1-2014 by foxhound2459 because: (no reason given)





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