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Aliens could be common on free-floating ‘rogue planets’ without suns

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posted on Jan, 17 2014 @ 05:30 AM
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off-topic post removed to prevent thread-drift


 




posted on Jan, 17 2014 @ 06:42 AM
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I always like to wonder about stuff as messed up as that.


Like what if there are "Sun Dragons", hehe, that swim around on the surface of the Sun?
They could be only the size of a cat, so it would be really hard to detect them.

Imagine how long it would take to develop technology to prove such a thing existed.

Or what about "Ice critters" or similar concepts?
"Floaters" in the gas giant's atmospheres, etc.

They are all far fetched sure, especially animals that live in plasma, but I think until we venture out there and look around we just won't know for sure. The possibilities seem pretty wide open when we have no actual first hand knowledge.



posted on Jan, 17 2014 @ 07:33 AM
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Biigs
Energy is some what circular, it gets transmitted, converted by life forms like us. Plants, animals, its all energy from the sun that flows around us even out fossil fuels were created by the sun at one point.

with no sun theres no free energy to absorb and convert so what exactly would a subterranean alien life form use to sustain itself?

Heat can also come from within the planet. Earth has a molten core, remember? It's molten not because of the Sun's heat, but because of gravitational pressure from when our planet was forming.



posted on Jan, 17 2014 @ 07:45 AM
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reply to post by wildespace
 


I'm sorry, but I usually take things that start or end with "scientists say" with a pinch of salt.

They are often quite ignorant.



posted on Jan, 17 2014 @ 07:54 AM
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nerbot
reply to post by wildespace
 


I'm sorry, but I usually take things that start or end with "scientists say" with a pinch of salt.

They are often quite ignorant.

Ok then, who should we listen to, with regards to space? Hoagland? McCanney? Haramein? Or is absolutely anyone qualified to produce hypotheses and theories about the universe, irregardless of their education and expertise?



posted on Jan, 17 2014 @ 08:33 AM
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Well if its moving, it would have a tail, and have gone comet. Not everything that we think is a planet, is one. Some are artificial, possibly like the GMO mercedes that grew from a seed, and in space would keep on growing.



posted on Jan, 17 2014 @ 09:53 AM
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reply to post by LightAssassin
 





Just as likely then that our planet may also contain life down that deep underground?


It's more than likely. It is fact that bacteria and fungi have been observed 5-6 miles down in mines, living in cracks of hard rock.

Sorry, Aliens referred to in the OP are highly likely to be microscopic, not intelligent reptilians or something humans could interact with.



posted on Jan, 17 2014 @ 09:58 AM
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reply to post by nerbot
 


Well said.

I find that most people are absolutely ignorant of how awesome my opinion is. Particularly people that waste their time with books and calculators.

Did you check out that dude curled up inside the moon? Damn. Wouldn't that get uncomfortable?



posted on Jan, 17 2014 @ 10:09 AM
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wildespace
................
How can a lifeform survive in vacuum and without any kind of source of energy or heat?

It also needs enough protection from cosmic rays which asteroids don't provide. Not sure about comets, but rogue planets should provide enough. This is why they say life doesn't survive between stars, at least on asteroids and probably comets. The only way really is to travel via rogue planets.

Comets do however transport pre-life materials necessary for it to thrive. New research shows collisions produced by comets impacting a planetary body also produce many of these needed materials. I've also read about research showing these complex organic compounds are also probably produced by cosmic rays impacting the comet while it's traveling through cosmic space.

Some references (1st is cosmic rays, 2nd one is collisions):
news.softpedia.com - Comets Can Create and Carry the Building Blocks of Life, Researchers Found...
www.spacedaily.com - Experiment confirms life may have come to Earth from outer space...
edit on 17-1-2014 by jonnywhite because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 17 2014 @ 10:23 AM
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muzzleflash
I always like to wonder about stuff as messed up as that.


Like what if there are "Sun Dragons", hehe, that swim around on the surface of the Sun?
They could be only the size of a cat, so it would be really hard to detect them.

Imagine how long it would take to develop technology to prove such a thing existed.

Or what about "Ice critters" or similar concepts?
"Floaters" in the gas giant's atmospheres, etc.

They are all far fetched sure, especially animals that live in plasma, but I think until we venture out there and look around we just won't know for sure. The possibilities seem pretty wide open when we have no actual first hand knowledge.

Well don't act surprised:
www.newscientist.com - Plasma blobs hint at new form of life...

Note these blobs don't inherit information (no dna apparently).
edit on 17-1-2014 by jonnywhite because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 17 2014 @ 10:26 AM
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The Earth could actually be hollow. There is evidence that this may be true. Shamballa was spoken of in Tibet. It was always known as a place either at the top of the world, or inside it. Admiral Richard Byrd supposedly flew into the interior of this planet.



posted on Jan, 17 2014 @ 11:35 AM
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reply to post by jonnywhite
 


I did not know about that, hah.
I totally am surprised , I cannot help it, that's off the hook.
Ty for link jonny, very funny coincidence.



posted on Jan, 17 2014 @ 11:41 AM
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reply to post by wildespace
 


Interesting hypthesis, and as you know life (microscopic multi celled simple worm like forms) has been found down to nearly 4 miles beneath the surface of the earth, chemosynthetic like the hypothesis suggests.
Then there is the possabillity that any long duration civilisation may want to leave the planet of it's birth in order to maintain it's own survival and such exo planets may actually offer stable environments that would be preferable to such as the earth which is a volatile molten ball with a thin unstable floating crust around an unpredictable sun which regularly suffers extinction level event's and is not a solid platform for a long duration civilisation.

edit on 17-1-2014 by LABTECH767 because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 17 2014 @ 03:37 PM
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reply to post by wildespace
 


That could be likely - especially considering the changes to the probability due to the number of planets increasing and the realization (finally) that life could evolve from other circumstances than the exact ones Earth has.

We already are working on, and finding, planets with similar environments to Earth. This is the first time I have heard of scientists expanding their horizons to take into consideration other types of life.

For example - there is at least one moon in our own solar system that has an ocean (as in H20) hidden underneath ice. That water also happens to be warmed by geothermal activity.



Wikipedia: Europa

It also turns out that comets especially are good at seeding life on planets, because they are made of ice and have a lot of the building blocks for life, and also pass through zones of high radiation when they near suns.



Wikipedia: Panspermia

So with this theory about comets, you don't even have to have the components for life. A comet could plop life down onto a planet in the middle of nowhere, and as long as there are the right components there, it could evolve.
edit on 17pmFri, 17 Jan 2014 15:38:44 -0600kbpmkAmerica/Chicago by darkbake because: (no reason given)

edit on 17pmFri, 17 Jan 2014 15:39:02 -0600kbpmkAmerica/Chicago by darkbake because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 17 2014 @ 05:01 PM
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Tearman

wildespace

gardener
What about life just drifiing in space? It would be way more dispersable than being confined to one single planet - its not like planets last forever, but space, space last alot longer than particular solar systems

How can a lifeform survive in vacuum and without any kind of source of energy or heat?

And while exposed freely to the radiation of space without protection. Especially while their internal error-correcting machinery would have to come to a halt for lack of resources available in that environment.

But then again a life form could have evolved some kind of shielding. If they can survive the radiation, then it would be mostly a matter of going into some kind of hibernation. I know that's not the correct word. What do you call it when life forms "go to sleep" for dozens or hundreds of years only to wake up again when they thaw out? Would the radioactive decay going on inside their own bodies be enough to extinguish their life during the millions of years they would drift about in empty space? What about spontaneous chemical decomposition--does that happen?


Well... there is the Tardigrade that can survive at absolute zero and in open space. While it evolved on Earth, and can only survive for a limited time under those extreme conditions, it does show what is possible...



posted on Jan, 18 2014 @ 06:25 AM
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reply to post by wildespace
 


Based on this theory it would mean just about any planet discovered could conceivably harbor life.

So much for the goldilocks criteria...
Which opens up the question - does life truly need water in order to exist? Absent being geologically active to the extent of producing enough heat to keep water in liquid form without a sun, could life develop without reliance on water?



posted on Jan, 18 2014 @ 01:03 PM
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LightAssassin
reply to post by wildespace
 


Just as likely then that our planet may also contain life down that deep underground?


No holes have been drilled so deep that there's no evidence of life at the bottom of them. At least not yet.

I think, however, that life as we know it couldn't exist above some (unknown to me) certain temperature. The deeper you go, of course, the hotter it gets.

Harte



posted on Jan, 18 2014 @ 01:09 PM
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AliceBleachWhiteFor a fun exercise of imagination in odd, I recommend a read of Integral Trees, by Larry Niven where a gas torus orbits a Neutron star where the gas is breathable, and Humans have colonized it to live in a near zero-G microgravity environment, making their homes on some of the gigantic plant life that's developed free-floating in this gas torus.

Granted, that's imagination, and we've no direct observations of anything such, but, it's not outside the constraints of any of our current models.


Imagination, yes, but as the water vapor cloud mentioned shows, the idea of a gas surrounding a gravity well is shown to be true.

Given enough vapor, radiant emission and the right gravitational potential, it is well within the bounds of science for a liquid ocean to be orbiting a mass somewhere out there.

Harte



posted on Jan, 18 2014 @ 02:40 PM
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Just a random thought, but what if one were to apply the "hollow Earth theory" to these rogue planets?

What if the sun was actually in the core with the crust being a protective shell (shield) for the inner environment? Sounds wild, but so is everything else we've been discovering in space. Black holes in the center of galaxies yet not sucking in the galaxy. Box shaped galaxies when we've been taught that is impossible. Countless discoveries that go against traditional teachings.

Or what if they are Deathstars?

Just random thoughts to get the wheels going.



posted on Jan, 18 2014 @ 02:49 PM
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reply to post by wildespace
 


Shhh people will think about Nibiru all over Again ... Dam U Scientist.... LOL!



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