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Women in American Literature.

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posted on Nov, 28 2013 @ 09:13 AM
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What types of roles did women have in literature or in society in general after World War I but before World War II? I think there was a substantial increase in jobs for women that were traditionally men's jobs.




posted on Nov, 28 2013 @ 09:21 AM
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reply to post by RobFox
 


Probably portraying them as sexual beings accelerated in the flapper years, at least in America. The films certainly did so, leading up to the Hays Office crackdown in the early and mid 1930s. Books and films would likely have also shown the competence of women outside of the kitchen, barn, and other essential rooms.



posted on Nov, 28 2013 @ 02:41 PM
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The first female literary character that comes to mind when I think of American literature published between WWI and WWII is Scarlett O'Hara. Gone with the Wind was published in 1936. I'm not sure there was a female protagonist who was ever quite so headstrong and determined to forge her own destiny before. The story arc took her from a flirtatious, clueless girl to a competent, financially successful woman who took care of her family in the aftermath of war. Unfortunately, most other characters were stereotypes, and the depiction of slavery was quite sterilized. I don't think the book has aged well. The stand-out aspect of the novel was Scarlett, and I think she changed the way people viewed female characters.



posted on Nov, 28 2013 @ 02:51 PM
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reply to post by RobFox
 


I'm guessing this is for a school paper?



posted on Nov, 30 2013 @ 11:24 AM
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I'm in a class by myself so I have no classmates to discuss.



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