Frustrated at the slow pace of Space exploration....

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posted on Nov, 19 2013 @ 10:03 PM
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Here's the title of a recent article on Space.com. "High-Tech VASIMR Rocket Engine Could Tackle Mars Trips, Space Junk and More"

They talk about the V.A.S.M.I.R. as if it's new technology; but it's not new, it's been around for about 30 years. If we had've developed the technology and used it we could be out farther than Voyager by now. Chang Diaz and Ad Astra are just now going to be testing the technology on the ISS soon.

Why the baby steps? Why take so long to do something? Why are TPTB still talking about V.A.S.M.I.R. like it's an emerging technology even after almost 30years? I know the initial Space Race was because of the Colr War, but over the years we've learned that there are so many benefits to Space exploration, far too many benefits to list in this post.

I'm frustrated.




posted on Nov, 19 2013 @ 10:16 PM
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reply to post by lostbook
 


The Powers That Were are Broke, for one thing.

And space is rather difficult to survive in, when you're any distance at all from the one planet we know of that's conducive to staying alive.

Turns out near - absolute zero, oxygen-less, meteor thick, deadly radiation filled space isn't the romantic place you seem to think it is.

Besides, last time we went anywhere, all they could think of to do was play golf.



posted on Nov, 19 2013 @ 10:18 PM
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reply to post by lostbook
 


I won't elaborate, but if you would allow yourself to seriously study the history of UFO phenomena on this planet, and the story of the English hacker Gary McKinnon, and the fairly recent reports of the strange black triangles seen around the US and the UK for the last couple of decades, then, just maybe, you could gain a perspective that is far and away from what you have been told to believe about space exploration and the equipment used.

I must repeat as I have done constantly: The space shuttle was discontinued after a service life of about thirty years and they didn't have a replacement. Why would that be the case when the US has been the leader in the "space race" since before the Soviet Union fell apart. Did we simply give up and let Japan, India and china take up the reins, or do we have something better in full operation?



posted on Nov, 19 2013 @ 10:43 PM
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reply to post by lostbook
 


When we're ready we'll break free of our bonds and depart, we'll put all our collective energy into the quest with the same energy that aroused a nation led by JFK but it won't happen until we're common with our goals. Our Sci-Fi depicts wars with space fairing aggressors while we kill each other for control of resources and power in the here and now.In the grand scheme we are still infantile and perhaps, suicidal. I too am frustrated with our progress beyond our cradle but an infant is caged for good reason perhaps. I don't hold much faith, sadly, in our future as peaceful, well intentioned explorers of space and beyond. We just never seem to understand the idea that we are one with all that is so we separate ourselves from the very thing that would ensure our survival...Understanding.



posted on Nov, 19 2013 @ 10:47 PM
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reply to post by lostbook
 


The biggest hurdle for government space exploration has long been a lack of public support when it comes to actual funding. Another issue is that the average NASA project takes 10-15 or more years to complete and a lot of people have a really hard time getting excited about something that could happen a generation from now.

I've witnessed it firsthand on many occasions when I've tried to do my own space exploration proselytizing--I'd often get responses like, "There are just too many things we should be fixing here on Earth to worry about going to Mars."

It seems like the beginnings of commercial space exploration are always "just around the corner" and it's certainly frustrating waiting for that first space port to open but I believe the current crop of visionary-types like Musk, Branson and Page/Schmidt have the resources and drive to kickstart commercialization. Just this year two asteroid prospecting companies opened up and I think if they can actually identify and name some asteroids with high enough precious metal content, that could be a big deal.



posted on Nov, 19 2013 @ 10:51 PM
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reply to post by lostbook
 


I'm more than frustrated, I believe that we have been intentionally delayed from going into space, it makes no sense at all that even with the incorrect assumptions resulting from our first steps from the 60s (regarding lack of economic possibilities and even resources to sustain life outside Earth), that we are not only now attempting to replicate what we supposedly had already done with archaic tech. but that our aim is so limited (Mars) and mostly due to pressure to newcomers to the space age. Some stuff has been done, some evolution has been made in space tech but the important stuff has been continually been defunded or simply prevented to come about. The longer it takes the more expensive it will be, the less resources we will have and the more risks our civilization incurs...



posted on Nov, 19 2013 @ 11:03 PM
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lostbook
Here's the title of a recent article on Space.com. "High-Tech VASIMR Rocket Engine Could Tackle Mars Trips, Space Junk and More"

They talk about the V.A.S.M.I.R. as if it's new technology; but it's not new, it's been around for about 30 years. If we had've developed the technology and used it we could be out farther than Voyager by now. Chang Diaz and Ad Astra are just now going to be testing the technology on the ISS soon.

Why the baby steps? Why take so long to do something? Why are TPTB still talking about V.A.S.M.I.R. like it's an emerging technology even after almost 30years? I know the initial Space Race was because of the Colr War, but over the years we've learned that there are so many benefits to Space exploration, far too many benefits to list in this post.

I'm frustrated.

Many issues.

#1. Funding
#2. Funding
#3. Funding

NASA is the one developing the tech, they literally have to invent things for their missions. Now some other organizations may have some claim to fame.... NASA actually invents things that work.

NASA hasn't had the luxury of some other space organizations that built a lot of junk that didn't work. If they did that, their anemic budget would be killed.

Measure twice, cut once.



posted on Nov, 19 2013 @ 11:34 PM
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No space race + Less funding = Less exploration.
This stinks as I grew up during the Apollo era and had my toy Saturn 5 sitting beside me for every launch. I miss the enthusiasm for space exploration from back in those days.



posted on Nov, 19 2013 @ 11:40 PM
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reply to post by theantediluvian
 


Yea the majority food stamp abusers feel like that 16billion NASA budget would be better spent on 47 million Food stamp customers. I mean are talking about a $28 per month raise here.

Im not sure privitation of space will ever help the average space enthusiast. Corporations generally the only interest is in profits. Just like the History Channel really shows history. Just like Verizon really wants you to have that new cellphone every two years, just sign this contract right here that just about destroys all your rights as a consumer. Just like Disney World a wonderful place full of adventure for everyone with a few hundred dollars and fast enough legs to walk to points of interest before the park closes. Just like Time Warner really wants you to have that home phone your never gonna use even though you just want their alleged highspeed internet.

Its pretty sad NASA is one of the few government funded efforts that is run correctly. By far the most transparent. Easily the most innovative. After learning this the majorities reaction is, NASA is liars and hiding the truth wasting money!



posted on Nov, 19 2013 @ 11:40 PM
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reply to post by theantediluvian
 


I think you pretty much nailed it.

We aren't in space because there is really nothing up there we've found worth value yet. Once there is though, I imagine it will be similar to the Gold Rush in California.

I suppose it will start with mining, which will be followed by some sort of shipping followed by various colonies either in space or on a surface, its all dependent on profit.

Nobody really want's to go in debt for science, even if it is important.



posted on Nov, 19 2013 @ 11:42 PM
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Aliensun
reply to post by lostbook
 


I won't elaborate, but if you would allow yourself to seriously study the history of UFO phenomena on this planet, and the story of the English hacker Gary McKinnon, and the fairly recent reports of the strange black triangles seen around the US and the UK for the last couple of decades, then, just maybe, you could gain a perspective that is far and away from what you have been told to believe about space exploration and the equipment used.

I must repeat as I have done constantly: The space shuttle was discontinued after a service life of about thirty years and they didn't have a replacement. Why would that be the case when the US has been the leader in the "space race" since before the Soviet Union fell apart. Did we simply give up and let Japan, India and china take up the reins, or do we have something better in full operation?


Well, with the advent of "space tourism" they aren't going to be able to hide any sort of secretive space program for long. I doubt Virgin Galactic customers will be required to sign a NDA before boarding.

As mining operations commence in the next 20-40 years, more and more civilians will be "off world". If there's anything hidden up there (such as advanced space craft/UFO's) -- the world will soon know.



posted on Nov, 19 2013 @ 11:44 PM
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I share your frustration OP.

I would love to see a bill pass that triples space funding but it's too bad that the pensions of retired federal workers triumphs the need for funding space development. You know, ignoring the fact that federal workers are paid so well already but the pension is the plan B for poor planning.

With SS, it astonishes me that anyone feels entitled to pensions working for the feds. These funds should be put to space. Why don't we have a moon base already?



posted on Nov, 19 2013 @ 11:48 PM
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As a member of the "space race" generation I can remember Mercury, Gemini and Apollo missions very well along with all the hope of follow-on missions to Mars and beyond.

During that time I benefitted from an education driven by these hopes, heavy on science, math and critical thinking, one I am grateful for to this day.

With cold war possibilities always threatening to become a hot war situation it was my fervent hope mankind could get off this planet and make viable colonies on the moon and Mars as a species survival mechanism.

Space-Lab and Shuttle programs were a huge disappointment in their near earth parochialism and severely limited scope and intent. Basically a huge waste of money for extremely limited capability.

By now we should have a viable moon colony with manned Mars exploration spurring all nations to aspire to go forth and explore.

Instead very short-sighted people took over things and royally screwed-up things where we are all stuck on this same rock facing extinction together as we'd never went into space in the first place.

So short sighted it make me ill.

Kinda like shared tribal suicide if I'm asked. Others may say stupidity.



posted on Nov, 19 2013 @ 11:57 PM
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Two words: No money.

If space exploration is to go any further it needs to be privately funded, but try convincing all the billionaires out there to get on board.

I could imagine the response "Do I look like a charity to you? SECURITY!"



posted on Nov, 20 2013 @ 12:17 AM
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I'm disappointed and frustrated as well.

On a conspiracy note, something to think about; In the Ateroid Belt between Mars and Jupiter, we have asteroids falling (mostly) into three composition types:

Individual asteroids within the asteroid belt are categorized by their spectra, with most falling into three basic groups: carbonaceous (C-type), silicate (S-type), and metal-rich (M-type)


Some of these Asteroids, from a resource perspective, just one of them, if brought to Earth could completely de-value many rare-earth elements and minerals, making commodities like Gold, Silver, Diamonds, Platinum, and many others worth about as much as their gum-ball machine imitations.

In a world economy where such resources are rare and the wealthy can benefit from such rarity, having easy access to such abundant resources might not be seen as a 'good' thing to them financially.

That's a bit conspiratorial, but, we've a fair historical precedent of wealth influencing politics and policy back to the very first monetary economies.
It may be a bit far-fetched, but, not too much so that the wealthy don't want certain species of wealth related benchmarks devalued to the point of near worthlessness by anyone bringing home a diamond encrusted asteroid veined with enough Gold, Silver, Platinum and other resources crash those markets.



On a less conspiratorial vector, as has been mentioned, Space outside our atmosphere, and even more so outside the protective envelope of our planetary geomagnetic field, isn't friendly.
Roughly HALF the probes we've attempted to send to Mars, for instance, have been lost for various and sundry reasons, and those are JUST machines.
Attach Human lives to an absolute dependence on those machines for survival and the cost in lost life would not be pretty.




posted on Nov, 20 2013 @ 05:55 AM
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We are, unfortunately, addicted to the Earth.

We cannot survive without the oxygen rich air we're addicted to.
We cannot survive without the water that we are addicted to.
We cannot survive without the sustenance that we 're addicted to.

No other places we know of currently, have these things and we cannot take enough of them with us to go anywhere serious.

It's a bit like being on a small island in the middle of the ocean and all you have is a single leaky dinghy. Do you stack it with supplies and head off, hoping to find new land? Or sit there, pondering if it exists. knowing you'd never make it?

Besides, we're already in space.

I'd love to have the ability to venture out and explore. But it's all so deadly out there..



posted on Nov, 20 2013 @ 06:45 AM
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I wish when it comes to space governments would do this collectively.
Individual countries simply don't have the money to "think big" when it comes to space.
The EU collectively sort of puts the ESA on a par with NASA in terms of funding potential (I say this only as the EU has a similar GDP to the USA) but we need NASA, the EU, China, Russia, and anyone else to pool together resources or it will remain as it is.

We are one world, broken & fragmented as we are space could be the the one thing that brings us together.



posted on Nov, 20 2013 @ 07:17 AM
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reply to post by lostbook
 


it all boils down to the same thing...money...space exploration is just too expensive and money is in the hands of the wrong people.

For example...Based on what it cost India for their mission to mars, Real Madrid F.C could have gone there TWICE...Instead they bought Gareth Bale.



posted on Nov, 20 2013 @ 08:43 AM
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I know how you feel. I was hoping we'd be farther along by now.
So far the only progress of much I've seen is the added giga bytes to a friggin laptop. I remember when they all were like 1-4 gb, now we see them at 6-8.

Not the progress I care much about though...seriously at least solve the cancer problem a little faster? :[

I want space travel...visits to other planets! Friends that are different races from our own
It would be so cool.



posted on Nov, 20 2013 @ 08:48 AM
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If funding is always the problem, as it comes from tax revenue, how about taxing company's that have made a profit from space technology?

Makes sense right?





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