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This is the amazing Lockheed Martin SR-72—the space Blackbird

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posted on Nov, 15 2013 @ 12:09 AM
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reply to post by Zaphod58
 


anything else?




posted on Nov, 15 2013 @ 01:44 AM
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chrismg
understandable as the us air force and navy train more unmanned uav operators than fighter and bomber pilots.


IMO it is unlikely to need a ground linked pilot - it will be autonomous.



posted on Nov, 15 2013 @ 12:01 PM
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A new article on SR-72:www.nationaldefensemagazine.org... FPosts

I m not really optimist for the futur of the Sr-72 it look to me that the USAF is not ready to finance this plane. They want to protect the three priority programs F-35, KC-46, LRS-B. But may be it will be a mistake to finance the LRS-B, in my opinion may be it will be better to finance a game changing plane like SR-72 for the futur instead a low risk but classic plane like the LRS-B surely a SR-72 will be the very superiority in a futur denial theater. I realy hope that the SR-72 will not be another poster child.



posted on Nov, 15 2013 @ 01:22 PM
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reply to post by darksidius
 


We probably don't have to worry about funding since it most likely already exists and has for some time now.



posted on Nov, 15 2013 @ 02:51 PM
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reply to post by Sammamishman
 


with with mostly costing millions of dollars and the government sucking as it is they might only build 5 or less.



posted on Nov, 15 2013 @ 02:54 PM
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reply to post by chrismg
 


They don't need a massive fleet of them. One aircraft will give a lot of coverage.



posted on Nov, 15 2013 @ 03:05 PM
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Ok I agree with that a fleet of 4 or five will give a very advantage, if it exist now its enough to do the job
surely Lockheed don't give us a news like that with just a great pictures I think its surely more than a demonstrator since 7 years. If it be operational soon where it can be in station Edwards ?



posted on Nov, 15 2013 @ 03:06 PM
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reply to post by darksidius
 


They can easily fly it out of Groom. Or forward deploy them to old SR-71 locations hidden around.



posted on Nov, 15 2013 @ 04:50 PM
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Yes Groom is more bigger than ever it must be easy to find a place for the beast, and may be a day in futur Groom can become a more operational base instead of a super secret site because now its well known by public , and a day USAF will have to find a more secret place I imagine.



posted on Nov, 15 2013 @ 05:34 PM
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reply to post by darksidius
 


Area 51 is still very secretive, and a secure place to test aircraft. There's only been a few times that anyone's caught a test on video and even then all you see is a light moving through the air with a chase plane.

Also there's only certain parts of the year that you can climb tikkaboo peak, so just because the base itself isn't a secret it's still very good at keeping it's testing secret.



posted on Nov, 15 2013 @ 08:51 PM
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Zaphod58
reply to post by darksidius
 


They can easily fly it out of Groom. Or forward deploy them to old SR-71 locations hidden around.


There are "hidden" SR-71 bases (other than Groom)?? Where are those?



posted on Nov, 15 2013 @ 09:23 PM
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reply to post by Aloysius the Gaul
 


Not so much hidden, as they're a little out of the way, where they can launch, and it wouldn't be obvious to the entire world they were launching a super secret project.



posted on Nov, 15 2013 @ 11:38 PM
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reply to post by Zaphod58
 


IIRC they used about the same amount of runway as a B-52



posted on Nov, 16 2013 @ 01:10 AM
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reply to post by darksidius
 


it could be also still be in construction and storage at the large hangar at area 51.for now



posted on Nov, 16 2013 @ 06:38 AM
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reply to post by Aloysius the Gaul
 


Anything around 8,000 feet or so would work.



posted on Nov, 16 2013 @ 07:17 AM
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There is the large hangar, and another possibility the hangar 18 to home SR-72 in Groom. Since all time the Skunk Works ISR projects are housing in Groom, there is no reason to change with the new project. And if no SR-72 in the large hangar what else?



posted on Nov, 16 2013 @ 07:19 AM
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reply to post by darksidius
 


I'm gonna go with Intelgurl's sources on this one. She had a habit of being right a lot more than she was wrong (I don't think I ever saw her wrong). The timing on that hangar is right for it to be for this program.



posted on Nov, 16 2013 @ 11:01 AM
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Yes she start a very good thread on the Blackswift in 2007, and a lot she said at this time seem right now. Great respect for her, and thread like that are very interseting for the hobbiyst like us, the same on this thread with people like you Zaph



posted on Nov, 16 2013 @ 01:04 PM
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reply to post by Zaphod58
 


I'm not convinced that the new (circa 2007) big hangar at Groom is being used by Lockheed Martin. There is some (albeit tenuous) circumstantial evidence that it was used by Northrop Grumman, a company that has been reportedly working on a classified ISR platform and possibly a new bomber. The hangar has been there about five years now, and there are preparations underway for a "new" program moving into South Base at Edwards, which will require enhanced security similar to that associated with the B-2 test operations at South Base in the early 1990s. South base is home to the Global Power Combined Test Force (bombers and ISR), so these preparations have the flavor of something "black" moving into the "gray" world.

The SR-72 is a cool concept but it sounds like it is still a long way from producing a flyable demonstrator. I recently spoke with someone who has been with the Skunk Works a long time, and asked if the SR-72 would ever be more than just a "paper airplane." He felt confident that the design goals were achievable but admitted that there are still significant hurdles with regard to the propulsion system. The company is trying to leverage lessons learned from the HTV/FALCON program that produced a lot of good data on materials, propulsion, and technology maturation. Ultimately, I expect funding to be a greater obstacle than technological challenges. I'm not holding my breath waiting to see it fly.



posted on Nov, 16 2013 @ 01:08 PM
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reply to post by Shadowhawk
 


There is a rumor that due to training issues, as well as other groups interest something very interesting is about go go light. That's probably what is going to be at Edwards. I can't wait because what I've heard about it is very cool. Although from what I understand it's not flying out of Groom, but other locations.
edit on 11/16/2013 by Zaphod58 because: (no reason given)



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