Psychology question

page: 1
5
<<   2 >>

log in

join

posted on Oct, 14 2013 @ 08:47 AM
link   
For any resident psychology types:

What is the name of a "condition" where by the patient "de-values" or under values their self?




posted on Oct, 14 2013 @ 08:51 AM
link   
You didn't give much info. Lots of 'issues' have that.

One common one -
Borderline Personality Disorder?

Borderline personality disorder (BPD) is a mental disorder characterized by disturbed and unstable interpersonal relationships and self-image, along with impulsive, reckless, and often self-destructive behavior.


There are others of course.
I hope you aren't trying to self diagnose over the internet.
If you think there is a problem with someone ... have them see a professional in person.



posted on Oct, 14 2013 @ 08:59 AM
link   
reply to post by tanka418
 

I think this "condition" is commonly known as "righteousness". 2nd line.



posted on Oct, 14 2013 @ 09:03 AM
link   
I think that is referred to as social conditioning. Those at the top of society do not want us to have enough confidence to challenge them. Certain colognes and perfumes can make us submissive through pheromone actions. Ad hominem techniques are also utilized. If a person cannot operate within the boundaries of this conditioning, they are said to have some sort of mental condition.

This condition you talk about used to be called a lack of self confidence. People who talk about others behind their back use this to make themselves feel equal or better than others. It is alright to discuss things with other people but you should talk to your friends about their problems instead of talking behind their backs. It is not easy to speak to your friends about their problems, most cannot see their flaws and will get mad. So subtle well thought out hints often work the best. Constructive criticism is good, we should consider what people say and see if our consciousness needs adjusting instead of getting mad right away.
edit on 14-10-2013 by rickymouse because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 14 2013 @ 09:12 AM
link   
reply to post by tanka418
 


Hm, there's depression, all the way to body dismorphic disorder.



posted on Oct, 14 2013 @ 09:17 AM
link   

tanka418
For any resident psychology types:

What is the name of a "condition" where by the patient "de-values" or under values their self?


It's called collectivism and it's apparently virulently contagious.




posted on Oct, 14 2013 @ 10:46 AM
link   
Dysthymia?


Symptoms

The main symptom of dysthymia is a low, dark, or sad mood on most days for at least 2 years. In children and adolescents, the mood can be irritable instead of depressed and lasts for at least 1 year.

In addition, two or more of the following symptoms will be present almost all of the time that a person has dysthymia:

Feelings of hopelessness
Too little or too much sleep
Low energy or fatigue
Low self-esteem
Poor appetite or overeating
Poor concentration

People with dysthymia will often take a negative or discouraging view of themselves, their future, other people, and life events. Problems often seem more difficult to solve.

Treatment

There are a number of things you can try to improve dysthymia:

Get enough sleep.
Follow a healthy, nutritious diet.
Take medicines correctly. Discuss any side effects with yourdoctor.
Learn to watch for early signs that your dysthymia is getting worse. Have a plan for how to respond if it does.
Try to exercise regularly.
Look for activities that make you happy.
Talk to someone you trust about how you are feeling.
Surround yourself with people who are caring and positive.
Avoid alcohol and illegal drugs. These can make your mood worse over time and impair your judgment.

Medications are often effective for dysthymia, though they sometimes do not work as well as they do for major depression, and may take longer to work.

Don’t stop taking your medicine on your own, even if you feel better or have side effects. Always call your doctor first.

When it is time to stop your medicine, you and your doctor will slowly reduce the dose instead of stopping suddenly.

People with dysthymia may also be helped by some type of talk therapy. Talk therapy is a good place to talk about feelings and thoughts, and to learn ways to deal with them. Types of talk therapy include:

Cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT), which helps you learn to be more aware of your symptoms and what makes them worse. You will be taught problem-solving skills.
Insight-oriented or psychotherapy, which can help people with dysthymia understand factors that may be behind their depressive thoughts and feelings.

Joining a support group for people who are having problems like yours can also help. Ask your therapist or health care provider to recommend a group.
edit on (10/14/1313 by loveguy because: feels important



posted on Oct, 14 2013 @ 11:20 AM
link   
You could be describing what Sam Vaknin describes as inverted narcissism. He is a world famous self confessed narcissist and expert on all things narcissistic.




posted on Oct, 14 2013 @ 12:29 PM
link   
reply to post by tanka418
 


Teenager


Really low self esteem is at the root of almost all personality disorders.



posted on Oct, 14 2013 @ 02:33 PM
link   
| wouldn't leave this query to a Resident but a full on Doctor. More info is needed for a more thorough diagnosis.



posted on Oct, 14 2013 @ 02:36 PM
link   

tanka418
For any resident psychology types:

What is the name of a "condition" where by the patient "de-values" or under values their self?


There's no one diagnosis for this. It could be anything from cultural (the way they were raised) or familial (the way the family expected them to behave) or depression or religious philosophy or even plain old personal philosophy.

It takes someone with a lot of experience treating many different emotional and mental problems to come up with a correct diagnosis.



posted on Oct, 26 2013 @ 01:05 AM
link   
reply to post by tanka418
 


There are a number of psychological conditions where one might undervalue her/himself. The most salient example would be in major depression. This could also occur in the depressive phase of bipolar disorder. Other disorders like cyclothymia (mild bipolar disorder) might also result in feelings of undervaluation/worthlessness.

Some personality disorders may also apply, for example Dependent Personality Disorder, Avoidant Personality Disorder, Self-Defeating Personality Disorder(this is listed as a disorder "under review" which means the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual doesn't consider it researched well enough to add as its own diagnosis, but some clinicians still use it).



posted on Oct, 26 2013 @ 01:14 AM
link   
See this is why I have zero faith in psychology, ask ten psychologists for a diagnosis and get ten different answers.

When that fails they send you to the psychiatrists who don't have any real answers either but they crush the problem with drugs.

IMO



posted on Oct, 26 2013 @ 01:19 AM
link   
reply to post by tanka418
 


I haven't cracked a DSM IV in a long time. And a lot of the labels are fading in my memory.

However, LOW SELF-WORTH is common in a number of psychological maladies.

And, if one posits, as I do, that MOST of the labeled categories of psychological/emotional dysfunction arise out of ATTACHMENT DISORDER . . . you could say that virtually all of them do . . . even those with intense levels of seeming supreme and extreme arrogance--which is usually--a kind of reaction formation against the deep worthlessness within.

Here's my thread on RAD:

www.abovetopsecret.com...

imho
Certainly Depression has plenty of it.
So do the character disorders.



posted on Oct, 26 2013 @ 01:28 AM
link   

Bassago
See this is why I have zero faith in psychology, ask ten psychologists for a diagnosis and get ten different answers.

When that fails they send you to the psychiatrists who don't have any real answers either but they crush the problem with drugs.

IMO


Of course, diagnosing problems of the mind and brain is very clear cut and there's no room for interpretation. It's basically like being a mechanic, just open up your skull, turn a lever here, tighten a valve there and voila, no more personality disorder.



posted on Oct, 26 2013 @ 01:36 AM
link   
Low self esteem is not a condition but a symptom that is present in almost all types of mental health disorders.
If someone you know is suffering from extremely low self esteem chances are they are suffering a lot more than just one symptom..

Thanks,
Pax



posted on Oct, 26 2013 @ 01:48 AM
link   

BO XIAN
reply to post by tanka418
 


I haven't cracked a DSM IV in a long time. And a lot of the labels are fading in my memory.

However, LOW SELF-WORTH is common in a number of psychological maladies.

And, if one posits, as I do, that MOST of the labeled categories of psychological/emotional dysfunction arise out of ATTACHMENT DISORDER . . . you could say that virtually all of them do . . . even those with intense levels of seeming supreme and extreme arrogance--which is usually--a kind of reaction formation against the deep worthlessness within.

Here's my thread on RAD:

www.abovetopsecret.com...

imho
Certainly Depression has plenty of it.
So do the character disorders.





Well done.



posted on Oct, 26 2013 @ 02:16 AM
link   
reply to post by Tetrarch42
 




Of course, diagnosing problems of the mind and brain is very clear cut and there's no room for interpretation. It's basically like being a mechanic, just open up your skull, turn a lever here, tighten a valve there and voila, no more personality disorder.


Did you forget the /sarcasm tag?

LOL.

But it keeps a lot of shrinks off the streets.



posted on Oct, 26 2013 @ 03:26 AM
link   
reply to post by tanka418
 



What is the name of a "condition" where by the patient "de-values" or under values their self?

It is a by-product of the irrationality of the conscious mind.

To name or label a so called condition (a set of behaviours/beliefs) as in the OP, is to limit the person in question.



posted on Oct, 26 2013 @ 04:05 AM
link   
I don't think you have a condition. I'm sure most of us have felt that way at some point in their lives. No one struts around in full confidence all the time all day.

People are different, difference doesn't have to mean you have a condition.





new topics

top topics



 
5
<<   2 >>

log in

join