Regarding Meteor Reports Lately, I Believe It`s Nothing Compared To What`s Still To Come

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posted on Sep, 28 2013 @ 07:09 PM
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I Hope We are lucky enough to just see a beautiful and unique show in the sky but I believe there is the chance we have, at least, a few more crashes like the one that hit Chelyabinsk in Russia, by December.

I`m far from being an expert on this subject, but I believe NASA can`t predict a lot of possible situations that may happen such as magnetic interferences and/or crashes with other asteroids in space that can change ISON trajectory and if this happens near Earth we can all be surprised without even a warning.

So, I don`t believe NASA is Lying or Hiding something. Maybe They know there are 99% chances of nothing serious happen but there still is a 1% chance of surprises coming from the fireball shower that might happen.

Here are some videos I find interesting:





What do you believe will happen ? ....Just a bright comet in the sky or a massive fireball shower that may (or not) hit Earth in unpredictable places ?

edit on 28-9-2013 by AQ6666 because: (no reason given)




posted on Sep, 28 2013 @ 07:28 PM
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reply to post by AQ6666
 


Thats so cool! The only ones i've seen so far were very small high up and despaired in seconds

A reason for chem trails? could be fought on this
maybe they cover the sky so we cant see whats going on?

or not
edit on 28-9-2013 by hknudzkknexnt because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 28 2013 @ 07:35 PM
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hknudzkknexnt
reply to post by AQ6666
 


Thats so cool! The only ones i've seen so far were very small high up and despaired in seconds

A reason for chem trails? could be fought on this
maybe they cover the sky so we cant see whats going on?

or not
edit on 28-9-2013 by hknudzkknexnt because: (no reason given)


I saw couple let night and night before. Does anyone know when it will be visible with binos or telescope from southern united States and what coordinate.

The Bot



posted on Sep, 28 2013 @ 07:35 PM
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reply to post by AQ6666
 


I`m far from being an expert on this subject, but I believe NASA can`t predict a lot of possible situations that may happen such as magnetic interferences and/or crashes with other asteroids in space that can change ISON trajectory and if this happens near Earth we can all be surprised without even a warning.
What "magnetic interferences?" While there is a very, very, very, very remote possibility that another object might collide with a comet the chance that such an event would change the orbit such that it would impact Earth is even more remote. And C/2012 S1 (ISON) will never be near Earth in the first place.




Fireballs are not necessarily the result of large objects. In fact most of them are quite small.
Comet tails are composed of small and "fluffy" meteoroids. They burn up before reaching the surface.

Based upon photographic fireball studies, cometary meteoroids have extremely low densities, about 0.8 grams/cc for class IIIA fireballs, and 0.3 grams/cc for class IIIB fireballs. This composition is very fragile and vaporizes so readily when entering the atmosphere, that it is called “friable” material. These meteoroids have virtually no chance of making it to the ground unless an extremely large piece of the comet enters the atmosphere, in which case it would very likely explode at some point in its flight, due to mechanical and thermal stresses.

www.amsmeteors.org...


edit on 9/28/2013 by Phage because: (no reason given)
edit on 9/28/2013 by Phage because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 28 2013 @ 07:36 PM
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reply to post by AQ6666
 


Why stress out or worry about things nobody can change?

Enjoy the show and hope for the best outcome.



posted on Sep, 28 2013 @ 07:36 PM
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reply to post by hknudzkknexnt
 


I`ve seen a few fireballs in the past. I can remember os 2-3 that were much bigger than the others. Not seen many this year so far.



posted on Sep, 28 2013 @ 07:38 PM
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reply to post by Phage
 


Thank you for explaining that. When I say fireball I mean every kind of meteor.

...Well, so you don`t believe the number of fireballs may increase by December ?
edit on 28-9-2013 by AQ6666 because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 28 2013 @ 07:41 PM
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reply to post by AQ6666
 

The are the same thing. A fireball is just a bright meteor.

A fireball is another term for a very bright meteor, generally brighter than magnitude -4, which is about the same magnitude of the planet Venus in the morning or evening sky.

www.amsmeteors.org...



posted on Sep, 28 2013 @ 07:45 PM
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reply to post by Phage
 


So Phage, you must be the member I most admire here. Always love to read your posts.
So you don`t believe it`s possible the number of meteor/fireballs increase in number and size by December ?



posted on Sep, 28 2013 @ 07:48 PM
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reply to post by tweetybird0428
 

...Oh, I don`t stress with things I can`t control. Agree 100% with you. However, I like to discuss these subjects and think of all possibilities



posted on Sep, 28 2013 @ 07:54 PM
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reply to post by AQ6666
 

Thank you for the compliment.

If we do pass through the dust tail of the comet it won't be until January. At that time we will pass through the area where the comet will have been in early November. Where it will have left its trail of dust.

It's not certain that we will pass through the dust tail of the comet though, it will still be above the plane of the ecliptic when it passes Earth's orbit. It could give us a nice show but since the comet doesn't seem to be living up to early hopes...we'll just have to wait and see.
edit on 9/28/2013 by Phage because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 28 2013 @ 07:56 PM
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By december, maybe.. by May 24th 2014, very much so.

www.youtube.com...

when we pass through the tail of 209P/Linear.. we will also be passing through all the trails ejected by this one from between 1809 and 1924.

May be a great time to gaze into the heavens.



posted on Sep, 28 2013 @ 07:59 PM
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reply to post by Phage
 


Once again thank you for your reply
....Well let`s hope to have a nice fireball show but only in the sky



posted on Sep, 28 2013 @ 08:01 PM
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Can anybody (Phage, perhaps?) explain to me, as well as anyone else out there wondering, how the comet could be losing 100,000lbs of dust every minute if the dust is supposedly weightless in space? Is this a calculated value using our know gravity and some sort of accurate measure of mass from the comet droppings or is this a guestimate?

How do they know how large in lbs/tons/Kg etc. this thing really is? I'm just skeptical of all the weights of objects in space that I hear thrown around these days.



posted on Sep, 28 2013 @ 08:03 PM
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reply to post by TwiTcHomatic
 


Hmmm, a lot of firework in 2014 I see



posted on Sep, 28 2013 @ 08:04 PM
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I don't suppose it would hurt to stock up on staples, food and bottled water, just in case a satellite gets hit or our power grid is disrupted.


Thanks for the videos! Very informative.



posted on Sep, 28 2013 @ 08:04 PM
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reply to post by evc1shop
 

There is a difference between weight and mass but both are expressed in the same units. The comet (and its dust tail) are weightless because they are in freefall around the Sun, just as the astronauts in the ISS are weightless because they are in freefall around the Earth. But they still have mass.

Those numbers are estimates based on very little data and observations of past comets.
edit on 9/28/2013 by Phage because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 28 2013 @ 08:20 PM
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reply to post by Phage
 
Phage, thanks!

I just always think it is strange to hear talk of weight in space when we have been told since day one that objects in space are pretty much weightless. I figured that the scientists must apply some calculations using Earth's gravity to get the estimates but could never figure out why it matters. Wouldn't it make more sense to speak in terms of volume of mass/density changed or lost?

---
Just something I was thinking about, please answer if you have time as it is off-topic somewhat
If two objects in space are moving at significant velocity on intersecting vectors and they collide head-on how do they calculate the energy released at impact? Is weight a factor or is it a strict mass/density/velocity kind of equation?

Is that similar to what happens with calculating collision energy in the LHC?



posted on Sep, 28 2013 @ 09:12 PM
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reply to post by evc1shop
 


Weight is not a factor. Just velocity and mass. E=1/2mv^2

With the LHC it's sort of the same but more complex because you are dealing with relativistic velocities.
edit on 9/28/2013 by Phage because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 28 2013 @ 09:22 PM
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reply to post by Phage
 

That makes perfect sense to me, thanks again.
I really like your short & direct answers. :beer:





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