It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

A Question About Time

page: 2
3
<< 1   >>

log in

join
share:

posted on Aug, 11 2013 @ 12:27 PM
link   
reply to post by swanne
 



Just think about it. Do insects, which are smaller, live in the past or the future relative to you?


The smaller it is, the shorter its life span. In contrast, the larger it is, the longer its lifespan. What does that tell you?
edit on 11-8-2013 by AfterInfinity because: (no reason given)




posted on Aug, 11 2013 @ 12:34 PM
link   

Originally posted by AfterInfinity
reply to post by swanne
 



Just think about it. Do insects, which are smaller, live in the past or the future relative to you?


The smaller it is, the shorter its life span. In contrast, the larger it is, the longer its lifespan. What does that tell you?
edit on 11-8-2013 by AfterInfinity because: (no reason given)

How is that relevant? The question was 'Do insects live in the past or future in relation to you?'

Everything living is living in the present.
Nothing can live in the past or future - life is alive now.
edit on 11-8-2013 by Itisnowagain because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 11 2013 @ 01:31 PM
link   
reply to post by Pistoche
 


Yes, but where does size comes in? Relativity is either caused by velocity or gravitational fields. Size won't bend space-time as long as you don't factor in time. Since you and me already both know that, why the "size" thing? If there's a small lizard on your hand, it won't move slower in time just because it's small.



posted on Aug, 11 2013 @ 01:33 PM
link   
reply to post by AfterInfinity
 


Yeah, but remember, we are talking about spacetime curvature, not organism lifespan.





edit on 11-8-2013 by swanne because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 11 2013 @ 01:35 PM
link   
reply to post by swanne
 




Yeah, but remember, we are talking about spacetime curvature, not organism lifespan.


You think they're not connected?



posted on Aug, 11 2013 @ 01:57 PM
link   

Originally posted by AfterInfinity
You think they're not connected?

No, they are not. When Einstein is talking about Time Dilation, he isn't referring to the lifespan of a living organism, he is referring to the local spacetime distortion in which a body resides. The two are unrelated in physics.

Good to see you again, BTW. How you been mate?



edit on 11-8-2013 by swanne because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 11 2013 @ 02:00 PM
link   
reply to post by swanne
 



No, they are not. When Einstein is talking about Time Dilation, he isn't referring to the lifespan of a body, he is referring to the local spacetime distortion in which that body resides.


And obviously, the body doesn't affect the local spacetime distortion in which it resides. It is, in fact, the only factor which does not influence the spacetime around it.


Here's an idea: let's get someone with a degree in this discussion. Someone who knows what they are talking about. Neither me nor Swanne here are qualified to make an educated statement in the matter.
edit on 11-8-2013 by AfterInfinity because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 11 2013 @ 02:03 PM
link   

Originally posted by AfterInfinity
And obviously, the body doesn't affect the local spacetime distortion in which it resides.

Well, the body's mass is the cause of such distortion, while the gravitational pull that comes is the result of such distortion. Einstein exposes the gravitational force as a result of spacetime distortion, but such distortion will only occur around massive bodies.



posted on Aug, 11 2013 @ 02:43 PM
link   
reply to post by swanne
 


Do you have a degree that qualifies you to speak in this subject? Or is this armchair physics we're talking?



posted on Aug, 11 2013 @ 05:17 PM
link   
reply to post by Bone75
 


Yes i do. Your experience of time would have been more details, more cause and effect and therefore more timely.



posted on Aug, 11 2013 @ 05:17 PM
link   

Originally posted by AfterInfinity
reply to post by swanne
 


Do you have a degree that qualifies you to speak in this subject? Or is this armchair physics we're talking?


I fail to see the distinction when were talking theoretical sciences.



posted on Aug, 12 2013 @ 02:05 AM
link   
What is the time duration of now?
How long is now and can there be two separate now's now?


When will than be now?
Soon!!!
Sounds like you need spaceballs.

www.youtube.com...
edit on 12-8-2013 by SpunGCake because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 12 2013 @ 04:08 AM
link   

Originally posted by SpunGCake


When will than be now?
Soon!!!

Is it ever 'then' where you are?
Or is 'then' a concept arising now?
edit on 12-8-2013 by Itisnowagain because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 12 2013 @ 08:31 AM
link   

Originally posted by AfterInfinity
reply to post by swanne
 


Do you have a degree that qualifies you to speak in this subject?

I've been an astronomer since I was a little kid. You don't need a degree to understand and discuss about this kind of thing.

"If you can't explain your physics to a barmaid it is probably not very good physics."

-Ernest Rutherford

~

Don't feel guilty about discussing science. That's why it's called "science" (knowledge) and "theories" (scientific method), as opposed to "religion" (authority and rigidity).




edit on 12-8-2013 by swanne because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 12 2013 @ 08:53 AM
link   

Originally posted by SpunGCake
When will than be now?
Soon!!!
Sounds like you need spaceballs.

lol I was just thinking the very same thing.



posted on Aug, 12 2013 @ 09:12 AM
link   
reply to post by AfterInfinity
 





The smaller it is, the shorter its life span. In contrast, the larger it is, the longer its lifespan. What does that tell you?


Not all life.

The life span of a Great Dane is 6-8 years whereas the life span of a Chihuahua is 10-18 years.





posted on Aug, 12 2013 @ 09:16 AM
link   
reply to post by AfterInfinity
 





Do you have a degree that qualifies you to speak in this subject?




No one speak a word unless they have a degree in all things related to the English language.



posted on Aug, 12 2013 @ 05:22 PM
link   
reply to post by Bone75
 


wow. what a bunch of boneheaded responses to a really simple and incredibly interesting thought experiment. (well, in fairness, there were also great responses.)

time and length distortions are equivalent through the Lorentz factor, which is the central factor in special reletivity.

as such, i would answer that your thought experiment is a fascinating trip, and that it yields a lot of really interesting consequences for the (proposed and somewhat supported) independent 'frame rate' at different scales of the universe.

lets look at it from another perspective... how much time would it take you, comparitively, to measure the coastline of britain with a toothpick vs. a flagpole? this is a fascinating question which takes us down a completely different path from your initial proposal.


i really enjoyed that. thanks, op.



posted on Aug, 15 2013 @ 09:02 PM
link   
Relativity in relation to the speed of light and the effects of time dilation presents that time is a dimension. One that places a speed limit upon how fast an object with mass is traveling through space. An interesting thing about the situation is that black holes contain infinite density as far as has been calculated. Beyond of course the matters of FTL related to relativity, if an object with mass reaches the speed of light it will also achieve
infinite density.

Further if an object the size of the Earth where to be "shrunk" down to the size of a golf ball it would become a black hole.

Today if it were not for our understanding of Time Dilation, GPS would not work. Its existence is verified every time GPS is used these days.

It is important to consider that all forms of life on earth have life cycle. They are born, mature and die. A geriatric ant is about 6 1/2 weeks old on average (queens live for about a year). That is a lifetime and however one may want to define it and ant living to old age is not exactly a walk in a park.

Say for example some new technology is discovered tomorrow that extends human life to 500 years.Cleary to us that would seem like a very long time to live. But what if you were born say 50 years from now when the idea of being living that long, has been relegated to stories about the old days?

Dimensions constitute the structure of reality they are like rails to a train and with the right force the train can
be derailed.

Objects with mass as the train (in this example) exist in state of equilibrium.

How that state of equilibrium is defined?

As we are learning in developing FTL travel those rules can be broken.

Any thoughts?



new topics

top topics



 
3
<< 1   >>

log in

join