The Bank Owns Your Money Not You!

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posted on Jul, 24 2013 @ 07:11 AM
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OK I know this has probably been covered in other threads before but this happened to me personally and it got me thinking. I recently bought a house and we had to organize everything quickly. So we went in to the bank and signed all the papers we needed to sign, it took about an hour. Well, it turns out the loan office forgot one piece of paper for us to sign, authorizing the bank to take the shortfall between the price of the house and the loan they were giving us (the deposit). The bank manager said not to worry about it that he could authorize them (the settlement office of the bank) to take the money out of our account. It turns out that if he and another bank manager or one of the regional managers both authorize it, they can take my money out of my account and give it to some third party. Don't get me wrong, I was glad he could as it would have meant a long drive to the branch to sign the paper etc.

So it got me thinking about how Cyprus forbade people to take their money out of their accounts and the banks complied with that. Also how the courts can order all someone's accounts to be frozen and later seized - again that can be a good thing if they are international terrorists or drug smugglers.

Also I remember many years ago when I got my first bank charge, an account keeping fee, the bank took it out of my account without me ever authorizing them to do anything of the sort. When I opened the account, there were no fees, they were introduced later, so I didn't agree to it when I opened the account. Why don't they present you with a bill at the end of the month like utility companies do instead of just taking the money out whenever they want to. Once again, it is convenient but I don't remember ever giving them the authority to take money out of my account.

So I have realized that once you put money in to a bank account, it isn't yours anymore, it is theirs. Which another confirmation of the truth I have worked out in the last year: money is bull#! I will continue to invest in hard physical assets instead of putting my money in the bank and just use them to move the stuff around.

Counting......




posted on Jul, 24 2013 @ 07:51 AM
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Originally posted by Cinrad
Also how the courts can order all someone's accounts to be frozen and later seized - again that can be a good thing if they are international terrorists or drug smugglers.



I think in most places in the world it is much like the "no fly" list:
- *suspected* terrorist group, not *actual* terrorist group, and
- no court order required. They just do it.

I recall the example of a record shop owner in Australia who by chance, had a similar name to a Peruvian terrorist group of the 1980's. Bank just went ahead and shut his bank account without investigating.

Bottom of this page... link



posted on Jul, 24 2013 @ 08:03 AM
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reply to post by Cinrad
 


Isn't that why some accounts pay you interest, as long as you leave your money in the bank ?
They get to use your money like it's theirs.



posted on Jul, 24 2013 @ 08:04 AM
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I recently had a similar situation with the bank taking money out of my acccounts.
Things are very tight financially due to really excessive medical bills. I had planned expenditures to the point there was less than $5 in my checking account, no outstanding checks/charges etc.

The bank then assesses a $6 charge for bill pay service - which used to be free when I signed up for it in 2000 - that fee causes an account overdraft. So the bank rapes my savings account for the entire balance of $24.64 to make up the difference. So there we were with a ZERO balance in savings and almost nothing in checking with an automatic paycheck deposit happening the next day... Then they charged me $12.50 for taking my money.

I was pissed, called the bank, asked when I signed up, asked for the ORIGINAL agreement from 2000 - and they just send a package of all their current documents - that have all sorts of conditions and charges I never agreed to. These days written agreements are worthless with banks and THEY can change your terms any time without your consent just by mailing you a new brochure or adding a note to your statement.

Unfortunately, I couldn't find my original agreement 13 years later or we'd be having a helluva lawsuit.

ganjoa



posted on Jul, 24 2013 @ 08:05 AM
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So I have realized that once you put money in to a bank account, it isn't yours anymore, it is theirs.


OP this is in fact how it works. You literately give the bank your money and they give you a piece of paper saying that you have 'money' placed in their financial institutional. Since you have given them your money they can then do with it as they please such as lending it out to several other people at the same time.



Which another confirmation of the truth I have worked out in the last year: money is bull#!


Historically real money comes in two flavors, gold and silver coin and has its value in the weight of the coin. No matter what the banks say, paper currency is worthless and has no inherent value of its own, it's just paper and ink. With the use of computers, it's all electronic and you so called money is made up of 1's and 0's and a computers dream. It isn't even as tangible as paper currency and that's worthless. It's a giant ponzi scheme and we the public are the ones getting fleeced. Just wait until it goes full electronic and see what happens, it will get even more interesting.



posted on Jul, 24 2013 @ 08:08 AM
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After the Great Depression people started stuffing their mattresses with their cash. Great way to keep your money out of their hands but you wont earn any interest.

As if anybody is really earning any now anyway

edit on 24-7-2013 by SLAYER69 because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 24 2013 @ 08:36 AM
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Originally posted by SLAYER69
After the Great Depression people started stuffing their mattresses with their cash. Great way to keep your money out of their hands but you wont earn any interest.

As if anybody is really earning any now anyway

edit on 24-7-2013 by SLAYER69 because: (no reason given)


I recently read some articles about how historical artworks are actually one of the best possible investments you can make. Fine art. Collecting artifacts from history, coins etc etc.

It does not depreciate in value over time, it increases significantly. The reward payoff ratio is typically extravagant in many cases for those who were wise with their treasures.

Stay away from "Investment Funding Organizations" though, as they are probably just gonna rip you off.
I am talking like purchasing a sculpture worth 45,000 $ dollars today according to most experts appraisals.

By 2050 we are talking unknown values, but due to rarity and historical values incrementally increasing, it clearly would be worth much more in comparison of buying power required to obtain such a thing.

I mean look at all these TV shows that are popular now, like American Pickers. These guys will pay 20 $ for a freaking can because of it's collector and historical value due to rarity or condition. Obviously mint condition rewards the highest return, but even low quality condition artifacts can fetch a nice sum.
edit on 24-7-2013 by muzzleflash because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 24 2013 @ 08:36 AM
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Here we have a thread that is important for us to know about....with no one appreciating it !! S&F for You. I've always tried to use cash and keep my funds out the banking system. When SHTF , how many people will be outraged and pleading for their money?



posted on Jul, 24 2013 @ 08:45 AM
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That is why it is well known that many people take up collecting stuff. Because they see a future where many of these things will increase in value although they accept some artifacts may become completely worthless depending.

For example this one guy I used to know, he collected Comic Books as his investment choice. He was really picky and had a great nose for what was worth what.

He had the Flash # 1, and Fantastic Four #1, and tons of other high value pieces.
We are talking mega $$$ here actually.

He bought these comics when they came out, saving them with the belief they would become valuable. Who made the right investment of their 1$? He invested a dollar or even less probably....Had he been really smart he would have bought a box of copies!

Last I heard he was sending his kids to college by selling like 5 of these comic books.
I will reiterate, this guy sent his kid to college 50years later by making extremely good investments with about 5 dollars or so.



posted on Jul, 24 2013 @ 08:54 AM
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Don't ever just throw your $$$ into something. Especially if it's a lot of $$$.

Think long and hard about your investment options, ask experts about stats and figures, or look up the info yourself and examine it thoroughly.
Look for bargains, find dealers who are in dire straights and are willing to take a loss to just get rid of their "assets". Be really picky and reluctant. Check things out and make sure the experts consider a piece authentic and check for fraud extensively.

You never want to get in on something late, this is always poor investment strategy.
You have to be original and follow your senses and sensibilities.
Be diverse and flexible, be willing to take risks while seeking precautions that mitigate them.
Etc.



posted on Jul, 24 2013 @ 08:59 AM
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The banks do what they tell you they will do, your signing the contract / agreement / terms of use gives them permission to by you.

Maybe if people just learned to read stuff before they sign it they wouldn't be taken by surprise, better yet they might know better than to even do business with them at all.

Lastly, they always reserve their right to make changes on a whim whenever they want without consulting you.

Banks are the biggest joke that was ever pulled on mankind, and most people I know seem to be convinced that they are somehow necessary.

Banks are based on fraud, you agree to be defrauded by signing the agreement that states you agree with their terms, reading those terms, however fraudulent and unfair they may be releases them from the liability of being charged with fraud by you.


edit on 24-7-2013 by MyHappyDogShiner because: needed more



posted on Jul, 24 2013 @ 10:28 AM
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Originally posted by MyHappyDogShiner

Banks are based on fraud, you agree to be defrauded by signing the agreement that states you agree with their terms, reading those terms, however fraudulent and unfair they may be releases them from the liability of being charged with fraud by you.


That seems to be a fairly accurate way of putting it.
Good post for explaining the finer print, haha!

Contractual consent of waiver of liability through a signature.



posted on Jul, 24 2013 @ 12:00 PM
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Originally posted by MyHappyDogShiner
The banks do what they tell you they will do, your signing the contract / agreement / terms of use gives them permission to by you.

Maybe if people just learned to read stuff before they sign it they wouldn't be taken by surprise, better yet they might know better than to even do business with them at all.

Lastly, they always reserve their right to make changes on a whim whenever they want without consulting you.

Banks are the biggest joke that was ever pulled on mankind, and most people I know seem to be convinced that they are somehow necessary.

Banks are [color=gold] based on fraud, you agree to be defrauded by signing the agreement that states you agree with their terms, reading those terms, however fraudulent and unfair they may be releases them from the liability of being charged with fraud by you.


Exactly.

The contracts one is MADE to sign are not the result of negotiation,
they are a manifestation of the banks dictating to us, sign this or starve.

Old accounts are bleed dry by fees and charges.

New penalties that encourage banks to push you below "minimum deposits"
create a penalty feedback loop that is most lucrative for THE BANKS.

All of this is done without negotiation,
heavily concealed by psychological manipulation,
and in no way is the result of any new service, or product,
even though they love to use the phrases service, and product continually.


In business law terms "there is no consideration."


In 1977 the savings accounts were deregulated.

Did you know in the 1920's before the great bank conquest of smaller banks (called the great depression by some lying historians) that all banks posted their total deposits in the Newspapers of the day.

We are less informed,
and more highly penalized
than any persons in the history
of the world, and the history of banking.

May they all rot in hell at the same rate of penalties
and fees they charged during their lives.


Mike



posted on Jul, 24 2013 @ 12:10 PM
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reply to post by Cinrad
 


I've been saying forfriggingever that all of the dollars in existence belong to the federal reserve. They create these pieces of paper and they own them. That's why people must borrow their "product" and then pay interest on the loans with money that is NOT created except by someone else's borrowing from that same private, for profit corporation. Its a Ponzi scheme to the nth degree.

One guy puts it like this, any five year old kid knows that if you put ten marbles in a tin can and shake it up you can still only ever get ten marbles back out. The usury banking system takes the eleventh marble out of the hides of those who borrow their money. And that includes the government, which is totally anti-godlin since they are the ones who signed onto private for profit banking with the federal reserve act. Like they didn't know what would happen. Somebody actually voted for such imbeciles?

But there are things we can do to upset their applecart:
www.publicbankinginstitute.org...



posted on Jul, 24 2013 @ 12:16 PM
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Originally posted by frazzle
reply to post by Cinrad
 


I've been saying forfriggingever that all of the dollars in existence belong to the federal reserve. They create these pieces of paper and they own them. That's why people must borrow their "product" and then pay interest on the loans with money that is NOT created except by someone else's borrowing from that same private, for profit corporation. Its a Ponzi scheme to the nth degree.

One guy puts it like this, any five year old kid knows that if you put ten marbles in a tin can and shake it up you can still only ever get ten marbles back out. The usury banking system takes the eleventh marble out of the hides of those who borrow their money. And that includes the government, which is totally anti-godlin since they are the ones who signed onto private for profit banking with the federal reserve act. Like they didn't know what would happen. Somebody actually voted for such imbeciles?

But there are things we can do to upset their applecart:
www.publicbankinginstitute.org...



Frazzle,
I'm sorry but please don't start up with the Federal Reserve stuff again.
We are talking about Bankers in this thread, and the policies of individual banks,
not Bernanke.

The fed is the only reason we know that our corrupt politicians have put us into trillions of dollars worth of debt.
Without the Fed, the politicians would lie to us and say "it's you peasant's faults, cause ya'll is lazy!" Like has happened before in so many previous forms of government in the history of the world.

But the fact that the Banks have stopped paying interest on savings,
have invented volumes of penalties and creeping fees out of whole cloth,
all while tricking us into signing away our rights to justice
...without giving any consideration...
is beyond criminal. It's nefarious. It's infectious. It's the plague.





Mike



posted on Jul, 24 2013 @ 12:25 PM
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reply to post by mikegrouchy
 



Frazzle,
I'm sorry but please don't start up with the Federal Reserve stuff again.
We are talking about Bankers in this thread, and the policies of individual banks,
not Bernanke.


There are 12 federal reserve banks in the US. Are you saying your friendly neighborhood banker isn't joined at the hip to them or that individual bank policies aren't dictated by the big 12?



posted on Jul, 24 2013 @ 01:01 PM
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Originally posted by frazzle
reply to post by mikegrouchy
 



Frazzle,
I'm sorry but please don't start up with the Federal Reserve stuff again.
We are talking about Bankers in this thread, and the policies of individual banks,
not Bernanke.


There are 12 federal reserve banks in the US. Are you saying your friendly neighborhood banker isn't joined at the hip to them or that individual bank policies aren't dictated by the big 12?


As long as you are willing to admit their only connection is at the hip,
then my work in separating the issues is done.

Bernanke has been keeping countless municipalities afloat by buying their Bonds,
something the megabanks seem reluctant to do. Even going so far as to have
their financial-show talking-heads criticize Bernanke about it, and trying to force him
to "tapper off."

Something he has admitted being willing to do, if it is right. But the megabanks are not stepping in to pick up any of the slack. And just when they have record surpluses of cash on hand.

Hmmmm. I think the banksters want to pick up entire municipalities for a $1 at the police auctions after they go bankrupt.


Mike

In my estimation
out of all the corrupt banks and bankers,
only Bernanke himself is actually on our side.

I think TPTB forked up and put an honest man in the position to take the fall,
thinking we couldn't tell the difference.
edit on 24-7-2013 by mikegrouchy because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 24 2013 @ 02:49 PM
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reply to post by Cinrad
 


The truth in what you just said is that if everybody on earth would simply reject the financial system as it is, not accepting paper as a currency, this is the end of the banks as we know them, they would have no more power.



Thruthseek3r



posted on Jul, 24 2013 @ 07:14 PM
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I'm more of the prepper bent, so I prefer to invest in things like spinning wheels, weaving looms, tools, an old metal forge, barrels, spades, rakes, fencing, chickens, grape crusher, land, camp smoker, guns, crossbows, etc. Once I have one of each of these things, then I can invest in more and swap them for other stuff or labour, with people who don't. In a permanent SHTF situation, this stuff will be worth thousands of times more than money in the bank no matter how high the interest rate is. The longer you have these things before the SHTF the less your return on them, unless you use them in meantime to save money. I don't know what I will do when I have tens of thousands of dollars to invest, but this works for me now.



posted on Jul, 25 2013 @ 10:38 AM
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Originally posted by mikegrouchy
I'm sorry but please don't start up with the Federal Reserve stuff again.
We are talking about Bankers in this thread, and the policies of individual banks,
not Bernanke.

As long as you are willing to admit their only connection is at the hip,
then my work in separating the issues is done.


Do you always put periods in the middle of sentences? You missed the last part about "or that individual bank policies aren't dictated by the big 12?


Bernanke has been keeping countless municipalities afloat by buying their Bonds,
something the megabanks seem reluctant to do. Even going so far as to have
their financial-show talking-heads criticize Bernanke about it, and trying to force him
to "tapper off."

Something he has admitted being willing to do, if it is right. But the megabanks are not stepping in to pick up any of the slack. And just when they have record surpluses of cash on hand.

Hmmmm. I think the banksters want to pick up entire municipalities for a $1 at the police auctions after they go bankrupt.


Mike

In my estimation
out of all the corrupt banks and bankers,
only Bernanke himself is actually on our side.

I think TPTB forked up and put an honest man in the position to take the fall,
thinking we couldn't tell the difference.


That's why they call the fed res the bank of last resort. For banks. Bernanke is keeping the banks solvent on the backs of the American people, so when you say he's on our side, you must be a banker?





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