In College at 12, and off to start Ph.D at 16: Tesca Fitzgerald

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posted on Jul, 14 2013 @ 12:42 AM
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A girl after my own heart, but wonderfully much much smarter (I started University at 16). I love this girl. She's amazing.

In college at 12, off to start her Ph.D. at 16, Tigard's Tesca Fitzgerald blazes new intellectual territory

I just wish more people took to education and advancement like this. We need more people like this the world over and around. It, however, seems such a rare thing.

In the spirit of education and learning, for those interested in advancing themselves;
700+ Free University Courses online from top Universities.

I use this resource myself in updating and refreshing.

Before anyone pulls the condescension card, none of this is meant to be condescending. This is a celebration of intelligence, learning, and most importantly the desire and hunger to LEARN MORE!


It doesn't matter how 'smart' or educated you are. If you've the hunger and desire to learn more, well, then, there you go! It doesn't matter how fast, or slow, or well you go about it. However, whenever it's done, applying oneself to learning anything is wonderful.

Hurrah for Tesca Fitzgerald for having such a wonderful beautiful brain with drive, direction and purpose so young.
Hurrah for anyone and anyone still applying themselves to learning new and exciting things at any age.




posted on Jul, 14 2013 @ 01:23 AM
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reply to post by Druscilla
 


IIRC,

it can be a challenge to get known as such . . .

and

still avoid being co-opted . . . more or less kidnapped by TPTB to perform their tricks for them . . .

I pray this brilliant gal can remain free and her own person.



posted on Jul, 14 2013 @ 02:16 AM
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such a gifted mind. i would of hid her from education. no point in destroying something with so much potential. oh well.



posted on Jul, 14 2013 @ 04:21 AM
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It's impressive that she completed it that fast. Thank you for posting the link to the 725 free courses. I found one there that I need to take! It will save me a lot of time and money and provide a foundation for something greater.



posted on Jul, 14 2013 @ 05:58 AM
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Originally posted by InFriNiTee
It's impressive that she completed it that fast. Thank you for posting the link to the 725 free courses. I found one there that I need to take! It will save me a lot of time and money and provide a foundation for something greater.


You're welcome!
As to the Free online classes, they're unaccredited, so, in taking them, you'll be doing so purely for personal enrichment. That, perhaps, however, is some of the best kind of learning.


That link is always adding new classes too. I think last year there were only 400 classes available.



posted on Jul, 14 2013 @ 07:05 AM
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S&F for your posting. Education IMO is a lifelong endeavor...looks like that young girl has a big head start!



posted on Jul, 14 2013 @ 07:19 AM
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reply to post by Druscilla
 





A girl after my own heart, but wonderfully much much smarter (I started University at 16). I love this girl. She's amazing.


Though I applaud your ability to absorb information at an above average rate, what I see in the world around me are people that feel as though they aren't smart enough to even try college, or to try learning anything. I blame this on the grading system in all schools. This grading system replaces the desire to learn with the fear of failing. If people feel that they will fail, then they won't even try.

I started college late in life. Though I didn't think I could get passing grades I still went with the idea that if I learned only ten percent of what was being taught, then I would be ten percent smarter than if I didn't go to college at all. With this mentality I was relaxed about learning and wound up making it onto the dean's list my last year.

Increasing one's knowledge should be the goal for the average and below average person. Passing or failing should be irrelevant.
edit on 7/14/2013 by jiggerj because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 14 2013 @ 07:20 AM
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reply to post by Druscilla
 


I see that when I actually went to apply. It's not a problem though. They have a foundational course that I should take for a career I want to get into. It will make it a lot easier to learn the certification that I want to take locally, so in fact it does save a lot of money. I can always go breeze through the course I'm studying for free at a later date to get officially certified. It's just nice to find the foundation for something I was thinking of doing already. I can learn a lot before I actually go pay for a class. It will give me a good place to start from.



posted on Jul, 14 2013 @ 07:32 AM
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I use a lot of those online courses, plus any free education I can find. I am also forking out another 20k for my masters, finally deciding to finish it. The way the economy is, might as well.



posted on Jul, 14 2013 @ 07:55 AM
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reply to post by jiggerj
 


Learning just for the sake of learning is wonderful. It's a sad thing when people are intimidated by a grading system, but, I can understand how such pressure might get onto someone.
That's the wonderful thing about these online courses; they're totally free and entirely optional. If someone simply wanted to take their time in learning any subject until they feel they'd mastered it to their own satisfaction, even if it took 25 years to do so, it's entirely up to them.

reply to post by InFriNiTee
 


Yes, these resources are a wonderful place to gain mastery or familiarity of any core requisite subjects, or just use them for refreshment.
I hadn't thought of it as a money saving strategy, but, that's certainly a good thing. I wonder if someone demonstrating subject mastery in core requisites will still be required to take them for accreditation, or if they might test out, and thereby save a bundle? I suppose that might be independent and variable per school.



posted on Jul, 14 2013 @ 09:18 AM
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reply to post by Druscilla
 


First of all, this belongs in Off Topic Discussions, not really a conspiracy here.

As for the subject matter itself; this young girl is incredibly gifted and I'm sure will do fantastically at whatever she chooses to do. The system looks after the useful ones



posted on Jul, 14 2013 @ 09:50 AM
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reply to post by Druscilla
 


A testament to comformity. I birthed a genius. He dropped out school as a sophmore. He was board and saw the present education system the same way Einstein saw the education system in Germany.

"The only thing that interferes with my learning is my education".
Albert Einstein

There are many more people out in the world pulling off feats of intellectual grandeur. We don't tend to see them because they don't have that institutional stamp of approval.

Drive and the ability to retain information is a bit different than intellect.



posted on Jul, 14 2013 @ 10:27 AM
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reply to post by Druscilla
 


Thanks for the link, I have saved this to my Bookmarks, wonderful site, even has sources for K-12 grades.

I have a ninth grader and will look into it further . Trying to get him to MIT. He's missed the 12 year old mark though.


S&F



posted on Jul, 17 2013 @ 06:20 PM
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Although I am glad that she is getting an education I also fear for her ability to interact int he future. She will be with people well over her age, which might cause her to relate less and become closed off. I wish her luck though. Those courses are amazing. Im currently out of school but very much wish I were in. I also use the iTunes U app to find courses online. It keeps me entertained.



posted on Jul, 18 2013 @ 04:05 AM
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Originally posted by Druscilla
I just wish more people took to education and advancement like this. We need more people like this the world over and around. It, however, seems such a rare thing.

Curious coincidence.

I've started having regular debates with my friend's son as a game. It started with me just curiously asking questions, and has turned into a thing a lil.

Was surprised when I had some statistics about the American's GDP fired back at me and a few interesting insights into morality. To be honest, I think we're a bit dorky when it comes to children. I wonder sometimes if my friend's child should be advanced a little into things they find interesting, but I wouldn't even know how to start in my country.

Am not saying is the next Newton, and certainly focusing is a problem but on the right topics children really take to it.



posted on Aug, 22 2013 @ 12:56 PM
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Yep - that's great. And here's a BOY that's an even greater genius. See - these prodigies come in all shapes, sizes, nationalities, ethnicities, and GENDERS. Good for them... we should be proud of them ALL.


Boy Genius, 12, Has Higher IQ Than Einstein, Developing His Own Theory of Relativity

In fact - here's a rather extensive list of many, worldwide child prodigies -all under the age of 15. Curiously - for some reason - they are overwhelmingly male.
edit on 8/22/2013 by Outrageo because:




posted on Aug, 22 2013 @ 01:26 PM
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reply to post by Outrageo
 


That's nice and all, and good for them, but, this thread is NOT about gender.

Feel free to argue about gender issues in a thread where gender issues are the topic.

Thanks.



posted on Aug, 22 2013 @ 02:26 PM
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reply to post by Druscilla
 


Some of these children are really inspirational. It is so rewarding (and hopeful, in a sense), to know Tesca and her brethren are part of the future.

There's a great article in the current issue (Aug/Sept 2013) of Popular Science magazine about another 12-year old now teaching others at MIT!



With kids like Tesca and Quin - I believe there is greatness yet to be realized on this world...

Thanks for posting...



posted on Aug, 26 2013 @ 09:17 PM
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These brats will never build streets like MEN DO. They will never build homes like MEN DO. To make it in this world you need raw masculinity, street smarts and the power to manipulate. Having a high I.Q don't mean crap.

This damn topic is annoyingly feminine btw



posted on Aug, 26 2013 @ 09:38 PM
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reply to post by Barthandelus
 


Once again, that's nice and all, but this thread isn't a thread about gender.
This is a thread about the wonderful abilities of those gifted with above average and beyond intelligence and the application of such.

However:
If you want to discuss your admiration of men sweating in the sun with shovels and jack hammers, feel free to start your own coming out of the closet obsession over sweaty dull men appreciation thread.

Meanwhile, while you ponder that last sentence, ponder also the aspect that people with some intelligence designed and made capable the computer you're using, the cars you drive on those roads to admire your sweaty dull minded men, and the cell phone you use to call all your other road construction admiration fellows so you can gather and gawk in sweaty heated admiration of the sweaty labors in progress, possibly fantasizing about whatever it is one who has such admiration of road construction workers fantasizes about.

There's no need to tell us which one of The Village People you liked the most:





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