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"One Day, All The Way" course of Freemasonry

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posted on Nov, 7 2004 @ 11:49 PM
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A good friend of mine who is of the 32nd degree in the Scottish Rite has informally invited me to join the Freemasons next year, after my initiation into another society has been finalized. He has mentioned that I could attend a "One Day, All the Way" course, where I would instantly become a 32nd Degree Freemason (we live in the LA area.)

I have several questions about this; for one thing, he made it seem that the degree is in name only, and thus not an "official" 32nd rank (of course, since I'm only 18 now, I'd still have far more than enough time to rise through the other ranks before I'd even be old enough to qualify for the coveted 33rd degree
)

I also heard that many Masons are very much against this practice, as it goes against the regular escalation of a candidate, or whatever.

Any Masons have more information about this ceremony?


[edit on 9-11-2004 by Don Armageddon]




posted on Nov, 8 2004 @ 12:31 AM
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I am not to sure if you have all of the info strait.. You in no way will become a 32nd degree Mason in one day. However there are “One Day, All the Way” initiations for Master Masons and “One Day, All the Way” initiations for the Scottish Rite, to my knowledge this is the only way it is done in the States, as far as Scottish Rite is concerned (well it is one or two day depending on where you are). So first you would be raised a Master Mason, then you able to go through the Scottish Rite.

Becoming a Master Mason in one day?? Well I wouldn’t and I won’t. I will be going through my initiation (1st degree) at the end of this month. From what I have heard and read you will miss out on a lot if you do the “One Day, All the Way” initiation. You should take the time between each degree to reflect on what it is that you have learned, not just plow through it and hope you can remember all of what has been said and taught.

One more thing, where do you live? Because it is my understanding that you have to be 21 years old to join Freemasonry anywhere in the world. So if any Masons here can shed some light on this it would be great.

Finally I would ask Theron, Bill and MasonicLight what their take on “One Day, All the Way” initiations. I have seen some discussions on other boards where Theron was against it, and some others had gone through the “One Day, All the Way” and said that there was nothing wrong with it and they learned all they needed to know after they were Master Masons.

Good Luck



posted on Nov, 8 2004 @ 12:54 AM
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Yeah, I wasn't certain about whether I'd have to become a Master Mason beforehand, or whatnot...but the way it was described, it seemed as if I would make 32nd degree in one day (though it would be recommended to later on go through all the other degrees the old-fashioned way.)

I live in Los Angeles, and as far as my friend has told me, the minimum age here is 18. In my limited research into Freemasonry, I understand that the minimum age can be anywhere from 18-25, depending on location.



posted on Nov, 8 2004 @ 04:37 PM
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Last Austust (2004), at our Annual Outdoor Lodge meeting, our Grand Master himself raised a young'n at the age of 18. I know that in the state of COlorado, 18 is the "Lawful" age.

As for the one day classes... you can become a 32 degree mason by either following the York Rite, or Scottish Rite, or both. Either one can ONLY be given by a 2-3 day class. You have to be a Master Mason to enter into the these "Rites", but it's not such a higher level of Masonry that you have to become some kind of elder or something, before you can go on. To all masons, 32 degree or not, the highest level of masonry is the 3rd degree Or Master Mason.

Yes, COlorado has had various types of 1st, 2nd, and 3rd, degree classes as well. These have been refered to as Piolit Lodge programs, as not every lodge can do them, just a select few. We usta have the one days classes, and NO one liked them. This past year we have been doing a "Better" version of the Piolit Lodge. and takes about one-two months to recieve the 3 degrees... I have much more to say about the Piolit lodge programs. Should anyone wish for me to go on.

[edit on 8-11-2004 by CO_Cowboy]



posted on Nov, 8 2004 @ 04:59 PM
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Originally posted by CO_Cowboy
As for the one day classes... you can become a 32 degree mason by either following the York Rite, or Scottish Rite, or both. Either one can ONLY be given by a 2-3 day class. You have to be a Master Mason to enter into the these "Rites", but it's not such a higher level of Masonry that you have to become some kind of elder or something, before you can go on. To all masons, 32 degree or not, the highest level of masonry is the 3rd degree Or Master Mason.


The typical "All the Way in One Day" is conducted in four successive ceremonies (the Third Degree being split into two sections, I don't count the Lectures as being a separate section in this format), a representative Candidate is chosen for each Degree, and actually experiences the Degree in full, the remainder merely participate in the Obligation. I feel that this is a less effective means of Initiating, Passing and Raising a Candidate and I agree with Grand Lodges that eschew such means. That being said it does have an appeal to those who feel they "don't have the time". In my Lodge, if a Candidate chooses to expedite his Journey to Light, he will be expected to work with greater urgency on his Proficiency. As to the Scottish Rite and York Rite, only the Scottish Rite has the 4th thru 32nd Degrees (and the full Reunion is only three days, so what's the rush?), and the York Rite culminates in the Knight's Templar (not the 32nd Degree), and in my Jurisdiction is conferred on three successive Saturdays (I've never heard of an all the way, but it must exist). Another note, and one that I find most common, is the practice of taking "brand new" Master Masons and Obligating them into the Shrine (since so many are anxious to get there). This is not detrimental in my view provided they stay active in the Blue Lodge, and attend the "Hot Sands" at their earliest convenience.


Ritual Monkeys, not just for missed lines anymore…



posted on Nov, 8 2004 @ 05:46 PM
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Don,

I am a member of the Grand Lodge of California, and we just voted DOWN the one day process, and it would only, if it had been approved, taken you through the first three degrees only. the 4th through 32 are usually conferred over a two day process.

Even had the one day conferral passed, you would not have been able (nor do i really think you would want) to get all 32 degrees in a single day. is your firend a member of the grand Lodge of California, Free and Accepted Masons, or is he a member of a clandestine and irregular lodge?

No insult intended, just trying to clear it up...



posted on Nov, 8 2004 @ 06:11 PM
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Originally posted by Mirthful Me
the York Rite culminates in the Knight's Templar (not the 32nd Degree), and in my Jurisdiction is conferred on three successive Saturdays (I've never heard of an all the way, but it must exist).


Mirthful,

Glad you said that. I was going to...but...

As far as one-day York Rite, we do it in Kentucky & Missouri. Master Masons can come in early on a Saturday, receive the Chapter & Council before lunch and the Commandery afterwards. Before the membership requirement was changed, they used to have a "raise your right hand and say 'I do'" for the Shrine as well. TOO QUICK, if you ask me....but then again, no one asked me... :-)

BTW, send me a U2U as to what state you're in...I've forgotten.

Fraternally,



posted on Nov, 8 2004 @ 07:09 PM
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Originally posted by amike555
I am not to sure if you have all of the info strait.. You in no way will become a 32nd degree Mason in one day. However there are “One Day, All the Way” initiations for Master Masons and “One Day, All the Way” initiations for the Scottish Rite, to my knowledge this is the only way it is done in the States, as far as Scottish Rite is concerned (well it is one or two day depending on where you are). So first you would be raised a Master Mason, then you able to go through the Scottish Rite.


It depends. Last year in Ohio, there was a one day class that conferred the Blue Lodge Degrees in the morning, the 32° of the Scottish Rite, Northern Jurisdiction in the afternoon, and the Shrine ceremonial in the evening. The Supreme Council 33°, N.J., gave permission to omit the 4° - 31° entirely, conferring the 32° in full on the new Master Masons, a controversial practice indeed.


One more thing, where do you live? Because it is my understanding that you have to be 21 years old to join Freemasonry anywhere in the world. So if any Masons here can shed some light on this it would be great.


Many Grand Jurisdictions have lowered the age to 18, especially the Grand Lodges in the US.


Finally I would ask Theron, Bill and MasonicLight what their take on “One Day, All the Way” initiations. I have seen some discussions on other boards where Theron was against it, and some others had gone through the “One Day, All the Way” and said that there was nothing wrong with it and they learned all they needed to know after they were Master Masons.


I oppose the 1 day classes for several reasons. To begin with, it offers "fast food Masonry", and sets a poor example. If a man is serious about Masonry, he will not mind traveling the path in the traditional manner.
Secondly, it robs the Candidate of the personal experience of initiation, which is a large factor in the fraternity's history.

Fiat Lvx.



posted on Nov, 8 2004 @ 08:45 PM
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Originally posted by amike555
Finally I would ask Theron, Bill and MasonicLight what their take on “One Day, All the Way” initiations. I have seen some discussions on other boards where Theron was against it, and some others had gone through the “One Day, All the Way” and said that there was nothing wrong with it and they learned all they needed to know after they were Master Masons.


You ask an interesting question, and one that we have debated for what seems like eons. I am adamantly opposed to one day degrees. It is not a matter of what you learn IN those degrees, or on those days. It is more a matter to me, of several things.

One of them is that the lecture speaks of going this way as all brothers and fellows have done before... well, if you do the degree in a day, you're NOT. One element of masonry that ties us ALL together is the unique and common experience. Whether you are raised in the UK, Canada, Peru, Pakistan, Iraq or America, EVERY mason shares that unique experience of kneeling at the altar and walking the same path.

Part of the rational of the degrees is to IMPRESS upon the novitiate certain wise and serious truths, and the method of impressing that upon them IS the ritual. Now, sure, you leave the lodgeroom and continue your studies, but if you omit the traditional method of taking the degrees, you steal from yourself the experience which, in a large part, MAKES a man a mason, though to be sure, a man is FIRST made a mason in his heart.

There are many more reasons, and I got up at Grand Communication this year to speak against it, and the Junior Past Grand Master credits ME with being the proximate cause of the initiative's failure... I think he is too generious. Anyway, I oppose it.



posted on Nov, 8 2004 @ 09:23 PM
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I am with Theron on this one, completely.

I am vehemently against this one-day degree process, and I am VERY wary of subverting tradition in the name of modern convenience or public approval.



posted on Nov, 9 2004 @ 12:16 AM
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Originally posted by LTD602
I am with Theron on this one, completely.


I agree as well. Sure, you can probably learn the basics in one day and be an OK Mason. But, there are reasons for the steps. To learn, to be taught, and to experience masonry and let things sink in. When I was first initiated, I had tons of questions afterwards. I have to learn many things to show my proficiency in the degree. If you are made a Mason-in-a-day, then I feel that could lead some to be a bit lazy in their learning. If one wantd to, they could jsut do that and never study anything else and jsut show up to meetings, making them just a social club. although I hope that this would not really happen. But, the experience comes from the initiations and they do leave alot to reflect on. If I would have gotten it in a day, I think I would have been completely lost. I was mroe or less lost after the first one, but having a few months in between each one left me to ponder and ask ALOT of questions to understand what happened and why. A person gets much more out of the experience by EXPERIENCING it all.

The Scottish Rite over here in Japan is also a weekend to get 32nd degree.
I will be going york rite, but I have never heard of getting all the Degrees in York Rite in one day. There are branches that lead off in different Directions in York Rite, so not sure how it would work. I would turn down a 1 day ritual if it was offered though and ask to have it done over time.



posted on Nov, 9 2004 @ 01:02 AM
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Originally posted by theron dunn
Even had the one day conferral passed, you would not have been able (nor do i really think you would want) to get all 32 degrees in a single day. is your firend a member of the grand Lodge of California, Free and Accepted Masons, or is he a member of a clandestine and irregular lodge?

No insult intended, just trying to clear it up...


Yes, he's of the Free and Accepted Masons. It's possible I misinterpreted his explanation; it seems that the consensus here is that such a ceremony is only open to Master Masons (so move from the 3rd degree to the 32nd)...but I'll be sure to have him clarify that when I see him next time.

Assuming that is the case, I have a follow-up question: how long does it usually take to reach the rank of Master Mason, from the beginning?

Just as a way to illustrate my fervor to join: earlier this year I starred in my Mason friend's short film, which was based on the Masonic initiation rite from "War and Peace". I played the part of the pledge, and a genuine 33rd degree Mason played the "guide"


Thanks for all the info so far, and I'm really looking forward to joining your austere ranks when the season is right.



posted on Nov, 9 2004 @ 01:21 AM
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It USUALLY takes three months, but it depends on how fast you can memorize the return memory work and answer the questionnaires. In California, part of the candidates work is answering 25-40 questions for each degree, covering the symbolism and lectures.

I have known some that have taken all three degrees in a month, but that is rare, and I have known some men that have taken a year, and THAT is rare. It all depends on you... and your coach, of course.



posted on Nov, 12 2004 @ 09:48 PM
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I must agree with many of the sentiments expressed here.

"Short Form" work (as it is called here in Wyoming) is frowned on by many, if not most, of the members (myself included).

IMHO, short form work cheapens the experience. It's targeted towards today's society of instant gratification and ADHD...

Although -- it's not too different from those of you here who claim to be interested in becoming Masons, but have no patience to wait and participate in the work and enjoy the company of the bretheren.

And for those of you here who claim to be Masons and have rather free tongues, I say shame on you for revealing that which should only be discovered.



posted on Nov, 15 2004 @ 10:49 AM
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If you were to do everything in one day would you get looked down on by members who joined the traditional way?



posted on Nov, 15 2004 @ 04:00 PM
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Originally posted by Ruffy
If you were to do everything in one day would you get looked down on by members who joined the traditional way?


Not necessarily. We have a One-Day Mason who's on his way to being Master of the Lodge, is active in the York Rite and the Shrine.

Personally, however, I feel that you miss SO much by doing it in one day. Of course if you do, you can go back and learn about the 1st & 2nd Degrees, but so many tend to not do this and that's their loss...and ultimately Masonry's loss. I HIGHLY recommend the traditional way.

Because of my work schedule I had to take the Scottish Rite Degrees (4th - 32nd) in a day (a VERY LONG day I might add) but I've devoted a lot of time and effort in the Scottish Rite and have enjoyed every bit of it. However I still wish I could have taken it over a several-day period. There's just too much to absorb in one day. Same holds true in the Symbolic Lodge (1st - 3rd Degrees)

BTW, I've tried to reply to your U2U's but the system is busy at the moment and won't let me reply yet. I'll keep trying.

Regards



posted on Nov, 15 2004 @ 08:47 PM
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Well, having seen and participated in the 2 one-day classes in Ohio, I can tell you I do like the traditional way better. But, there is an excellent quality of degree work put on in the one-day classes.

Does it make masons? mmmmm.... well.... My thought on the matter is that "making a mason" takes more than 3 degrees and a little memory work. It is a journey, not a destination...how cliche'

The grand master's class - as they're calling it in Ohio this year, as opposed to "one day class" is about setting men's feet on the path, not trying to say that in one day they went from on the threshold to full-blown master mason.

I've seen the 32nd degree several times, and I pick up more every time I see it. It seems to present different meanings every time. Even the 3rd degree seems to present different meanings every time.

I think that the one-day classes do bring in many lookie-loos, but they also do bring in some sincere brothers. In any case, they have been an important element in Ohio Masonry since Grand Master Reynolds' year.





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